Eric R. Kandel - The Disordered Mind - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472140876
    • Publication date:27 Sep 2018

The Disordered Mind

What Unusual Brains Tell Us About Ourselves

By Eric R. Kandel

  • Hardback
  • £20.00

The Disordered Mind is the definitive statement on all we know about the brain and its associated disorders by the eminent Nobel Prize-winning scientist and professor Eric R. Kandel.

'[Kandel's discoveries] have truly changed our understanding of brain function' - Citation for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

'[Eric Kandel is] one of the preeminent neuroscientists in the world' - Sue Halpern, The New York Review of Books

Neurological and psychiatric disorders have long been regarded as fundamentally different, depending on whether they appear to affect the brain or the mind. In reality, the brain and the mind are inseparable. Both types of disorder can affect every aspect of brain function: from perception, action, memory and emotion to empathy, social interaction, attention and consciousness.

It is easy to view brain disorders as simply tragic or frightening. However, studying where these functions go wrong provides a window on the workings of the healthy brain, and makes it more likely that scientists and clinicians will be able to develop effective treatments or preventative strategies. As individuals, and as a society, we are also able to better empathise with people with disorders of the mind.

Building on his pioneering research, Eric R. Kandel illustrates how breakthrough studies of brain disruptions can deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behaviour, memory and creativity, and perhaps in the future will transform medical care and lead to the development of a unified theory of mind.

Biographical Notes

Eric R. Kandel, M.D., is University Professor at Columbia; Kavli Professor and Director, Kavli Institute for Brain Science; Co-Director, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behaviour Institute; and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is an editor of Principles of Neural Science, the standard textbook in the field. His book The Age of Insight won the Kreisky Award in Literature, Austria's highest literary award. Kandel has received 23 honorary degrees, is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences as well as a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London. He has been recognized with the Albert Lasker Award, the National Medal of Science, and the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2000.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781472141392
  • Publication date: 27 Sep 2018
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Robinson
[Kandel's discoveries] have truly changed our understanding of brain function — Citation for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
[Eric Kandel is] one of the preeminent neuroscientists in the world — Sue Halpern, New York Review of Books
Bold propositions such as Kandel's in The Disordered Mind blur the distinction between therapies involving medication or surgery and those that use behavioural and cognitive means. Still, one should appreciate Kandel's humanistic aims: knowing more about disorders makes us less likely to stigmatize those who think or act differently — Douwe Draaisma, Nature
Robinson

Talking to Robots

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Authors:
David Ewing Duncan

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Robinson

Universal Play

Alexander Kriss
Authors:
Alexander Kriss

Even as the popularity of videogames has skyrocketed, a dark cloud continues to hang over them. Many people who play games feel embarrassed to admit as much, and many who don't worry about the long-term effects of a medium often portrayed as dangerous and corruptive.Drawing on years of experience working directly with people who play games, clinical psychologist Alexander Kriss steers the discourse away from extreme and factually inaccurate claims around the role of games in addiction, violence and mental illness, instead focusing on the importance of understanding the unique relationship that forms between a game and its player. Through vivid psychotherapy case illustrations, autobiographical memoir, and a wide range of psychological theory and research, Universal Play lays out an honest and humanistic vision of games, their potentials and risks, and how they can teach us more about who we are and who we could be.

Hachette Audio

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Jamil Zaki
Authors:
Jamil Zaki

Empathy has been on people's mind a lot lately. Philosophers, evolutionary scientists and indeed former President Obama agree that an increase in empathy could advance us beyond the hatred, violence and polarization in which the world seems caught. Others disagree, arguing it is easiest to empathize with people who look, talk or think like us. As a result, empathy can inspire nepotism, racism and worse. Having studied the neuroscience and psychology of empathy for over a decade, Jamil Zaki thinks both sides of this debate have a point. Empathy is sometimes an engine for moral progress, and other times for moral failure. But Zaki also thinks that both sides are wrong about how empathy works. Both scientists and non-scientists commonly argue that empathy is something that happens to you, sort of like an emotional knee-jerk reflex. Second, they believe it happens more to some people than others. This lines people up along a spectrum, with deep empaths on one end and psychopaths on the other. What's more, wherever we are on that spectrum, we're stuck there. In The War for Kindness, Zaki lays out a very different view of how empathy works, one that breaks these two assumptions. Empathy is not a reflex; it's a choice. We choose empathy (or apathy) constantly: when we read a tragic novel, or cross the street to avoid a homeless person, or ask a distraught friend what's the matter. This view has crucial consequences: if empathy is less a trait (like height), and more a skill (like being good at word games), then we can improve at it. By choosing it more often, we can flex our capabilities and grow more empathic over time. We can also "tune" empathy, ramping it up in situations where it will help and turning it down when it might backfire. Zaki takes us from the world of doctors who train medical students to empathise better to social workers who help each other survive empathising too much. From police trainers who help cadets avoid becoming violent cops to political advocates who ask white Americans to literally walk a (dusty) mile in Mexican immigrants' shoes. This book will give you a deepened understanding of how empathy works, how to control it and how to become the type of empathiser you want to be.

Little, Brown

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Authors:
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Robinson

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Hachette Audio

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Authors:
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Hachette Audio

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Authors:
Catherine Whitlock, Rhodri Evans

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Robinson

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Authors:
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Authors:
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Robinson

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Robinson

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Authors:
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Piatkus

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Hachette Books

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Authors:
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Piatkus

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Robinson

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Hachette Audio

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Abacus

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Authors:
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Corsair

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Authors:
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Black Dog & Leventhal

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Authors:
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New Harbinger

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Authors:
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