Bryan 'The Brush' Burnsides - Cut It Out - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472128188
    • Publication date:02 Nov 2017

Cut It Out

Dictators, Despots and Other Badass Hairdos

By Bryan 'The Brush' Burnsides

  • Hardback
  • £9.99

Cut It Out is a hilarious and irreverent spoof guide to the hairstyles of despots and dictators over the centuries that have determined how we view such despicable individuals.

What do all despots and dictators across the ages have in common? Homicidal tendencies? Ruthless megalomania? A desire to enslave millions? Of course! They're not working for Médecins Sans Frontières? . . . but that isn't the whole story. It's all been foretold in the hair, baby.

Combing through history, every badass from Genghis Khan to Donald Trump has clambered up the pole to ultimate power on the back of some of the most radical hairdos the world has seen. It's a proven scientific fact that the badder the dude, the bigger the rug statement and in Cut It Out we feature looks that will blow your stack and have you sprinting to the nearest salon to rock your locks.

Award-winning stylist Bryan 'The Brush' Burnsides brings decades of prime salon experience to his definitive study of nifty trims for nasty guys.

In Cut It Out Burnsides reveals just how the original 'dos were done and shares the intimate trade secrets of today's underground stylists, hell-bent on creating total retro-hair war. Dust off that Mao suit, slip on that armband and get ready for Big Bad Hair!

Cut It Out is a spoof guide to the hairstyles of despots and dictators over the centuries that have determined how we view such despicable individuals. Utilising the language of the salon and contemporary hair and beauty trade publications, the book critically examines the hairstyles that are the ultimate definition of 'bad' (and badder) and offers a 'how-to' guide for those brave enough to copy the 'dos of the dastardly, the demonic and downright devious. From Genghis Khan to Grigori Rasputin via Donald Trump and Putin (taking in a few Nazis en route) Cut It Out is both a valuable historic document and outré-cool style guide to the world's most counter-intuitive crops.

Biographical Notes

Bryan 'The Brush' Burnsides is a celebrity hairstylist and transitioning female-to-hipster and a former 'Miss Scissors' Scotland (1993, Expat Category). He is currently official Pony-Tail Consultant at Dancing Beaver Indian Reservation, South Dakota.

Cut It Out is ably co-authored and manicured by British writer Tom Henry who, among many other worthy publications is the author of The Turnip Prize - A Retrospective (Cassell, 2016) an academically comprehensive guide to the best of the world's worst art. At the age of fifty he has a surprisingly fulsome head of hair, most of which is his.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781472128195
  • Publication date: 02 Nov 2017
  • Page count: 64
  • Imprint: Constable
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