Taylor Downing - Spies In The Sky - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780349123400
    • Publication date:02 Aug 2012

Spies In The Sky

The Secret Battle for Aerial Intelligence during World War II

By Taylor Downing

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Available now in paperback, this is the thrilling story of the brains behind those who helped Britain win WW2. A sister story to Bletchley Park and Enigma.

SPIES IN THE SKY is the thrilling, little-known story of the partner organisation to the famous code-breaking centre at Bletchley Park. It is the story of the daring reconnaissance pilots who took aerial photographs over Occupied Europe during the most dangerous days of the Second World War, and of the photo interpreters who invented a completely new science to analyse those pictures. They were inventive and ingenious; they pioneered the development of 3D photography and their work provided vital intelligence throughout the war.

With a whole host of colourful characters at its heart, from the legendary pilot Adrian 'Warby' Warburton, who went missing while on a mission, to photo interpreters Glyn Daniel, later a famous television personality, and Winston Churchill's daughter, Sarah, SPIES IN THE SKY is compelling reading and the first full account of the story of aerial photography and the intelligence gleaned from it in nearly fifty years.

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  • ISBN: 9780748128099
  • Publication date: 15 Sep 2011
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Abacus
Spies in the Sky fills in a huge gap in Second World War historiography in both an exciting and intellectually stimulating way. — Andrew Roberts, author of The Storm of War
A fascinating read and a significant contribution to the history of the Second World War. — Professor David Reynolds, author of In Command of History
Taylor Downing's brilliant research has created a ripping yarn. — Kevin Wilson, Sunday Express
Spies in the Sky . . . combines the breathless courage of pilots . . . with the mild eccentricity of RAF Medmenham. — Sinclair McKay, Daily Telegraph
Spies in the Sky gives a new perspective to some of the most famous moments of the conflict. — Robert McCrum, Observer
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