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‘A historical thriller, but one written with tongue firmly in cheek . . . Tyler is a witty writer, and this third outing for Grey is great fun’ Sunday Times

1665, and the Great Plague has London in its grip.

Everyone who can has fled and the only sounds are the tolling bells and the incessant cry of ‘bring out your dead!’. Where better, then, to hide a murdered man than amongst the corpses on their way to the plague pit?

John Grey, now a successful lawyer, is called in by Secretary of State Lord Arlington to investigate an unexpected admission to the Tothill pit. The man was, before his murder, known to be carrying a letter from the Duke of York to the French ambassador. But the letter has vanished and Arlington wants it.

Grey soon begins to realise why Arlington is prepared to pay well for the document. The contents will compromise not only the duke but many others around him. But Arlington is not the only one trying to recover the letter. Somebody has killed once to try to obtain it – and is prepared to kill again. And Samuel Pepys’s offer of help may not be all it seems.

So John Grey is forced to set off on a journey through plague-ravaged England to fulfil his commission and keep himself safe from his enemies – if the Plague doesn’t get him first.

The third gripping and atmospheric John Grey mystery, set in 17th century London.

Praise for L. C. Tyler

‘A dizzying whirl of plot and counterplot’ Guardian

‘Tyler juggles his characters, story wit and clever one liners with perfect balance’ The Times

‘I was seduced from John Grey’s first scene’ Ann Cleeves

‘Tyler at his entertaining best . . . a Restoration romp delivered with aplomb and verbal artistry, a delicious slice of history in all its dark, dank and deadly reality, and a veritable stage show of witty one-liners wrapped up in an enthralling mystery adventure’ Lancashire Evening Post

‘A cracking pace, lively dialogue, wickedly witty one-liners salted with sophistication . . . Why would we not want more of John Grey?’ The Bookbag

Reviews

Tyler juggles his characters, story wit and clever one liners with perfect balance
The Times
A cracking pace, lively dialogue, wickedly witty one-liners salted with sophistication . . . Why would we not want more of John Grey?
The Bookbag
An exciting, well-plotted and brilliantly witty historical mystery
For Winter Nights
Cracking!
Evening Telegraph
L.C. Tyler [sets] sharply observed period detail against a witty, vividly characterised version of life in the 17th century
Independent
Stirring stuff, with lively repartee, from a master of the genre
Irish Independent
Tyler is a witty writer, and this third outing for Grey is great fun
Sunday Times

A John Grey Historical Mystery