Stanley Weintraub - Pearl Harbor Christmas - Little, Brown Book Group

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Pearl Harbor Christmas

A World at War, December 1941

By Stanley Weintraub

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock- in some cases overseas, elation- was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody's mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen in grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where they jointly lit the White House Christmas tree. As the two Allied leaders met to map out a winning wartime strategy, the most remarkable Christmas of the century played out across the globe. Pearl Harbor Christmas is a deeply moving and inspiring story about what it was like to live through a holiday season few would ever forget.

Preeminent historian Stanley Weintraub reveals the story behind one of the most remarkable holiday seasons in American history- December 1941- when the country, bracing itself for war, turned to the White House for inspiration and leadership as Roosevelt and Churchill met to forged one of history's greatest alliances.

Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock- in some cases overseas, elation- was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody's mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen in grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where they jointly lit the White House Christmas tree. As the two Allied leaders met to map out a winning wartime strategy, the most remarkable Christmas of the century played out across the globe. Pearl Harbor Christmas is a deeply moving and inspiring story about what it was like to live through a holiday season few would ever forget.

Biographical Notes

Stanley Weintraub is an award-winning author and co-author of more than fifty highly acclaimed books, including Silent Night and 11 Days in December. He lives in Delaware.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780306821530
  • Publication date: 13 Nov 2012
  • Page count: 224
  • Imprint: Da Capo Press
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