Charles R. Morris - A Rabble of Dead Money - Little, Brown Book Group

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A Rabble of Dead Money

The Great Crash and the Global Depression: 1929 - 1939

By Charles R. Morris

  • Hardback
  • £P.O.R.

The causes and consequences of the Crash of 1929 and the years of financial catastrophe that followed are a social and economic drama of global proportions, here brilliantly reconceived by Charles Morris, a former banker and veteran financial soothsayer described as "our leading narrative historian of economic success and scandals."

The Great Crash of 1929 violently disrupted the United States' confident march toward becoming the world's superpower. The suddenness of the cataclysm and the long duration of the collapse scarred generations of Americans. A Rabble of Dead Money is a lucid and fast-paced account that pulls together the intricate threads of policy, ideology, international hatreds, and sheer cantankerousness that finally pushed the world economy over the brink.

Award-winning writer Charles R. Morris anchors his narrative in America while fully sketching the poisonous political atmosphere of postwar Europe. 1920s America was the embodiment of the modern age-cars, electricity, credit, radio, movies. Breakneck growth presaged a serious recession by the decade's end, but not a depression. It took heroic financial mismanagement, a glut-induced global collapse in agricultural prices, and a self-inflicted crash in world trade to produce the Great Depression.

Vividly told and deeply researched, A Rabble of Dead Money anatomizes history's greatest economic catastrophe-and draws its lessons for the present.

Biographical Notes

Charles R. Morris has written fifteen books, including The Coming Global Boom, a New York Times Notable Book; The Tycoons, a Barron's Best Book of 2005; and The Trillion Dollar Meltdown, winner of the Gerald Loeb Award and a New York Times bestseller. His recent book, The Dawn of Innovation, was named a Wall Street Journal Best Business Book of 2012. A lawyer and former banker, Morris's articles and reviews have appeared in many publications, including the Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781610395342
  • Publication date: 27 Apr 2017
  • Page count: 416
  • Imprint: PublicAffairs
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