Michael Walsh and Don Jordan - The King's Revenge - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748126545
    • Publication date:28 Aug 2012

The King's Revenge

Charles II and the Greatest Manhunt in British History

By Michael Walsh and Don Jordan

  • Paperback
  • £11.99

A blistering narrative of one of the most exciting periods in British history that will appeal to readers of historical fiction and non-fiction alike.

When Charles I was executed, his son Charles II made it his role to search out retribution, producing the biggest manhunt Britain had ever seen, one that would span Europe and America and would last for thirty years.

Men who had once been among the most powerful figures in England ended up on the scaffold, on the run, or in fear of the assassin's bullet. History has painted the regicides and their supporters as fanatical Puritans, but among them were remarkable men, including John Milton and Oliver Cromwell. Don Jordan and Michael Walsh bring these remarkable figures and this astonishing story vividly to life an engrossing, bloody tale of plots, spies, betrayal, fear and ambition.

Biographical Notes

Don Jordan and Michael Walsh have each won awards for investigative journalism. Don Jordan has twice won a Blue Ribbon Award at the New York Film and Television Festival and Michael Walsh has won a Royal Television Society Award. Together they have written three books, including White Cargo, acclaimed by Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison as an 'extraordinary book'.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349123769
  • Publication date: 01 Aug 2013
  • Page count: 400
  • Imprint: Abacus
Jordan and Walsh provide a thoroughly entertaining account of these extraordinary events . . . a vivid and consuming piece of historical narrative — Andrew Holgate, Sunday Times
A fast-paced, lively work — BBC History Magazine
In this beautifully detailed and seamlessly written book Jordan and Walsh shine a new light on Charles II . . . their energetic and masterful account makes for a Restoration romp worth reading — Sunday Express
This is a terrific read — Spectator
An absorbing history packed with more plotting than an episode of The Borgias. — Booklist
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