E. Arnot Robertson - Cullum - Little, Brown Book Group

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Cullum

By E. Arnot Robertson

  • Paperback
  • £10.00

First published in 1928, Cullum is available in as a Virago Modern Classic

'The old sorrow and desire tore at me again as fiercely as they had ever done...this man's body had been my heaven, and I loved him.'

Esther Sieveking is nineteen, half French, half fox-hunting English. She lives in Surrey among people for whom books are a last resource for killing time, but for her literature holds the world; writing is her aspiration. Then she meets the young author Cullum Hayes, brilliant, plausible, glamorous. He tells her they have met in his dreams. She believes him, and falls in love. But Cullum is a romancer, a cheat, a weaver of stories and a seducer of women...

On publication in 1928, many exclaimed over Cullum's extraordinary maturity, depth and sexual candour. For some, though, this story of first, obsessive and hopeless love, by a twenty-four-year-old author, was too much - as one reviewer remarked, 'It is all very well to be outspoken, but there are some things which are better left unsaid and Cullum is full of them.

Biographical Notes

E. Arnot Robertson (1903-1961) wrote eight novels, of which Cullum was the first, launching her as one of the most popular English novelists of the 1930s and 40s.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844081981
  • Publication date: 26 Nov 2004
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Virago
Virago

Four Frightened People

E. Arnot Robertson
Authors:
E. Arnot Robertson

Matter of fact Judy Corder, a 26 year old doctor, is travelling with her cousin Stewart on a slow ship to Singapore. Incarcerated with their fellow passengers, at 107 degrees in the shade, they fall in with the hearty Mrs Mardick and Arnold Ainger, and intriguing, somewhat pompous married man. Then plague breaks out. Under cover of darkness, all four flee the ship for the terrors of the jungle. In the depths of the jungle, civilisation abandoned, the true natures of all four assert themselves . . .

Virago

Ordinary Families

E. Arnot Robertson
Authors:
E. Arnot Robertson

'I was running on happily because it was so good to be able to watch him under cover of my own talk, knowing exactly now what I wanted of him - mind, body, everything' Lallie is one of four children of the eccentric, quintessentially English Rush family. Boating, bird watching and inter-family rivalry are the focus of life in their village - Pin Mill, on the Suffolk marshes. Brought up on fair play and the 'family sense of humour' the Rush children soon learn to fend for themselves - on water and on dry land. We watch as Lallie grows to adulthood; loving and hating her 'ordinary' family, carving a space for herself in the shadow of her beautiful sister Margaret, who claims the lion's share of everything. But Lallie is special too, clear, clear-sighted, sexually aware. Just as well, for to keep the man she loves she faces the biggest family fight of all...

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Cath Staincliffe is an award winning novelist, radio playwright and creator of ITV's hit series Blue Murder. Cath's books have been shortlisted for the CWA Best First Novel award. She was joint winner of the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2012. Letters To My Daughter's Killer was selected for the Specsavers Crime Thriller Book Club on ITV3 in 2014. Cath also writes the Scott & Bailey books based on the popular ITV series. She lives with her family in Manchester.

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