Roy Moxham - A Brief History of Tea - Little, Brown Book Group

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A Brief History of Tea

Addiction, Exploitation, and Empire

By Roy Moxham

  • Paperback
  • £7.99

From tea's first discovery in China to the present day, the story of a great world obsession

Behind the wholesome image of the world's most popular drink lies a strangely murky and often violent past.

When tea began to be imported into the West from China in the seventeenth century, its high price and heavy taxes made it an immediate target for smuggling and dispute at every level, culminating in international incidents like the notorious Boston Tea Party.

In China itself the British financed their tea dealings by the ruthless imposition of the opium trade. Intrepid British tea planters soon began flocking to India, Ceylon and Africa, setting up huge plantations; often workers were bought and sold like slaves.

Roy Moxham's account of this extraordinary history begins with his own sojourn in Africa, managing 500 acres of tea and a thousand-strong workforce. His experiences inform the book and led him to investigate the early history of tea - and the results of his researches reflect little credit on the British Empire, while often revealing a fascinating world story.

Biographical Notes

Roy Moxham is the highly acclaimed author of The Great Hedge of India. He is a former tea planter and gallery owner and was latterly book conservator for Canterbury Cathedral and the University of London. He now lives in London and India.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781845297473
  • Publication date: 29 Jan 2009
  • Page count: 272
  • Imprint: Robinson
Absorbing - and sometimes shocking. — Christopher Ondaatje., Literary Review
Very well written . . . enlightening. — Financial Times
A masterful historical study. — Good Book Guide
This book is a fascinating mix of personal experience, a passion for the subject and an enthralling history. — Yorkshire Gazette and Herald
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