Related to: 'A Dead Man in Malta'

Constable

A Dead Man in Tangier

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce
Constable

A Dead Man in Barcelona

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce

Barcelona, 1912. A city still recovering from the dramatic incidents of the so-called 'Tragic Week' when Catalonian conscripts bound for the unpopular war in Spanish Morocco had rebelled at the city's dockside against the royalist forces. In the fighting, many were killed, and afterwards, even more put in prison. Including an Englishman, who was later found dead in his cell.The dead man had been a prominent businessman in Gibraltar, so what had he been doing in Barcelona? What part did he play in the illicit three-way trade between Gibraltar, Spanish Morocco and Barcelona? And just how did he really meet his end - murdered, in a prison cell?The case, in Gibraltar's view, crys out for investigation - and by someone independent of the Spanish authorities. So Scotland Yard are summoned to send out one of their men - but who? Seymour ticks all the right boxes - he has experience of the tangled diplomatic world of that part of the Mediterranean. He speaks foreign languages. And possibly most importantly of all - he grew up near the docks of London's East End so with any luck, knows how to swim if pushed in the water...PRAISE FOR MICHAEL PEARCE'S A DEAD MAN IN... SERIES'His sympathetic portrayal of an unfamiliar culture, impeccable historical detail and entertaining dialogue make enjoyable reading.' Sunday Telegraph'The steady pace, atmospheric design, and detailed description re-create a complicated city. Arecommended historical series.' Library Journal'Sheer fun.' The Times

Constable

A Dead Man in Istanbul

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce

From the author of the award-winning Mamur Zapt books, the second in a new series introducing Seymour of Special Branch and set in the British embassies and Consulates of Europe in the early 1900s. The Second Secretary of the Embassy in Istanbul has died in decidedly strange circumstances while attempting to swim the Dardanelles Straits, the passage between Europe and Asia, heavily used by warships, liners, tankers and cargo vessels of all kinds. A romantic attempt to repeat the legendary feat of Leander, as the Embassy says? Or an attempt to spy out a possible landing place for a British military expedition, as the Turks insist? Whichever, Cunningham has ended up with a bullet in his head. The suspicious circumstances of his death have to be investigated so the Foreign Office sends out an officer of the Special Branch: Seymour. As Seymour tries to untangle the threads which lead to Cunningham's death, their ends lead him into all parts of the city, from the little box shops of the Avenue of Slippers to Les Petits Champs des Morts, where fashionable Turkish ladies loiter among the tombs to eat sweets; from the crowded coffee houses around the Galata Bridge where men sit all day smoking bubble pipes to the heart of the Topkapi Palace itself.

Constable

A Dead Man in Trieste

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce

Trieste in 1906 is of vital strategic importance and one of the world's greatest seaports. But assorted nationalist movements are threatening to pull the place apart and the militarist regime has trouble keeping a lid on things. Amid all the chaos the British consul goes missing, and Special Branch Seymour is sent to find him. Born to an immigrant family in London's East End, Seymour has an acute linguistic ear - crucial in turn-of-the-century Trieste. As he attempts to solve the riddle of the consul's disappearance, Seymour discovers dark and disturbing corners of the city and finds that it holds the secrets of his own family's past.

Constable

A Dead Man in Athens

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce

This title is set in Athens, 1913, the capital of a country on the brink of war. The new Greek prime minister, Venizelos, tired of the Ottoman overlords, has what he calls the Great Idea - a vision of a new Greece which unites all the Greek people scattered around the Mediterranean. Not such a great idea, in the view of other countries, among them Britain, which believes in letting sleeping dogs lie. And cats. Including the one recently poisoned in Athens and which belonged to the exiled former Sultan. Unfortunately, as is the way with the Balkans, rumours start flying around; one being that this was a sighting shot for the ex-Sultan himself. This, in the Balkans, could start a war and so Britain has to sit up and take notice. Something has to be done. Fast. And - please, urge the diplomats - low-key. The lowest key of all is to send out a police officer from Scotland Yard to investigate, and, as it happens, the Foreign Office has a person in mind: Seymour, of the CID, who has had some experience of this sort of thing before...

Constable

A Dead Man in Naples

Michael Pearce
Authors:
Michael Pearce

Naples, 1913. Sun-baked, blue-skied, and with its amazing bay, one of the most beautiful spots in Italy - but also, one of the most backward. Into that world is sent a minor British consular official, Scampion, banished from Florence because he has allowed himself to be caught up in the mad social whirl surrounding D'Annunzio, the famous Italian poet, Nationalist and revolutionary.Scampion brings with him from Florence the new craze that is sweeping Italy: bicycling. And one day as he walks home after a road race that he has been organising, he is stabbed to death.Nothing extraordinary about that in Naples - it happens all the time - but his wallet was not taken, a fact that is remarkable. Could Scampion's murder have something to do with the racing? Bicycling may seem like a harmless pursuit but in Italy passions run high and Neopolitans, too, are great gamblers; they gamble on anything, including bicycle races. And where there is gambling, in Naples there is usually the Camorra, the powerful Neopolitan secret society.But then the Foreign Office receives a tip off that the murder may be more complicated. It might be linked to high politics in Rome. And that's when Seymour, the foreigner from the F.O., is sent south to investigate . . .Praise for Michael Pearce's A Dead Man in . . . series'The steady pace, atmospheric design, and detailed description re-create a complicated city. A recommended historical series' Library Journal'Sheer fun' The Times'His sympathetic portrayal of an unfamiliar culture, impeccable historical detail and entertaining dialogue make enjoyable reading' Sunday Telegraph

A.D. Garrett

A.D. Garrett is the pseudonym for prize-winning novelist Margaret Murphy, working in consultation with policing and forensics expert, Helen Pepper. Margaret Murphy has written 9 internationally published psychological thrillers - both stand-alone and police series. She is Writing Fellow and Reading Round Lector for the Royal Literary Fund, past Chair of the Crime Writers Association (CWA), and founder of Murder Squad. A CWA Short Story Dagger winner, she has been shortlisted for the First Blood critics' award for crime fiction as well as the CWA Dagger in the Library. Her lifelong passion for science is reflected in her painstaking research for her novels. In 2013, writing as A.D. Garrett, Margaret began a new forensic series, featuring Professor Nick Fennimore and DCI Kate Simms. Everyone Lies, which Ann Cleeves rated 'thriller writing at its best', was a bestseller, and Believe No One, was described by Publishers' Weekly as a 'stellar thriller'. Truth Will Out, the third in the series, is due for publication November 2016. Helen Pepper is a Senior Lecturer in Policing at Teesside University. She has been an analyst, Forensic Scientist, Scene of Crime Officer, CSI, and Crime Scene Manager. As a Crime Scene Investigator, she examined over 3000 crime scenes, ranging from thefts and fires to rapes and murders. Later, as Crime Scene Manager for Durham Police, she supervised CSIs in over 50 major incidents. An author in her own right, Helen has co-authored, as well as contributed to, professional policing texts. Her expertise is in great demand with crime writers: she has been a judge for the CWA's Non-Fiction Dagger award since 2010, and is Forensic Consultant on both the Vera and Shetland TV series. Website: www.adgarrett.com Follow A.D. Garrett on Twitter: @adgarrett1

A. J. McCreanor

A. J. McCreanor, who also writes as Anne Randall, was born in Glasgow and after university taught English in various secondary schools in inner Glasgow. In 2011 she won first prize for crime fiction writing at the Wells Literature Festival. She now lives in Glastonbury with her husband, two cats and one dog.Riven, the first book in the Wheeler and Ross series, was written under A. J. McCreanor, while further books in series are written under the name Anne Randall.

Andrea Carter

Andrea Carter graduated in Law from Trinity College, Dublin. She qualified as a solicitor and moved to the Inishowen peninsula where she lived and worked for a number of years. In 2005 she transferred to the Bar and moved to Dublin to practise as a barrister. She grew up in Ballyfin, Co Laois. Death at Whitewater Church is her first novel.

Anja de Jager

Anja de Jager is a London-based native Dutch speaker who writes in English. She draws inspiration from cases that her father, a retired police detective, worked on in the Netherlands. Anja worked in the City for twenty years but is now a full-time writer. She is currently working on the next Lotte Meerman novel.

Barbara Cleverly

Barbara Cleverly was born in the north of England and is a graduate of Durham University. A former teacher, she has spent her working life in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk; she now lives in Cambridge. She has one son and five step-children.Her Joe Sandilands series of books set against the background of the Indian Empire was inspired by the contents of a battered old tin trunk that she found in her attic. Out of it spilled two centuries of memories of a family - especially a great uncle who spent a lot of time in India - whose exploits and achievements marched in time with the flowering of the British Empire.To find out more about the series, visit www.barbaracleverly.com.

Carola Dunn

Carola Dunn is the author of the hugely popular mysteries featuring Daisy Dalrymple. Born and raised in England, the author now lives in Eugene, Oregon, USA.

Chris Brookmyre

Chris Brookmyre was a journalist before becoming a full-time novelist with the publication of his award-winning debut Quite Ugly One Morning, which established him as one of Britain's leading crime authors. His Jack Parlabane novels have sold more than one million copies in the UK alone.

Danny Miller

Danny was born in Brighton and studied English and Drama at Goldsmiths College, University of London. As a playwright he's had his work performed at the National Theatre Studio, Bush Theatre and Theatre Royal Stratford East. As a scriptwriter he's worked for the BBC, ITV and Channel 4.Kiss Me Quick (2011) was his first novel and the first in a detective series featuring Vince Treadwell. It was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger Awards 2011 and was highly commended by the judges.

David Dickinson

David Dickinson was born in Dublin. With an honours degree in Classics from Cambridge, David Dickinson joined the BBC, where he became editor of Newsnight and Panorama, as well as series editor for Monarchy, a three-part programme on the British royal family.

Garry Douglas Kilworth

Garry Kilworth was raised in South Yemen, the son of an RAF sergeant, and later served in the RAF himself. He was most recently with the British Army in Hong Kong, where he wrote for the South China Morning Post. He has won numerous awards for both his children's and adult fiction.Garry Douglas Kilworth was raised in South Yemen, the son of an RAF sergeant. He served fifteen years in the RAF himself, and was with the British Army in Hong Kong, where he wrote for the South China Morning Post. He now spends his time between Suffolk and Spain, writing full time, and has won many awards.

Iris Collier

Iris Collier is the daughter of a professional musician and was educated at Newnham College, Cambridge, where she read history. She taught creative writing in Chichester for a number of years and now lives in Boxgrove, England, where she researches and writes history books and thrillers. She is very interested in the rich history of England, and in particular, the history of the local priory at Boxgrove, where she gives guided tours. Boxgrove Priory and its environs provided much of the background and inspiration for Day of Wrath, her first historical crime novel. Iris is married to a former diplomat, and has traveled a great deal throughout her married life. She has two grown children and one grandson.

Julie Kramer

Julie Kramer is a freelance television news producer for NBC's Today show, Nightly News and Dateline. Prior to that, she was a national award-winning investigative producer for WCCO-TV in Minneapolis. She lives in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, with her husband and sons. Visit her at www.juliekramerbooks.com

Julie Wassmer

Julie Wassmer is a a professional televison drama writer, working on various series including ITV's London's Burning, C5's Family Affairs and BBC's Eastenders - which she worked on for 20 years. In 2010, her autobiography More Than Just Coincidence was published by Harper Collins/True.

M.C. Beaton

M.C. Beaton is the author of both the Agatha Raisin and Hamish Macbeth series, as well as numerous Regency romances. Her Agatha Raisin books are currently being turned into a TV series on Sky. She lives in Paris and in a Cotswold village that is very much like Agatha's beloved Carsely.