Related to: 'Two O'Clock Boy'

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It Was Her

Mark Hill
Authors:
Mark Hill

Do you want a thriller where nothing is as it seems?Twenty years ago Tatia was adopted into a well-off home, where she seemed happy, settled. Then the youngest boy in the family dies in an accident, and she gets the blame. Did she do it?Tatia was cast out, away from her remaining adopted siblings Joel and Sarah. Now she yearns for a home to call her own. So when she see families going on holiday, leaving their beautiful homes empty, there seems no harm in living their lives while she is gone. But somehow, people keep ending up dead.Did she kill them?As bodies start to appear in supposedly safe neighbourhoods, DI Ray Drake and DS Flick Crowley race to find the thinnest of links between the victims. But Drake's secret past is once more threatening to destroy everything.Will they catch her?PRAISE FOR MARK HILL'A fantastic debut: dark, addictive and original. I couldn't put it down'Robert Bryndza, author of The Girl in the Ice'Grips from the start and never lets up' The Times 'Wreaks havoc with your assumptions. Hill has a hell of a career ahead of him' Alex Marwood, author of The Wicked Girls and The Darkest Secret 'A cracking debut. I can't wait to see more of Ray Drake' Mark Billingham, #1 bestselling author of Love Like Blood and In The Dark 'Utterly gripping, packed with unforgettable characters - and SO well-written. The twists had me reeling!' Louise Voss

Sphere

His First Lie

Mark Hill
Authors:
Mark Hill

'A fantastic debut: dark, addictive and original. I couldn't put it down' Robert Bryndza, author of The Girl in the Ice Do you want a thriller that grips from the first line?Do you want a thriller to leave you gasping for air?Connor Laird frightens people: he's intense, he's fearless, and he seems to be willing to do anything to protect himself and those he loves. He arrives in the Longacre Children's Home seemingly from nowhere, and instantly becomes hero and villain to every other child there. Thirty years later, someone is killing all of those who grew up in the Longacre, one by one. Each of them has secrets, not least investigating cop DI Ray Drake.One by one the mysteries of the past are revealed as Drake finds himself in a race against time before the killer gets to him.Who is killing to hide their secret?And can YOU guess the ending? 'Grips from the start and never lets up' The Times 'Wreaks havoc with your assumptions. Hill has a hell of a career ahead of him' Alex Marwood, author of The Wicked Girls and The Darkest Secret 'A cracking debut. I can't wait to see more of Ray Drake.' Mark Billingham, #1 bestselling author of Love Like Blood and In The Dark 'Utterly gripping, packed with unforgettable characters - and SO well-written. The twists had me reeling!' Louise Voss

Alan Hunter

Alan Hunter was born in Hoveton, Norfolk in 1922. He left school at the age of 14 to work on his father's farm, spending his spare time sailing on the Norfolk Broads and writing nature notes for the Eastern Evening News. He also wrote poetry, some of which was published while he was in the RAF during World War II. By 1950, he was running his own book shop in Norwich and in 1956, he wrote the first of 45 George Gently novels. He died in 2005 aged 82.

Alex Gray

Alex Gray was born and educated in Glasgow. After studying English and Philosophy at the University of Strathclyde, she worked as a visiting officer for the DHSS, a time she looks upon as postgraduate education since it proved a rich source of character studies. She then trained as a secondary school teacher of English. Alex began writing professionally in 1993 and had immediate success with short stories, articles and commissions for BBC radio programmes. She has been awarded the Scottish Association of Writers' Constable and Pitlochry trophies for her crime writing. A regular on the Scottish bestseller lists, her previous novels include Five Ways to Kill a Man, Glasgow Kiss, Pitch Black, The Riverman, Never Somewhere Else, The Swedish Girl and Keep the Midnight Out. She is the co-founder of the international Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, which had its inaugural year in 2012.

Alex Kava

Alex Kava is the New York Times bestselling author of the critically acclaimed series featuring former Marine Ryder Creed and his K9 dogs, and the international bestselling Maggie O'Dell series. Published in thirty-two countries with over six million copies sold, Kava's novels have been on a multitude of international bestseller lists. She is a member of the Nebraska Writers Guild and International Thriller Writers. Kava and her pack of Westies divide their time between Omaha, Nebraska and Pensacola, Florida.

Andrea Carter

Andrea Carter graduated in Law from Trinity College, Dublin. She qualified as a solicitor and moved to the Inishowen peninsula where she lived and worked for a number of years. In 2005 she transferred to the Bar and moved to Dublin to practise as a barrister. She grew up in Ballyfin, Co Laois. Death at Whitewater Church is her first novel.

Anne Randall

Anne Randall was born in Glasgow and after university taught English in various secondary schools in inner Glasgow. In 2011 she won first prize for crime fiction writing at the Wells Literature Festival. Anne now lives in Glastonbury with her husband, two cats and one dog. Anne's first book in the Wheeler and Ross series, Riven, was written under the name A. J. McCreanor.

Cath Staincliffe

Cath Staincliffe is an award winning novelist, radio playwright and creator of ITV's hit series Blue Murder. Cath's books have been shortlisted for the CWA Best First Novel award. She was joint winner of the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2012. Letters To My Daughter's Killer was selected for the Specsavers Crime Thriller Book Club on ITV3 in 2014. Cath also writes the Scott & Bailey books based on the popular ITV series. She lives with her family in Manchester.

Christobel Kent

Christobel Kent was born in London and educated at Cambridge. She has lived variously in Essex, London and Italy. Her childhood included several years spent on a Thames sailing barge in Maldon, Essex with her father, stepmother, three siblings and four step-siblings. She now lives in both Cambridge and Florence with her husband and five children.

Clare Mackintosh

Clare Mackintosh spent twelve years in the police force, including time on CID, and as a public order commander. She left the police in 2011 to work as a freelance journalist and social media consultant and is the founder of the Chipping Norton Literary Festival. She now writes full time and lives in North Wales with her husband and their three children.Clare's debut novel, I Let You Go, was a Sunday Times bestseller and the fastest-selling title by a new crime writer in 2015, selling over one million copies worldwide. It won the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year in 2016 and was selected for ITV's Loose Women's Loose Books. Clare's second novel, I See You was a number one Sunday Times bestseller. I Let You Go and I See You were both selected for the Richard & Judy Book club and have sold in over 60 international territories combined. Let Me Lie is Clare's third novel.Clare is the patron of the Silver Star Society, an Oxford-based charity which supports the work carried out in the John Radcliffe Hospital's Silver Star unit, providing special care for mothers with medical complications during pregnancy.For more information visit Clare's website www.claremackintosh.com or find her at www.facebook.com/ClareMackWrites or on Twitter @ClareMackint0sh #ILetYouGo #ISeeYou #LetMeLie

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles is the author of the hugely popular Morland Dynasty novels, which have captivated and enthralled readers for decades. She is also the author of the contemporary Bill Slider Mystery series, as well as her new series, War at Home, which is an epic family drama set against the backdrop of World War I. Cynthia's passions are music, wine, horses, architecture and the English countryside.

Duncan Falconer

A former member of the elite Special Boat Service & 14 Int., N. Ireland's top-secret SAS detachment, he left after more than a decade of operational service & went into the private security 'circuit'. His SBS exploits were documented in his 1st book, the bestselling First Into Action.

Elizabeth Chadwick

Much of Elizabeth Chadwick's research is carried out as a member of Regia Anglorum, an early mediaeval re-enactment society with emphasis on accurately re-creating the past. She also tutors in the skill of writing historial and romantic fiction. She won a Betty Trask Award for The Wild Hunt and has been shortlisted for the RNA Awards four times.

Elizabeth Peters

Elizabeth Peters is a pen name of Barbara Mertz, who earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Over the course of her fifty-year career she wrote more than seventy mystery and suspense novels, and three nonfiction books on Egypt. She was the recipient of numerous writing awards, including grandmaster and lifetime achievement awards from the Mystery Writers of America, Malice Domestic, and Bouchercon. In 2012 she was given the first Amelia Peabody Award, created in her honor, at the Malice Domestic convention. She died in 2013, leaving a partially completed manuscript of The Painted Queen.

Frances Fyfield

Frances Fyfield has spent much of her professional life practising as a criminal lawyer, work which has informed her highly acclaimed crime novels. She has been the recipient of both the Gold and Silver Crime Writers' Association Daggers. She is also a regular broadcaster on Radio 4, most recently as the presenter of the series 'Tales from the Stave'. She lives in London and in Deal, overlooking the sea which is her passion.

Gilly Macmillan

Gilly Macmillan is the New York Times bestselling author of What She Knew and The Perfect Girl. She trained as an art historian and worked at The Burlington Magazine and the Hayward Gallery before starting a family. Since then she's worked as a lecturer in photography, and now writes full-time. She resides in Bristol, England.

Gregg Olsen

New York Times bestselling author Gregg Olsen has written eight non-fiction books, six novels and has contributed a short story to a collection edited by Lee Child. The award-winning author has been a guest on US and international television shows discussing crime.

Karen Dionne

Karen Dionne drew heavily on her experiences during the 1970s in Michigan's Upper Peninsula to write The Marsh King's Daughter, when she and her husband lived in a tent with their six-week-old daughter while they built a tiny cabin. Karen carried water from a stream, made wild apple jelly over a campfire (and defended it against marauding raccoons), sampled wild foods such as cattail heads and milkweed pods, and washed nappies in a bucket (which Karen says is every bit as nasty as it sounds). She enjoys nature photography and lives with her husband in Detroit's northern suburbs.

Kim Lock

Kim Lock was born in Mount Gambier in the 1980s. After living and working in Darwin, Melbourne and Canberra, Kim returned to home soil in South Australia, where she lives in the Barossa Valley with her partner and children.Her writing has also appeared in, amongst others, Daily Life, The Guardian, The Sydney Morning Herald online, and Essential Baby.

Laura Marshall

Friend Request is Laura Marshall's first novel, and is an ebook number one bestseller. It was also shortlisted for the Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize 2016, and was runner-up in the Bath Novel Award 2016. Laura lives with her family in Kent.