We have updated our Privacy Policy Please take a moment to review it. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the terms of our updated Privacy Policy.

It's Not A Bloody Trend

Paperback / ISBN-13: 9781472148704

Price: £14.99

Disclosure: If you buy products using the retailer buttons above, we may earn a commission from the retailers you visit.

‘A sledgehammer of a book putting to bed all the cynicism and misinformation around a condition that affects so many hidden, brilliant people’ Professor Tanya Byron

‘Laugh out loud funny and deeply validating – every person who thinks ADHD isn’t real should read this book’ Leanne Maskell, author of ADHD: An A to Z

Nobody should spend their life feeling defective. Everyone deserves to have a user manual to their brain – welcome to yours.

Once associated more with hyper boys than adults, ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is now recognised as a condition in need of a rebrand which affects people of all genders and ages in a multitude of ways.

In this enlightening and definitive layman’s guide, Kat Brown cheerfully smashes the stereotypes with scientific evidence, historical context, and practical support for ADHD minds across areas that can cause problems, from finances and work to self-medicating, relationships, hormones and self-esteem.

Based on Kat’s personal experience and extensive interviews with ADHDers and world-leading clinical experts, It’s Not A Bloody Trend is for anyone wondering if what’s always been ‘wrong’ with them might just be undiagnosed ADHD.

What's Inside

Read More Read Less

Reviews

I read to either lose myself in a different world or because I'm interested in learning about how other people's brains work, BUT I have NEVER read a book where every chapter feels like someone has sat in your own brain for your entire life and has now written your biography. It's a mixture of being shaken up and delighted at being so seen, and understanding how so many of the weird issues I've had my whole life were because of ADHD... What an exceptional book
Stacey Heale, author of 'Now is Not the Time for Flowers'
Here's a book I'm never gonna read cos I can't focus long enough to read a book but have bought to show support and will then wait to listen to on audio (whilst going for a walk cos I can only do two things at once)
Georgia Tennant, actress and producer
Some amazing points within the book whilst also providing a great perspective on the importance of how ADHD is not a trend. Excellently coupled with professional and clinical points of view. It's an amazing insight on ADHD, particularly from an older generation
Jess Chandler (@thejesschandler), neurodiversity activist
Almost as difficult as dealing with ADHD is coping with the weight of other people's opinions about it. This book serves as vindication for all those who've encountered eye-rolls from friends and family, and quashes much of the guilt, doubt and self-loathing that can accompany your navigation of a diagnosis or lengthy quest for one. Thoroughly researched and fantastically engaging; I didn't even have to go back and re-read huge chunks I'd glossed over while thinking about my shopping list
Laura Schofield, founder of Otto + Ivy
Finally, the ADHD book we've been waiting for. Funny, compassionate and deeply useful. Kat Brown's wisdom and personal experience makes for a must-read
Rebecca Schiller, author of 'Earthed'
Whether you've been diagnosed with ADHD, are waiting to be assessed or simply want to know more about a condition that was ignored in women for years, It's Not A Bloody Trend is going to change your outlook for good. Writer Kat Brown felt like there was something "deeply wrong" with her for decades... until she was diagnosed with ADHD at age 37. Read her brilliant story about living - and thriving - with the condition. It's like a salve for complicated brains
Stylist
Deeply researched, digestible and relatable. This is a book which not only assists and validates those starting their diagnosis journey, or already on its path, but also gives insight and experiential examples for those loved ones surrounding us to learn and understand with us. Brown speaks vulnerably of her own story whilst revealing a unique angle: a compilation of real life examples from different people interlacing her own experiences in an approachable and nurturing tone. ADHD manifests in many different ways and whilst a multiple choice box helps with initial diagnosis, this book shows a deep dive into the diversity of our real life experiences and how they are all illustrations of the obstacles we deal with daily. As the title suggests, there are some preconceptions about ADHD, and I myself have been fearful of talking about my diagnosis in public too much in fear of accusations of jumping on the band wagon. Brown writes that "rather than something being fashionable, it's usually social change that has led to it being more clearly seen" which sums this up perfectly
Emma Young, author of 'The Cheese Wheel'
Laugh out loud funny and deeply validating - every person who thinks ADHD isn't real should read this book. Unputdownable
Leanne Maskell, author of 'ADHD: An A to Z'
Offers support across areas that often cause problems, including self-medicating, finances, work, relationships and self-esteem. It is fascinating stuff with useful insights
The Sun
Shout out to Kat Brown on her excellent book It's Not A Bloody Trend, all about adult ADHD. I burned through the audiobook in two days. Cried four times. Downloaded three recommended apps. Bought some Loops and now saving up for a decluttering service. Thanks Kat
Simon Neville, award-winning former journalist
You can't influence the past but you can influence the future − and, drawing on lived experience, this book might just show you how
Professor Susan Young, president of the UK ADHD Partnership, co-founder in 1994 of the UK's first adult ADHD clinic, and co-author of the 2008 NICE guidelines on adult ADHD
A sledgehammer of a book putting to bed all the cynicism and misinformation around a condition that affects so many hidden, brilliant people. Read it if you live, or think you might live, with ADHD. Definitely read it if your lack of understanding leads you to believe it's just a bloody trend. It bloody well isn't. Only a neurodivergent person living with ADHD could write such a brilliantly informative yet easy to read book about ADHD. Kat Brown adeptly deconstructs the prevailing cynicism about a condition that could be so easily diagnosed and treated. If this book doesn't challenge the discrimination that so many neurodivergent people live with, I don't know what will
Professor Tanya Byron