Related to: 'A Brief Guide to Ghost Hunting'

Robinson

Angels in the Trenches

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie

After a miraculous escape from the German military juggernaut in the small Belgian town of Mons in 1914, the first major battle that the British Expeditionary Force would face in the First World War, the British really believed that they were on the side of the angels. Indeed, after 1916, the number of spiritualist societies in the United Kingdom almost doubled, from 158 to 309. As Arthur Conan Doyle explained, 'The deaths occurring in almost every family in the land brought a sudden and concentrated interest in the life after death. People not only asked the question, "If a man die, shall he live again?" but they eagerly sought to know if communication was possible with the dear ones they had lost.' From the Angel of Mons to the popular boom in spiritualism as the horrors of industrialised warfare reaped their terrible harvest, the paranormal - and its use in propaganda - was one of the key aspects of the First World War.Angels in the Trenches takes us from defining moments, such as the Angel of Mons on the Front Line, to spirit communication on the Home Front, often involving the great and the good of the period, such as aristocrat Dame Edith Lyttelton, founder of the War Refugees Committee, and the physicist Sir Oliver Lodge, Principal of Birmingham University. We see here people at every level of society struggling to come to terms with the ferocity and terror of the war, and their own losses: soldiers looking for miracles on the battlefield; parents searching for lost sons in the séance room. It is a human story of people forced to look beyond the apparent certainties of the everyday - and this book follows them on that journey.

Robinson

The Impossible Zoo

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie
Robinson

A Brief Guide to the Supernatural

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie

From Most Haunted to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, from Underworld to Twilight, from Doom to Resident Evil, The Brief Guide to the Supernatural goes in search of the unearthly with unexpected results; combining history, science, psychology and myth he explores the allure of the paranormal - why so many people still believe in ghosts and angels - as well as the many ways people have tried to contact and record the impossible.

Angus Watson

Angus Watson is the David Gemmell-Award-nominated author of Age of Iron. As well as writing epic fantasy, he's written hundreds of features for newspapers including The Times, Financial Times and Telegraph, and the latter even sent him to look for Bigfoot in America. He lives in London, but you can find him on Twitter at @GusWatson or find his website: www.guswatson.com.

Charles Stross

Charles Stross is a full-time science fiction writer and resident of Edinburgh, Scotland. The author of seven Hugo-nominated novels and winner of three Hugo awards for best novella, two of which are part of the Laundry Files series, Stross's works have been translated into over twelve languages. As the owner of degrees in pharmacy and computer science, he graduated as the world's only academically qualified cyberpunk writer just as cyberpunk died. Today he describes his job as telling lies for money and tormenting his imaginary friends. Follow his blog at http://www.accelerando.org/ and his Twitter feed at @cstross.

Claire North

Claire North is a pseudonym for Catherine Webb, a Carnegie Medal-nominated author whose debut novel was written when she was just fourteen years old. She is fast establishing herself as one of the most powerful and imaginative voices in modern fiction. Her first book published under the Claire North pen name was The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, which became a word-of-mouth bestseller and was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. The follow-up Touch received widespread critical acclaim and was described by the Independent as 'little short of a masterpiece'. Her next novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope won the 2017 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, and her recent book The End of the Day has been shortlisted for the 2017 Sunday Times/PFD Young Writer of the Year Award. She lives in London.

Emma Blair

Emma Blair was a pen name for Scottish actor and author Iain Blair, who began writing in his spare time and whose first novel, Where No Man Cries, was published in 1982. During a writing career spanning three decades he produced some thirty novels, but his true identity remained a secret until 1998 when his novel Flower of Scotland was nominated for the RNA Romantic Novel of the Year award. He was one of Britain's most popular authors and his books among the most borrowed from libraries. Iain Blair died in July 2011.

Fonda Lee

Fonda Lee is a black belt martial artist, a former corporate strategist, and action movie aficionado. Born and raised in Calgary, Canada, she now lives in Portland, Oregon with her family. Lee is the award-winning author of the YA science fiction novels Zeroboxer and Exo; Jade City is her adult debut.

Joyce Meyer

JOYCE MEYER is a #1 New York Times bestselling author and one of the world's leading practical Bible teachers. Her broadcast, Enjoying Everyday Life, airs daily on hundreds of television networks and radio stations worldwide. Joyce has written nearly 100 inspirational books. Bestsellers include God Is Not Mad at You; Making Good Habits, Breaking Bad Habits; Living Beyond Your Feelings; Power Thoughts; Battlefield of the Mind; and The Confident Woman. Joyce holds conferences throughout the year, speaking to thousands around the world.

Judy Finnigan

Judy Finnigan is a bestselling author, television presenter and columnist. Judy's name became synonymous with discovering and sharing great fiction through the Richard and Judy Book Club, where authors including Clare Mackintosh, Liane Moriarty and Victoria Hislop were championed and brought to the attention of millions of readers. Both Judy's previous novels, Eloise and I Do Not Sleep, were Sunday Times Top Ten bestsellers.

Kate Ellis

Kate Ellis was born and brought up in Liverpool and studied drama in Manchester. She is the author of the Wesley Peterson murder mysteries as well as the Joe Plantagenet mysteries and the Albert Lincoln Trilogy set in the aftermath of the Great War.She has twice been shortlisted for the CWA Short Story Dagger and for the CWA Dagger in the Library award.Visit Kate online at: www.kateellis.co.uk

Lucy Ayrton

Lucy Ayrton is Communications Manager of a prisons charity, and much of ONE MORE CHANCE is informed by the people she has met and the time she has spent in prisons, especially on the Holloway Mother and Baby Unit. She has an MA in Creative Writing from Warwick University, and is a lively presence on the performance poetry scene. She wrote and performed two full-length spoken word shows at the Edinburgh Festival: Lullabies to Make Your Children Cry, recipient of the PBH Best Newcomer Award, and adapted into a pamphlet with Stewed Rhubarb Press. The Splitting of the Mermaid was a winner of the Ideastap Members Presents: Preview Season and was performed at Underbelly. She also blogs as Lucy In The Pub With Cider, about literature, feminism and baking. Lucy is lives in Oxford. This is her first novel, and was a finalist for the Exeter Novel Award.

Maria Lewis

Maria Lewis has been working as a professional journalist for the past 10 years. Making the switch from writing about murders to movie stars was not a difficult decision. A former reporter at The Daily Telegraph, she also wrote about all things film and entertainment related as the Showbusiness Reporter for The Daily Mail. Her work has appeared in the New York Post, Empire magazine, Huffington Post, The Sunday Mail, Junkee and BuzzFeed, to name but a few.She appears on 2SER 107.3 FM's weekly Drive segment Gaggle Of Geeks every Wednesday, talking the latest comic book and pop culture news and every Tuesday Breakfast for TV Talk. As a proud member of the Graffiti With Punctuation crew - a collective of Australia's leading film bloggers - she makes up half of the Pod Save Our Screen podcast.Based in Sydney, she lives in a house with too many movie posters and just the right amount of humans. Maria can often be found spending much money on comics, watching horror movies at stupid hours, inhaling books on modern feminist theory (aka anything Caitlin Moran touches) and holding on to the one belief she has had since she was five: that unicorns exist. She is most likely Mark Wahlberg's future wife. Most likely.

N. K. Jemisin

N. K. Jemisin is a Brooklyn-based author and the winner of two Hugo Awards for her novels The Fifth Season and The Obelisk Gate. She previously won the Locus Award for her first novel, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, and her short fiction and novels have been nominated multiple times for Hugo, World Fantasy and Nebula awards, and shortlisted for the Crawford and the James Tiptree, Jr. Awards. She is a science fiction and fantasy reviewer for the New York Times, and you can find her online at nkjemisin.com.

Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful true crime and popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.

Patricia Briggs

Patricia Briggs graduated from Montana State University with degrees in history and German. She worked for a while as a substitute teacher but now writes full-time. Patricia Briggs lives in the Pacific Northwest.

Paula Guran

Paula Guran is the senior editor at Prime Books. She edited the Juno line of fantasy for six years and edits the annual Year's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror series. Guran has won two Bram Stoker Awards and two World Fantasy Award nominations. She lives in Akron, Ohio.

Peter Haining

Peter Haining was a prolific editor of anthologies and collections throughout all subgenres of fiction, and he also wrote his own short stories, recently a series about the Second World War. He collected and edited several books about Sherlock Holmes including The Sherlock Holmes Scrapbook and The Television Sherlock Holmes to tie in with the iconic Jeremy Brett series of the eighties and nineties. He died in 2007.Peter Haining wrote and edited a number of acclaimed books on the supernatural, including Ghosts: The Illustrated History, and A Dictionary of Ghosts, as well as fiction anthologies The Mammoth Book of Modern Ghost Stories. A former publisher and much admired figure, he died in 2007. He lived in a sixteenth-century house in Suffolk that is haunted by the ghost of a Napoleonic prisoner of war.

Peter Kenny

Thirty years working as an actor, musician, designer and director in Theatre and Radio; Peter has worked for: A&BC Theatre Co. The Royal Shakespeare Co. and The BBC Radio Drama Co. An award winning narrator of audio-books he has recorded over 100 titles, everything from: Iain M. Banks, Neil Gaiman, and Andrzej Sapkowski to Claire North, Jonas Jonasson Jeremy Vine and Paul O'Grady. He has worked with many of the major publishing houses including, Little Brown, Orion/Gollancz, Hachette, Harper, Hodder, Pan MacMillan, ISIS, RNIB, Podium and Penguin. Visit www.peterkenny.com @PeterKennyVoice

Sarah Waters

Sarah Waters was born in Wales. She has won a Betty Trask Award, the Somerset Maugham Award and her books have been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Orange Prize. Tipping the Velvet, Affinity, Fingersmith and The Night Watch have been adapted for television. Sarah Waters has been named Author of the Year four times: by the British Book Awards, the Booksellers' Association, Waterstone's Booksellers and the Stonewall Awards. She lives in London.