Ludmilla Jordanova - Physicians and their Images - Little, Brown Book Group

Physicians and their Images

By Ludmilla Jordanova

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The eighth book in the 500 Reflections on the RCP series, looking at the beautiful art owned and curated by the Royal College of Physicians.

The Royal College of Physicians celebrates its 500th anniversary in 2018, and to observe this landmark is publishing this series of ten books. Each of the books focuses on fifty themed elements that have contributed to making the RCP what it is today, together adding up to 500 reflections on 500 years. Some of the people, ideas, objects and manuscripts featured are directly connected to the College, while others have had an influence that can still be felt in its work.


This, the eighth book in the series looks at the art and portraits of the Royal College.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781408706374
  • Publication date: 22 Feb 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Little, Brown
Robinson

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Authors:
Michele J. Gelfand

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Robinson

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Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

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Contributors:
Mark Bryant, Stanley McMurtry

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Little, Brown

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Krishna Chinthapalli

Hachette Books

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Authors:
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Little, Brown

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Alastair Compston
Authors:
Alastair Compston
Hachette Australia

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Authors:
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Basic Books

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Authors:
Jason Sokol

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Virago

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Contributors:
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Robinson

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Authors:
James Morton

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Constable

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Authors:
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Robinson

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Robinson

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Little, Brown

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FaithWords

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Authors:
Sarah Thebarge

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Fleet

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Abacus

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Authors:
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Twelve

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Authors:
David Friend
Hachette Australia

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Authors:
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PublicAffairs

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Authors:
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