Michael Wood - The Great Turning Points of British History - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472107787
    • Publication date:07 Feb 2013
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The Great Turning Points of British History

The 20 Events That Made the Nation

By Michael Wood

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

Leading historians select and describe the 20 most significant events in British History.

Twenty of the most crucial moments in Britain's history.

BBC History Magazine asked a selection of leading historians to choose and describe the twenty most important turning points in British history from AD 1000 to 2000. Collected together, their choices present a new way of looking at our nation's story.

From the Danish invasion of Britain in 1016, to the Suez crisis in 1956, the key moments include victories (or defeats) both at home and abroad, plague, reform and even revolutions that have reshaped the British way of life. Each contribution brings the past to life, offering new perspectives and food for debate: did the Battle of Agincourt change England's role in Europe? What was the impact of American independence on Britain? Was 1916 more important than 1939? Thought-provoking and inspiring accounts.

Biographical Notes

Michael Wood is a highly respected author and TV presenter. He has over 80 documentary films to his name, most recently the critically acclaimed The Story of India. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781845299279
  • Publication date: 23 Apr 2009
  • Page count: 224
  • Imprint: Constable
If the Turning Points series - first and foremost wonderful story telling - was taught as a school history course it would excite a new generation. — Christopher Lee
Much of interest and value in this short collection of essays. They provoke discussion; they invite us to ponder on our history and to consider what it means to be British. — Allan Massie, The Scotsman
Fascinating and thought-provoking — Suite101.com
Wonderful — Good Book Guide
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Basic Books

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