Jessica Wilson and Stephen Law - Brief Guide - Global Warming, A - Little, Brown Book Group

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Brief Guide - Global Warming, A

By Jessica Wilson and Stephen Law

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

A guide to climate change that not only gives reasonable answers to the big questions surrounding the issue, but also takes us inside the corridors of power and the basements of the United Nations, where countries are engaged in a game of climate-change poker.


It now seems certain that our planet is warming. Is it the result of human activity and if so how do we combat it? This reasoned and reasonable guide helps to clarify the controversial issues and the way forward.


An accessible guide to climate change that not only gives reasonable answers to the big questions surrounding the issue, but also takes us inside the corridors of power and the basements of the United Nations, where countries are engaged in a game of climate-change poker. For the individual, wondering whether to sell their seaside property or invest in a small wind-farm, this book offers sensible answers. It gives us the best and worst case scenarios and sets out how we can each address this contentious but vital issue.

Biographical Notes

Stephen Law is the Director of the Environmental Monitoring Group, a South African policy and dvocacy
non-governmental organization.

Jessica Wilson worked for South Africa's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research on integrated
environmental management and environmental-impact assessments and has over ten years' experience in the area of environmental policy

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781780337081
  • Publication date: 01 Mar 2012
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Robinson
Robinson

Talking to Robots

David Ewing Duncan
Authors:
David Ewing Duncan

Visions of robot futures that feature bots such as robot drivers, the bot that will take your job, psychiatrist and doc bots, sex bots, priest bots, the first robot president, and bot servants; also playthings that in some cases bring out the worst in people; synthetic bio bots that are copies of us; and dystopic bots that may treat us like pets, or worse.Scenarios start with discussions with well-known thinkers, engineers, scientists and philosophers, and their ruminations on future robots and AI systems that they want to meet - or fear to meet - and why. These discussions, along with some examination of bot-tech, bot-history and real-time societal and ethical/moral issues with robots, are the launch pads for unfurling imagined bot futures.The book will describe how various bots work as machines, but also what they say about us as humans. We are at a pivotal moment when our infatuation with human-like beings with certain attributes or super-powers in mythology, religion and sci-fi, is now coinciding with our ability to build these entities for real, so Talking to Robots comes at the perfect moment.David Duncan has interviewed the likes of Kevin Kelly, Stephen Hawking, Brian Greene, Sherry Turkle, Alex Garland, Stephen Pinker, Dean Kaman, Ray Kurzweil, Michio Kaku, Elon Musk, Craig Venter and others. He has researched the topic intensively but wears his knowledge lightly in this dazzlingly thought-provoking, illuminating and entertaining book. Talking to Robots will bring the future to life like no other book in this sphere.

Hachette Books

Our 50-State Border Crisis

Howard G. Buffett
Authors:
Howard G. Buffett

Howard G. Buffett has seen first-hand the devastating impact of cheap Mexican heroin and other opiate cocktails across America. Fueled by failing border policies and lawlessness in Mexico and Central America, drugs are pouring over the nation's southern border in record quantities, turning Americans into addicts and migrants into drug mules--and killing us in record numbers. Politicians talk about a border crisis and an opioid crisis as separate issues. To Buffett, a landowner on the U.S. border with Mexico and now a sheriff in Illinois, these are intimately connected. Ineffective border policies not only put residents in border states like Texas and Arizona in harm's way, they put American lives in states like Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Vermont at risk. Mexican cartels have grown astonishingly powerful by exploiting both the gaps in our border security strategy and the desperation of migrants--all while profiting enormously off America's growing addiction to drugs. The solution isn't a wall. In this groundbreaking book, Buffett outlines a realistic, effective, and bi-partisan approach to fighting cartels, strengthening our national security, and tackling the roots of the chaos below the border.

PublicAffairs

How Safe Are We?

Janet Napolitano, Karen Breslau
Authors:
Janet Napolitano, Karen Breslau

Created in the wake of the greatest tragedy to occur on U.S. soil, the Department of Homeland Security was handed a sweeping mandate: make America safer. It would encompass intelligence and law enforcement agencies, oversee natural disasters, commercial aviation, border security and ICE, cybersecurity, and terrorism, among others. From 2009-2013, Janet Napolitano ran DHS and oversaw 22 federal agencies with 230,000 employees. In How Safe Are We?, Napolitano pulls no punches, reckoning with the critics who call it Frankenstein's Monster of government run amok, and taking a hard look at the challenges we'll be facing in the future. But ultimately, she argues that the huge, multifaceted department is vital to our nation's security. An agency that's part terrorism prevention, part intelligence agency, part law enforcement, public safety, disaster recovery make for an odd combination the protocol-driven, tradition-bound Washington D.C. culture. But, she says, it has made us more safe, secure, and resilient.Napolitano not only answers the titular question, but grapples with how these security efforts have changed our country and society. Where are the failures that leave us vulnerable and what has our 1 trillion dollar investment yielded over the last 15 years? And why haven't we had another massive terrorist attack in the U.S. since September 11th, 2001? In our current political climate, where Donald Trump has politicized nearly every aspect of the department, Napolitano's clarifying, bold vision is needed now more than ever.

Abacus

The Little Italian Bakery

Valentina Cebeni
Authors:
Valentina Cebeni

'A true feast for the senses' Jenny Ashcroft, author of Beneath a Burning SkyThe scent of freshly baked biscuits, lemon and aniseed reminds Elettra of her mother's kitchen. But her mother is in a coma, and the family bakery is failing. Elettra is distraught; she has many unanswered questions about her mother's childhood - Edda was a secretive woman. The only clue is a family heirloom: a necklace inscribed with the name of an island.Elettra buys a one-way ticket to that island, just off the coast of Sardinia. Once there, she discovers a community of women, each lost in their own way. They live in a crumbling convent, under threat from the local mayor and his new development plan. It is within the convent's dark corridors and behind its secret doors that Elettra discovers a connection to her mother's past. She also falls in love again: with friendship, baking and adventure.

PublicAffairs

A Bright Future

Joshua S. Goldstein
Authors:
Joshua S. Goldstein
Seal Press

Forget 'Having It All'

Amy Westervelt
Authors:
Amy Westervelt
Basic Books

1619

James Horn
Authors:
James Horn

1619 offers a new interpretation of the significance of Jamestown in the long trajectory of American history. Jamestown, the cradle of American democracy, also saw the birth of our nation's greatest challenge: the corrosive legacy of slavery and racism that have deepened and entrenched stark inequalities in our society. After running Jamestown under martial law from 1610-1616, the Virginia Company turned toward representative government in an effort to provide settlers with more control over their own affairs and more incentive to invest further in the colony. Governor Edwin Sandys dreamed of creating a real commonwealth, to provide for the interests of settlers and Indians alike. Thus, in late July 1619, the newly-formed General Assembly gathered to introduce "just Laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people." It was the first legislature in America, and history has cast it as the foundation of American freedom and democracy. From that moment on, propertied white colonists became accustomed to freedoms that would have been unthinkable in England with its layers of customs and hierarchy of courts and regulations, and these expanding political and economic freedoms attracted countless British immigrants and other Europeans to Virginia and the American colonies. But those very freedoms also permitted the wholesale and largely unchecked exploitation of poor white laborers and non-European peoples. More than nine-tenths of all those arriving in Virginia at this time were brought in some form of servitude or labor contract. In a cruel irony, 1619 also saw the arrival of the first African slaves in Virginia. The establishment of the General Assembly did nothing to ameliorate these disparities, but rather put ever more power in the hands of local grandees. Sandys's dream of creating a commonwealth in the interests of settlers and Indians proved short-lived. But the twin pillars of democracy-the rule of law and representative government based on the consent of the people-survived and flourished. It was his greatest legacy to America. What was lost was his steadfast conviction that serving the common good served all. This is a pattern we recognize all too well in modern American society-opportunities are not shared, inequality is rampant, racism is systemic. We would like to think these are problems that can be solved by expanding representative democracy; Jamestown teaches us, instead, that these are problems have long been created and encouraged by American democracy. Casting a skeptical eye on deeply-cherished myths, 1619 will be essential reading for anyone struggling to understand the paradox of American freedom.

Hachette Books

Quench

Dana Cohen, Gina Bria
Authors:
Dana Cohen, Gina Bria

Chronic headaches...brain fog...fatigue...weight gain...insomnia...gut pain...autoimmune conditions. We may think these and other all-too-common modern maladies are due to gluten intake or too much sugar or too little exercise. But there is another missing piece to the health puzzle: Proper hydration. Yes, even in this era of Poland Spring many of us are dehydrated due to moisture lacking diets, artificial environments, medications, and over-dependence on water as our only source of hydration. For this reason, that new diet or exercise plan may fail because our body doesn't have enough moisture to support it.Quench presents a wellness routine that can reverse all of that, based on breakthrough new science in the field of hydration. Readers will be surprised to learn that drinking too much water can flush out vital nutrients and electrolytes. Here is where "gel water" comes in: the water from plants (like cucumber, berries, aloe), which our bodies are designed to truly absorb right down to the cellular level. In fact, Ms. Bria's work as an anthropologist led her to the realization that desert people stay hydrated almost exclusively from what they eat, including gel plants like cactus.Based on groundbreaking science from the University of Washington's Pollack Water Lab and other research, Quench offers a five-day jump start plan: hydrating meal plans and the heart of the program, smoothies and elixirs using the most hydrating and nutrient-packed plants. Another unique feature of their approach is micro-movements-small, simple movements you can make a few times a day that will move water through your fascia, the connective tissue responsible for hydrating our bodies. You will experience more energy, focus, and better digestion within five days...then move onto the lifetime plan for continued improvements, even elimination of symptoms.

Basic Books

Discrimination and Disparities

Thomas Sowell
Authors:
Thomas Sowell

A searching re-examination of the assumptions, and the evidence for and against, current approaches to issues of economic and other disparitiesDiscrimination and Disparities challenges believers in such one-factor explanations of economic outcome differences as discrimination, exploitation or genetics. It is readable enough for people with no prior knowledge of economics. Yet the empirical evidence with which it backs up its analysis spans the globe and challenges beliefs across the ideological spectrum.The point of Discrimination and Disparities is not to recommend some particular policy "fix" at the end, but to clarify why so many policy fixes have turned out to be counterproductive, and to expose some seemingly invincible fallacies behind many counterproductive policies.The final chapter deals with social visions and their human consequences.

PublicAffairs

The Smartest Places on Earth

Antoine van Agtmael, Fred Bakker
Authors:
Antoine van Agtmael, Fred Bakker

Antoine van Agtmael coined the term "emerging markets" and built a career and a multibillion-dollar investing firm centered on these surging economies that would, over time, supplant the West as engines of wealth and prosperity. The trend held for decades, but a few years ago van Agtmael and Alfred Bakker, a renowned European journalist, began seeing signs that the tide might be turning. For example, during a visit to an enormously successful chip company in Taiwan, the company's leaders told them that their American competitors were now eating their lunch. And Taiwan was not the only place giving them this message.Thus began a remarkable two-year journey to reassess the conventional wisdom that the United States and Europe are yesterday's story and to determine whether there something profound is happening that points the way to the creation of the next economy. In The Smartest Places on Earth, van Agtmael and Bakker present a truly hopeful and inspiring investigation into the emerging sources of a new era of competitiveness for America and Europe that are coming from unlikely places--those cities and areas once known as "rustbelts" that have, from an economic perspective, been written off. Take Akron, Ohio, whose economy for decades was dependent on industries such as tire manufacturing, a product now made cheaply elsewhere. In Akron and other such communities, a combination of forces--including visionary thinkers, government initiatives, start-ups making real products, and even big corporations--have succeeded in creating what van Agtmael and Bakker call a "brainbelt." These brainbelts depend on a collaborative work style that is unique to the societies and culture of America and Europe, since they involve levels of trust and freedom of thinking that can't be replicated elsewhere. They are producing products and technologies that are transforming industries such as vehicles and transportation, farming and food production, medical devices and health care.For several decades, American and European industry focused on cost by outsourcing production to those emerging markets that can make things cheaper. The tide has now turned toward being smart, as van Agtmael and Bakker report, and the next emerging market, may, in fact, be the West.

Nation Books

Fifty Million Rising

Saadia Zahidi
Authors:
Saadia Zahidi

While the news out of the Muslim world has been focused on the threat of extremism from ISIS and Al Qaeda, a quiet but powerful shift has been taking place among women. In the last 10 years alone, nearly 50 million Muslim women have entered the workforce, arming them with more purchasing and earning power and giving them greater autonomy. Saadia Zahidi, a Senior Director at the World Economic Forum, argues that these profound changes will not only empower women; they will also revolutionize and strengthen the economies of their countries. Zahidi documents this revolution through the stories of the remarkable women who are at the forefront of this shift, from McDonald's workers in Pakistan, to middle class software technicians in Egypt, to the heads of global Saudi conglomerates. Zahidi calculates that if female labor participation rose to Western levels, the GDP of many Middle East regions would spike dramatically.The implications are enormous. As businesses learn how to integrate the new female talent pool, their business models will need to adapt to accommodate their new consumers and their new talent. New businesses are already beginning to emerge that cater to women's purchasing power, creating new opportunities for female entrepreneurs, and growing the health, education, food, beverage, and retail sectors that are critical to a diversified, stable economy. At the same time, the new economic and social power of women will force the hands of politicians and policymakers who still consider women second class citizens. Many of these women face a backlash from conservative voices and even members of their families. But because this is an economic revolution, Zahidi argues that it will endure, overcoming cultural mores and forever remaking these societies in ways that we, too, can learn from.

Piatkus

Unscaled

Hemant Taneja
Authors:
Hemant Taneja

'A thought-provoking look at the technology that is changing the world of business and the benefits, pitfalls, and challenges for society as a whole.' -- Kenneth I. Chenault, former chief executive officer, American Express CompanyThroughout the twentieth century, technology and economics drove a dominant logic: bigger was almost always better. It was smart to scale up - to take advantage of classic economies of scale.But in the unscaled economy, size and scale have become a liability. Today's most successful companies - Uber, Airbnb, Amazon, Salesforce - have defied the traditional 'economies of scale' approach by renting scale instead of spending vast amounts of money building it. And a new generation of upstarts is using artificial intelligence to automate tasks that once required expensive investment, enabling them to grow big without the bloat of giant organisations.In Unscaled, Hemant Taneja convincingly shows how the unscaled economy is remaking massive, deeply-rooted industries and opening up fantastic possibilities for entrepreneurs, imaginative companies and resourceful individuals. Beyond that, it can be the model for solving some of the world's greatest problems, including climate change and soaring healthcare costs, potentially reversing many of the ills brought on by mass industrialization.The unscale wave has only just started. To succeed in business today, companies, CEOs and leaders everywhere must unlearn what they have been taught - they must embrace an unscaled mindset.

Little, Brown

Plucked!

Maryn McKenna
Authors:
Maryn McKenna
Robinson

How Much Brain Do We Really Need?

Jenny Barnett, Alexis Willett
Authors:
Jenny Barnett, Alexis Willett

Your brain is shrinking. Does it matter?How Much Brain Do We Really Need? challenges us to think differently about the brain. Rather than just concentrating on the many wonderful things it can do, this entertaining insight into the complexities and contradictions of the human brain asks whether in fact we can live satisfactorily without some of it.The bad news is that our brains start to shrink from our mid-thirties. But the good news is that we still seem to generally muddle along and our brain is able to adapt in extraordinary ways when things going wrong.Alexis Willett and Jennifer Barnett shed light on what the human brain can do - in both optimal and suboptimal conditions - and consider what it can manage without. Through fascinating facts and figures, case studies and hypothetical scenarios, expert interviews and scientific principles, they take us on a journey from the ancient mists of time to the far reaches of the future, via different species and lands.Is brain training the key to healthy ageing? Do women really experience 'baby brain'? Is our brain at its evolutionary peak or do we have an even more brilliant future to look forward to? We discover the answers to these questions and more.

Nation Books

Real Impact

Morgan Simon
Authors:
Morgan Simon
PublicAffairs

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow
Authors:
Roger Thurow
Constable

On Intelligence

John Hughes-Wilson
Authors:
John Hughes-Wilson

This book is a professional military-intelligence officer's and a controversial insider's view of some of the greatest intelligence blunders of recent history. It includes the serious developments in government misuse of intelligence in the recent war with Iraq. Colonel John Hughes-Wilson analyses not just the events that conspire to cause disaster, but why crucial intelligence is so often ignored, misunderstood or spun by politicians and seasoned generals alike. This book analyses: how Hitler's intelligence staff misled him in a bid to outfox their Nazi Party rivals; the bureaucratic bungling behind Pearl Harbor; how in-fighting within American intelligence ensured they were taken off guard by the Viet Cong's 1968 Tet Offensive; how over confidence, political interference and deception facilitated Egypt and Syria's 1973 surprise attack on Israel; why a handful of marines and a London taxicab were all Britain had to defend the Falklands; the mistaken intelligence that allowed Saddam Hussein to remain in power until the second Iraq War of 2003; the truth behind the US failure to run a terrorist warning system before the 9/11 WTC bombing; and how governments are increasingly pressurising intelligence agencies to 'spin' the party-political line.

Fleet

Now and Again

Charlotte Rogan
Authors:
Charlotte Rogan

A gripping novel about what happens when one women stands up for her beliefsFrom the author of The Lifeboat and Now and Again 'Dazzling' - The Sunday Times 'All the ingredients of a tense thriller' - Red For Maggie Rayburn, wife, mother and secretary at a munitions plant, life is pleasant, predictable and secure. When she finds proof of a high-level cover-up on her boss's desk, she impulsively takes it, turning her world upside down. Propelled by a desire to do good - and a new-found taste for excitement - Maggie starts to see injustice everywhere. Soon, her bottom drawer is filled with 'evidence', her town has turned against her, and she must decide how far she will go for the truth.

Corsair

Time to Win

Harry Brett
Authors:
Harry Brett
Abacus

The End of Alchemy

Mervyn King
Authors:
Mervyn King

'A fearless and important book . . . The End of Alchemy isn't just an elegant guide to the history of economic ideas. It also gives a genuine insider's account' TelegraphThe past twenty years saw unprecedented growth and stability followed by the worst financial crisis the industrialised world has ever witnessed. In the space of little more than a year what had been seen as the age of wisdom was viewed as the age of foolishness. Almost overnight, belief turned into incredulity. Most accounts of the recent crisis focus on the symptoms and not the underlying causes of what went wrong. But those events, vivid though they remain in our memories, comprised only the latest in a long series of financial crises since our present system of commerce became the cornerstone of modern capitalism. Alchemy explains why, ultimately, this was and remains a crisis not of banking - even if we need to reform the banking system - nor of policy-making - even if mistakes were made - but of ideas. In this refreshing and vitally important book, former governor of the Bank of England Mervyn King - an actor in this drama - proposes revolutionary new concepts to answer the central question: are money and banking a form of Alchemy or are they the Achilles heel of a modern capitalist economy?