Helen Nicholson - A Brief History of the Knights Templar - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472117878
    • Publication date:07 Mar 2014
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A Brief History of the Knights Templar

By Helen Nicholson

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

This fully updated edition is recognised as the most comprehensive history of the Knights Templar

Much has been written about the Knights Templar in recent years. A leading specialist in the history of this legendary medieval order now writes a full account of the Knights of the Order of the Temple of Solomon, to give them their full title, bringing the latest findings to a general audience. Putting many of the myths finally to rest, Nicholson recounts a new history of these storm troopers of the papacy, founded during the crusades but who got so rich and influential that they challenged the power of kings.

Biographical Notes

Helen Nicholson is Senior Lecturer in History at Cardiff University. She has published extensively on the Templars and the other Military Orders.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781849011006
  • Publication date: 25 Feb 2010
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: Robinson
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