Related to: 'Statistical'

Da Capo Lifelong Books

You Get What You Pitch For

Anthony Sullivan, Tim Vandehey
Authors:
Anthony Sullivan, Tim Vandehey

Pitching is about persuasion: radiating positivity, controlling the situation, winning an audience's trust, creating "fierce agreement," and getting them to want to give you what you're asking for. Written not just for a business audience, You Get What You Pitch For will approach the pitch as what it really is: a methodology for building productive, positive, mutually beneficial person-to-person interactions. Pitchman Anthony "Sully" Sullivan and co-author Tim Vandehey weave a lifetime of vivid stories and colorful characters, one-of-a-kind pitchman-lingo, and field-tested pitching techniques into an entertaining, practical, put-this-material-to-work-today user's manual for an extraordinary set of skills that millions of people can use to become the most confident, charismatic and powerful version of themselves. You Get What You Pitch For tackles common, real-life scenarios almost anyone can relate to, from handling disagreements, job interviews, making an important speech, getting funding, going after a promotion, and more.

PublicAffairs

The End of Loyalty

Rick Wartzman
Authors:
Rick Wartzman

In the current era of intense global competition, advancing technology, weakness in organized labor and a worshiping of "shareholder value," the idea of a corporate social contract in America has become largely a myth. Most big companies seek to minimize their commitments to employees, as job security, pay, healthcare and pensions have all taken a severe hit. The few that invest in worker morale and culture-such as Google-are hailed as bold and innovative. But they don't tend to employ many people.In this richly detailed and eye-opening book, Rick Wartzman shows that for many of America's greatest companies, it wasn't always this way. As WWII drew to a close, General Motors, General Electric, Kodak and Coca-Cola were among the nation's business giants that took responsibility for providing their workers and retirees with an array of social benefits, erecting what was essentially a private welfare state. These companies also believed that worker pay needed to be kept high in order to preserve morale and the quality of their product-as well as keep the economy humming. And, of course, productivity boomed.But it wasn't to last. By tracing the ups and downs of these four corporate icons over 70 years, Wartzman tells the story of the rise and fall of the social contact between employer and employee in America. As the narrative unspools, Wartzman works through the Golden Age of the '50s and '60s, the turbulent years of the '70s and '80s, and the rise of downsizing, outsourcing and instability that characterizes so many current companies. Taken together, these many acts comprise a kind of biography of the American Dream gone sideways.Told with energy and insight, The End of Loyalty shows that capitalism wasn't always the unfettered system that so many grieve about today, and makes the case that it doesn't have to stay that way.

Little, Brown US

The Seventh Sense

Joshua Cooper Ramo
Authors:
Joshua Cooper Ramo
Constable

Empire of the Summer Moon

S.C. Gwynne
Authors:
S.C. Gwynne

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second is the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a nine-year-old girl who was kidnapped by Comanches in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne's account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told.

Angela Huth

Angela Huth has written three short story collections and several novels. She also writes plays for radio, television and stage, and is a well-known freelance journalist, critic and broadcaster. She is married to a don, lives in Oxford and has two daughters.

Anthony Sullivan

Anthony Sullivan is an English entrepreneur and pitchman best known as the leading spokesman for the OxiClean brand. His production company, Sullivan Productions, Inc., produces TV commercials for consumer products.

Cal Turner Jr.

Cal Turner, Jr. grew up in a Scottsville, Kentucky, household where business and family were one. After graduating Vanderbilt University, he served for three years as an officer in the United States Navy before beginning his career at Dollar General. He served as CEO for 37 years, and during his tenure, the number of DG stores rose from 150, with sales of $40 million, to more than 6,000, with sales in excess of $6 billion. Turner has served on the boards of companies like Shoney's and First American, and of educational, civic and charitable organizations including Vanderbilt and Fisk universities, and has been president of the board of governors of the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce. His many awards include the Presidential Award for Private Sector Initiatives (presented by Ronald Reagan) and the Vanderbilt Distinguished Alumnus Award. A committed lifelong Methodist, Turner was inducted in 2001 into the Fellows of the Society of John Wesley by the Tennessee Conference of the UMC.

Charlie Mortimer

Charlie Mortimer was born in 1952 and educated at Wellesley House, Broadstairs and (reluctantly) Eton. He has been, among other things, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, a vintage car restorer, an estate agent, a roughneck on an oil rig, a pop group manager, a mechanic in Africa, a manufacturer of boxer shorts and an antiques dealer. He currently describes himself as a 'middle aged, middle class spiv (mostly retired)'.

Chrissie Wellington

CHRISSIE WELLINGTON is the world-record holder for ironman-distance triathlon. She is a four-time Ironman Triathlon World Champion, having won the World Championship consecutively in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and regaining it in 2011. She remains undefeated over the Ironman distance.

Keith Stuart

Keith Stuart is an author and journalist. His heartwarming debut novel, A Boy Made of Blocks, was a Richard and Judy Book Club pick and a major bestseller, and was inspired by Keith's real-life relationship with his autistic son. Keith has written for publications including Empire, Red and Esquire, and is the former games editor of the Guardian. He lives with his wife and two sons in Frome, Somerset.

Kim Jones

Kim Jones is a freelance journalist specialising in the health and wellbeing area. She writes for various national women's magazines and newspapers including The Daily Mirror, the Sunday Express Magazine, Woman's Weekly, Tesco Magazine and Woman and Home. Kim lives in Cardiff with her partner, their two sons, a cat and cocker spaniel. You can find out more about Kim and her work here: www.kimjoneswrites.co.uk

Liz Strachan

Liz Strachan taught mathematics for 36 years in her home town of Montrose, Scotland. She has had over a hundred articles and short stories published and won a scholarship from the Scottish Association of Writers in 2008.

Mike Brearley

Mike Brearley OBE was educated at Cambridge, where he read classics and moral sciences, and captained the university. He played for Middlesex County Cricket Club intermittently from 1961 to 1983, captaining the side from 1971 to 1982. He first played for England in 1976 and captained the side from 1977 to 1980, winning seventeen test matches and losing only four. He was recalled to the captaincy in 1981 for the Ashes home series, leading England to one of their most famous victories. Since retiring from cricket in 1982, he trained and continues to work as a psychoanalyst, and is a lecturer on leadership and motivation. He is the author of the bestselling The Art of Captaincy, and has written on cricket and the psychology of sport for the Observer and most recently The Times. He lives in London.

Rick Wartzman

Rick Wartzman is a Senior Advisor at the Drucker Institute, where he was Executive Director until early 2016. His books include Obscene in the Extreme, The King of California, and What Would Drucker Do Now? A former writer and editor at the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Times, he currently comments on the future of work for Fortune online. He lives in Los Angeles.

Rob Simbeck

Rob Simbeck is a writer and editor of over 20 books. He was ghostwriter of Cal Turner's first book, co-written with Howard Olds, Led To Follow.

Sam Beckbessinger

Sam Beckbessinger is a writer and fintech entrepreneur who has spent most of the past ten years building tools to help people manage their money better. Sam also writes fiction and once high-fived Barack Obama (true story). She lives in Cape Town, South Africa.

Sarah Brewer

Dr. Sarah Brewer is a recognised expert on sensible supplementation and a respected health journalist. She is the author of over 30 popular health books.

Sir John Hargrave

Sir John Hargrave is the CEO of Media Shower, the media company that specialises in blockchain. He oversees a team of 75 analysts, journalists and editors who rate, analyse and review blockchain projects for companies and investors. He is a frequent speaker, lecturer and connector at blockchain conferences around the world.

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of dozens of books and the recipient of various awards, including the National Humanities Medal, Presented by the President of the United States in 2003.

Tim Vandehey

Tim Vandehey is a bestselling ghostwriter and co-author. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his wife and daughters