Marcia Barrett - Forward . . . - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472124432
    • Publication date:07 Jun 2018
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    • ISBN:9781472124425
    • Publication date:07 Jun 2018

Forward . . .

By Marcia Barrett

  • Hardback
  • £20.00

Marcia Barrett's memoir is much more than just a pop star autobiography - it is a charming, candid, laugh-out-loud story of survival, triumph, indomitable spirit and sheer force of will.

Coming to London aged thirteen from desperate poverty in Jamaica; pregnant at fifteen; fifteen years later singing in Boney M, one of the biggest international groups of the late-1970s; a messy group split during the 1980s; a 1990s solo career interrupted by six bouts of cancer - ovarian, breast, lymph node (twice), spine and oesophagus - and having to learn to walk again.

Yet throughout Marcia Barrett has remained totally cheerful, relentlessly optimistic and a shining inspiration, looking on every obstacle as a mere inconvenience rather than anything insurmountable. Now, she is ready to tell her fantastic story, which is much more than just a pop star autobiography. It is a charming, candid, laugh-out-loud story of survival, triumph, indomitable spirit and total upfullness, often driven by sheer force of will. It is a feelgood story which will resonate amongst all.

Biographical Notes

Marcia Barrett, now relocated to Berlin, is still making music and touring both as a solo artist and as Boney M.

Lloyd Bradley is one of the UK's leading experts on modern black music from Great Britain and Jamaica. He has written extensively on health and fitness and is an accomplished speaker, lecturer and broadcaster.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781472124418
  • Publication date: 07 Jun 2018
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Constable
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