We have updated our Privacy Policy Please take a moment to review it. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the terms of our updated Privacy Policy.

Infantilised: How Our Culture Killed Adulthood

Hardcover / ISBN-13: 9781408720592

Price: £25

ON SALE: 27th June 2024

Genre: Society & Social Sciences / Sociology & Anthropology

Disclosure: If you buy products using the retailer buttons above, we may earn a commission from the retailers you visit.

A SHREWD AND TIMELY EXPLORATION OF A CULTURAL LANDSCAPE PREDICATED ON THE PRIMACY OF YOUTH

Have you ever noticed that in areas of everyday life, rather than being addressed like a mature adult, you’re increasingly treated like an irresponsible child in constant need of instruction and protection?

Noticing society’s creeping descent into infantilisation is one thing, however understanding the roots and causes of the phenomenon is not quite so easy. But in this topical and vitally important new work, cultural theorist and academic, Dr Keith Hayward, exposes the deep social, psychological and political dangers of a world characterised by denuded adult autonomy.

But importantly Infantilised is no one-dimensional, unsympathetic critique. Brimming with anecdotes and examples that span everything from the normalisation of infantilism on reality TV to the rise of a new class of political ‘infantocrat’, this comprehensive book also offers an insightful and at times humorous account of infantilism’s seductive appeal, and details some suggestions for avoiding some of the pitfalls associated with our increasingly infantilised world.

Reviews

Keith Hayward's brilliant and timely enquiry into the Peter Pan-ish realms of deferred adulthood is simultaneously alarming, entertaining, fascinating and significant. Whatever names or letters of the alphabet they are assigned, recent generations seem more and more to embrace without embarrassment props, preferences and points of view that seem closer to the world of play than the world of work. Hayward's descriptions and analysis of this phenomenon are non-judgemental and shiningly insightful. Hugely recommended
Stephen Fry