Related to: 'Vanishing Frontiers'

PublicAffairs

Not for the Faint of Heart

Wendy R. Sherman
Authors:
Wendy R. Sherman

The art of diplomacy requires courage, persistence, and above all, authenticity. In Not for the Faint of Heart, Ambassador Wendy Sherman argues that we can all learn to put these qualities to work in our lives. In this book, Sherman shares stories of her time in the State Department negotiating the most sensitive issues of our time (often as the lone woman in the room), along with personal stories that show how our private experiences affect our professional lives. She argues that we negotiate best when we are our authentic selves, not reliant on stratagems or manipulation but on all of the skills we've gained through our experiences.Not for the Faint of Heart brings readers inside the world of international diplomacy and into the mind of one of our most effective diplomatic negotiators, revealing that success takes courage, the ability to forge common ground, and an understanding of the nature and use of power.

PublicAffairs

Reckless

Robert K. Brigham
Authors:
Robert K. Brigham
Little, Brown Young Readers US

Gunslinger Girl

Lyndsay Ely
Authors:
Lyndsay Ely
Basic Books

War in 140 Characters

David Patrikarakos
Authors:
David Patrikarakos

A leading foreign correspondent looks at how social media has transformed the modern battlefield, and how wars are foughtModern warfare is a war of narratives, where bullets are fired both physically and virtually. Whether you are a president or a terrorist, if you don't understand how to deploy the power of social media effectively you may win the odd battle but you will lose a twenty-first century war. Here, journalist David Patrikarakos draws on unprecedented access to key players to provide a new narrative for modern warfare. He travels thousands of miles across continents to meet a de-radicalized female member of ISIS recruited via Skype, a liberal Russian in Siberia who takes a job manufacturing "Ukrainian" news, and many others to explore the way social media has transformed the way we fight, win, and consume wars-and what this means for the world going forward.

PublicAffairs

The Storm Before the Storm

Mike Duncan
Authors:
Mike Duncan

The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. After its founding in 509 BCE, Rome grew from an unremarkable Italian city-state to the dominant superpower of the Mediterranean world. Through it all, the Romans never allowed a single man to seize control of the state. Every year for four hundred years the annually elected consuls voluntarily handed power to their successors. Not once did a consul give in to the temptation to grab absolute power and refuse to let it go. It was a run of political self-denial unmatched in the history of the world. The disciplined Roman republicans then proceeded to explode out of Italy and conquer a world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings.But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome ruled. Bankrolled by mountains of imperial wealth and without a foreign enemy to keep them united, ambitious Roman leaders began to stray from the republican austerity of their ancestors. Almost as soon as they had conquered the Mediterranean, Rome would become engulfed in violent political conflicts and civil wars that would destroy the Republic less than a century later.The Storm Before the Storm tells the story of the beginning of the end of the Roman Republic--the story of the first generation that had to cope with the dangerous new political environment made possible by Rome's unrivaled domination over the known world. The tumultuous years from 133-80 BCE set the stage for the fall of the Republic.The Republic faced issues like rising economic inequality, increasing political polarization, the privatization of the military, endemic social and ethnic prejudice, rampant corruption, ongoing military quagmires, and the ruthless ambition and unwillingness of elites to do anything to reform the system in time to save it--a situation that draws many parallels to present-day America. These issues are among the reasons why the Roman Republic would fall. And as we all know, those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

Andrew Sean Greer

Andrew Sean Greer is the bestselling author of five works of fiction, including The Confessions of Max Tivoli, which was named a best book of 2004 by the San Francisco Chronicle and the Chicago Tribune. He is the recipient of the Northern California Book Award, the California Book Award, the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, the O Henry award for short fiction and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Public Library. Greer lives in San Francisco. He has traveled to all of the locations in this novel, but he is only big in Italy.

Bernard E. Harcourt

Bernard E. Harcourt is the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. The author of several books, including The Illusion of Free Markets and Exposed, he lives in New York City.http://www.bernardharcourt.com

Dambisa Moyo

Dr Dambisa Moyo is an international economist who writes on the macroeconomy and global affairs.She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa, How The West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly - And the Stark Choices Ahead and Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What It Means for the World.Moyo was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, and was named to the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders Forum. Her work regularly appears in economic and finance-related publications such as the Financial Times and Wall Street Journal.She completed a doctorate in Economics at Oxford University and holds a Masters degree from Harvard University. She completed an undergraduate degree in Chemistry and an MBA in Finance at the American University in Washington DC.

David Patrikarakos

David Patrikarakos is the author of Nuclear Iran: the Birth of an Atomic State, a contributing editor at the Daily Beast, and a contributing writer at Politico. He has written for the New York Times, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, and many other publications. He lives in London.

Donna Brazile

Donna Brazile has been a political operative since the age of nine, when she worked to elect a City Council candidate in her home town of New Orleans who had promised to build a playground in her neighborhood. The candidate won, the swing set was installed, and a lifelong passion for political progress was ignited. Since then, Ms. Brazile worked on every presidential campaign from 1976 through 2000, culminating as Al Gore's campaign manager and becoming the first African-American ever to manage a presidential race. Apart from campaign work, she has been active at the highest levels of Democratic party leadership, previously serving as Vice Chair for Civic Engagement and Voter Participation at the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and chair of the DNC's Voting Rights Institute. Ms. Brazile has received frequent recognition for her work throughout her public life. In August 2009, O, The Oprah Magazine chose Ms. Brazile as one of its 20 "remarkable visionaries" for the magazine's first-ever O Power List. In addition, she was named among the 100 Most Powerful Women by Washingtonian magazine, Top 50 Women in America by Essence magazine, and received the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's highest award for political achievement.

Harlow Giles Unger

Acclaimed historian Harlow Giles Unger is a former Distinguished Visiting Fellow at George Washington's Mount Vernon. He is the author of twenty-four books, including eleven biographies of America's Founding Fathers and three histories of the early republic. He lives in New York City.

Lyndsay Ely

Lyndsay Ely is a writer and creative professional who currently calls Boston home. She is a geek, a foodie, and has never met an antique shop she didn't like. Gunslinger Girl is her debut novel.

Michael Savage

On air for 20 years, MICHAEL SAVAGE has millions of listeners for his #1 streaming radio show. The Savage Nation is one of the top radio talk programs in America, broadcast on over 225 stations. A prolific New York Times bestselling author, Dr. Savage has been profiled inPlayboy and The New Yorker and he has been awarded the Freedom of Speech Award from Talkers magazine. He received his Ph.D. in epidemiology and nutrition sciences from the University of California at Berkeley.

Michele J. Gelfand

Michele Gelfand is a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her pioneering research into cultural norms, conducted in over fifty countries, has been cited more than 22,000 times in the media, including in The Washington Post and Scientific American, and on NPR. The recipient of numerous awards, she is a past president of the International Association for Conflict Management.

Mike Duncan

Mike Duncan is one of the foremost history podcasters in the world. His award winning series The History of Rome chronologically narrated the entire history of the Roman Empire over 189 weekly episodes. Running from 2007-2012, The History of Rome has generated more than 56 million downloads and remains one of the most popular history podcasts on the internet.

Peter Moskowitz

Peter Moskowitz is a freelance journalist who has written for the Guardian, New York Times, New Republic, Wired, Slate, Buzzfeed, and many others. A former staff writer at Al Jazeera America, he is a graduate of Hampshire College and the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. Moskowitz lives in New York City.

Quentin Letts

Quentin Letts is parliamentary sketch writer and theatre critic for the Daily Mail. A regular broadcaster on radio and television, he was formerly New York correspondent for The Times and gossip columnist for the Daily Telegraph. He recently presented Radio 4's series 'What's The Point Of?' He lists his recreations, in Who's Who as 'gossip' and 'character defenestration'.

Richard Woodman

Richard Woodman was born in London in 1944. He became an indentured midshipman in cargo liners at 16 and has sailed in a variety of ships, serving from apprentice to captain. He remains a professional sailor and in 1978 won the Marine Society's Harmer Award.Richard Woodman served an apprenticeship in cargo-liners, qualified as a navigator and spent another eleven years at sea as a commander. His passion for the sea is reflected in his prolific output, which includes works of both fiction (the Nathaniel Drinkwater series) and non-fiction (recently, The Sea Warriors, published by Constable).Richard Woodman spent over 30 years at sea. His prolific output includes fiction (Nathaniel Drinkwater series) and non-fiction (recently, The Sea Warriors).Richard Woodman is best known for his Nathaniel Drinkwater series of historical naval novels. Born in London in 1944 Richard joined his first ship at the age of 16 and spent over 30 years at sea. Married with two adult children, he lives in Harwich.

Suzy Hansen

Suzy Hansen is contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine and has written for many other publications. In 2007, she was awarded a fellowship from the Institute of Current World Affairs to do research in Turkey. She currently lives in Istanbul. Notes on a Foreign Country is her first book.

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of dozens of books and the recipient of various awards, including the National Humanities Medal, Presented by the President of the United States in 2003.