Roxane Gay - Bad Feminist - Little, Brown Book Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • E-Book £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781472119742
    • Publication date:21 Aug 2014

Bad Feminist

By Roxane Gay

  • Paperback
  • £13.99

'I'm human, full of contradictions, and a feminist.' Bad Feminist is collection of frank, funny, whip-smart and spot-on essays from one of the most-watched young cultural observers of her generation, Roxane Gay (@rgay).

'Pink is my favourite colour. I used to say my favourite colour was black to be cool, but it is pink - all shades of pink. If I have an accessory, it is probably pink. I read Vogue, and I'm not doing it ironically, though it might seem that way. I once live-tweeted the September issue.'

In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of colour (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.

Bad Feminist is a sharp, funny and sincere look at the ways in which the culture we consume becomes who we are, and an inspiring call-to-arms of all the ways we still need to do better.

Biographical Notes

Roxane Gay is the author of An Untamed State, Bad Feminist and the story collection Ayiti. Her work has also appeared in Glamour, Best American Short Stories, and the New York Times Book Review. She is the co-editor of PANK.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781472119735
  • Publication date: 21 Aug 2014
  • Page count: 336
  • Imprint: Corsair
A strikingly fresh cultural critic. — Ron Charles, Washington Post
Roxane Gay is so great at weaving the intimate and personal with what is most bewildering and upsetting at this moment in culture. She is always looking, always thinking, always passionate, always careful, always right there. — Sheila Heti, author of How Should a Person Be?
Gay is my favorrite current writer. — Jessica Valenti, Guardian
Let this be the year of Roxane Gay. — Time Magazine
Roxane is a powerhouse of a writer. She's really punk in her approach and her book Bad Feminist has liberated a lot of women by making it clear you can be a conflicted, complicated woman and still identify with feminism. — Lena Dunham
Smart readers cannot afford to miss these essays, which range from socially significant art (Girls, Django in Chains) and feminist issues (abortion) to politics (Chris Brown) and why Gay likes pink. — Library Journal
As Bad Feminist proves, Gay is a necessary and brave voice when it comes to figuring out all the crazy mixed messages in our mixed-up world. — ‘20 New Nonfiction Books That Will Make You Smarter’, Flavorwire
I just read Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist in one plane ride. It's brilliant. I am deeply grateful for it. Please read this book. — Elizabeth Gilbert (author of Eat, Pray, Love) via Twitter
One of our sharpest new culture critics plants her flag in topics ranging from trigger warnings to Orange is the New Black in this timely collection of essays. — O, the Oprah Magazine
Refreshing . . . [Gay's] greatest gift as a writer is energy, enthusiasm - sheer gusto. She loves bad television, and enjoys terrible films, and is overjoyed by an unexpected triple word score. Her writing feels alive. You might not always agree with her, but you are always interested to know what she thinks. — Helen Lewis, New Statesman
Roxane Gay applies her discerning eye to everything from Paula Deen to The Batchelor. — Marie Claire
Gay's essays are consistently smart and provocative. — USA Today
Alternately friendly and provocative, wry and serious, her takes on everything from Girls to Fifty Shades of Grey help to recontextualize what feminism is--and what it can be. — Time Out (New York)
Gay's essays expertly weld her personal experiences with broader gender trends occurring politically and in popular culture. — Huffington Post
What makes Bad Feminist such a good read isn't only Gay's ability to deftly weave razor-sharp pop cultural analysis and criticism with a voice that is both intimate and relatable. It's that she's incapable of blindly accepting any kind of orthodoxy. — San Francisco Chronicle
Roxane Gay is the brilliant girl-next-door: your best friend and your sharpest critic . . . She is by turns provocative, chilling, hilarious; she is also required reading. — People
An assortment of comical, yet astute essays that touch on Gay's personal evolution as a woman, popular culture throughout the recent past, and the state of feminism today. — Harper's Bazaar
Fascinating . . . An important and pioneering contemporary writer . . . Readers will immediately understand the appeal of Gay's intimate and down-to-earth voice . . . An important contribution to the complicated terrain of gender politics. — Boston Globe
I know there are still four and a half months left, but I'm calling it now: 2014 is the year of Roxane Gay. I just devoured her book, Bad Feminist . . . Amazing. — Rookie
A thoughtful and often hilarious new collection of essays. — Chicago Tribune
If you read one book this month, let it be this gem by Roxane Gay . . . Tackling topics as varied as racial privilege, Chris Brown, feminism, Fifty Shades of Grey and Trayvon Martin in her typically spot-on and engaging style. This is a book all your girlfriends will want to borrow. — Pride
Virago

Nobody's Victim

Carrie Goldberg
Authors:
Carrie Goldberg

Seal Press

Colonize This!

Bushra Rehman, Daisy Hernández
Authors:
Bushra Rehman, Daisy Hernández

It has been decades since women of color first turned feminism upside down, exposing the feminist movement as exclusive, white, and unaware of the concerns and issues of women of color from around the globe. Since then, key social movements have risen, including Black Lives Matter, transgender rights, and the activism of young undocumented students. Social media has also changed how feminism reaches young women of color, generating connections in all corners of the country. And yet we remain a country divided by race and gender.Now, a new generation of outspoken women of color offer a much-needed fresh dimension to the shape of feminism of the future. In Colonize This!, Daisy Hernandez and Bushra Rehman have collected a diverse, lively group of emerging writers who speak to the strength of community and the influence of color, to borders and divisions, and to the critical issues that need to be addressed to finally reach an era of racial freedom. With prescient and intimate writing, Colonize This! will reach the hearts and minds of readers who care about the experience of being a woman of color, and about establishing a culture that fosters freedom and agency for women of all races.

Virago

Rebel Women

Rosalind Miles
Authors:
Rosalind Miles
Virago

Can We All Be Feminists?

June Eric-Udorie
Authors:
June Eric-Udorie

"The intersectional feminist anthology we all need to read" (Bustle), edited by a remarkable and inspiring twenty-year-old activist who the BBC named one of 100 "inspirational and influential women" of 2016.'Not just a key read but a mandatory one' Stylist September Top Ten BooksWhy is it difficult for so many women to fully identify with the word "feminist"? How do our personal histories and identities affect our relationship to feminism? Why is intersectionality so important? Can a feminist movement that doesn't take other identities like race, religion, or socioeconomic class into account even be considered feminism? How can we make feminism more inclusive?In Can We All Be Feminists?, seventeen established and emerging writers from diverse backgrounds wrestle with these questions, exploring what feminism means to them in the context of their other identities-from a hijab-wearing Muslim to a disability rights activist to a body-positive performance artist to a transgender journalist. Edited by the brilliant, galvanizing, and dazzlingly precocious nineteen-year-old feminist activist and writer June Eric-Udorie, this impassioned, thought-provoking collection showcases the marginalized women whose voices are so often drowned out and offers a vision for a new, comprehensive feminism that is truly for all.Including essays by: Soofiya Andry, Gabrielle Bellot, Caitlin Cruz, Nicole Dennis-Benn, Brit Bennett, Evette Dionne, Aisha Gani, Afua Hirsch, Juliet Jacques, Wei Ming Kam, Mariya Karimjee, Eishar Kaur, Emer O'Toole, Frances Ryan, Zoé Samudzi, Charlotte Shane, and Selina Thompson.'Amid debates about the direction of the modern feminist movement, Can We All Be Feminists?, edited by June Eric-Udorie, presents new writing from 17 women on finding the right way forward, taking into account the intersections between different forms of prejudice.' Laura Bates, Guardian

Hachette Audio

Be The Change

Gina Martin
Authors:
Gina Martin
Virago

The Wind in My Hair

Masih Alinejad
Authors:
Masih Alinejad

'A must-read for anyone who cares about women's equality' Sheryl Sandberg'A flame-thrower for the rights of women who live under the thumb of repression and injustice' Tina BrownBBC RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEKThis memoir is the extraordinary story of how one woman, Masih Alinejad, an awe-inspiring journalist and activist from a small village in Iran, overcame enormous adversity to fight for what she truly believed and founded a major movement for women around the world with the simple removal of her hijab.It all started with a single photo, a bold statement on Masih's Facebook page: a woman standing proudly, her face bare, her beautiful, curly hair blowing in the wind. Her crime: simply removing her veil, or hijab, which is compulsory for women in Iran. This is the photo that sparked a social-media liberation movement, 'My Stealthy Freedom'. Across Iran, women started posting pictures of their uncovered hair on Masih's page in open defiance of the strict religious beliefs of their country (and often, their families) while sharing their personal stories about this powerful mode of expression. With the creation of 'My Stealthy Freedom' Masih has gained over one million supporters around the world, and inspired Islamic women everywhere to take a stand for their basic human rights. She's been covered by the media from Vogue, to the Guardian, the New York Times and beyond. Last year she was the recipient of the Women's Rights Award from the Geneva Summit for Human Rights and Democracy. But behind the scenes of this movement, Masih has been fighting a painful personal battle. She is a divorcee -- a sin equivalent to prostitution in Iranian culture. As a reporter, Masih has been actively speaking out against the government's corrupt policies for more than a decade, and has faced abuse and slander at every turn. In 2009 she went abroad during the Iranian presidential election with hopes of interviewing Barack Obama. Before the interview could take place, the elections were stolen, Masih's newspaper was shut down, and thousands of Iranians were arrested. She was expelled from her own country, and separated from her only son. Although she eventually was able to take her son abroad, she has not returned to Iran or seen her family in years. To this day, Masih has faith that one day she will be reunited with her homeland.A defiant, inspiring voice for women's rights, Masih Alinejad speaks for women everywhere.'Intriguing and inspiring . . . her voice is so important to the Iranian people's struggles for freedom and democracy' Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran

Corsair

This Is Yesterday

Rose Ruane
Authors:
Rose Ruane

Alone and adrift in London, Peach is heading into her mid-forties with nothing to show for her youthful promise but a stalled art career and a stopgap job in a Mayfair gallery she's been doing for a decade.She is too smart and independent to believe her unhappiness will be cured by a relationship and a baby, too sad and lonely to break her cycle of drunken hook ups and nervous breakdowns. She is too young to feel this tired, and far too old to feel this lost.When Peach is woken one night with news that her father, who has Alzheimer's disease, is in intensive care, she can no longer outrun the summer of secrets and sexual awakenings that augured twenty-five years of estrangement from her family. Now, as they all gather in the hospital, past and present collide, forcing Peach to confront the consequences of her actions and inactions throughout the years.This Is Yesterday is a story of a woman's relationship with her art, her body and desires, her memories, herself. It is a story of beginning, ending and becoming.

Hachette Audio

Outrages

Naomi Wolf
Authors:
Naomi Wolf

The bestselling author of Vagina illuminates a dramatic history - how a single English law in 1857 led to a maelstrom, with reverberations lasting down to our day. That law was the Obscene Publications Act and it was a crucial turning point. Why? Because dissent and morality; 'deviancy' and 'normalcy'; unprintable and printable were suddenly lawful concepts in the modern sense. This new law effectively invented modern obscenity. Before 1857 it wasn't 'homosexuality' - a term that didn't yet exist - that was a crime, but simply the act of sodomy. But in a single stroke, not only was love between men illegal, but anything referring to this love also became obscene, unprintable, unspeakable. And writers, editors and printers became the gatekeepers with a responsibility to uphold the morals of the society - followed by serious criminal penalties if they didn't. And as the act evolved, joined by other laws against sexual representation and speech, making their way to courts, the authors' or artists' intentions were deemed immaterial. What mattered was if the work in question had a 'tendency . . . to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences, and into whose hands a publication of this sort may fall'. Wolf paints the dramatic ways this set of laws and consolidation of what we would call homophobia and censorship, played out among a bohemian group of sexual dissidents, including Walt Whitman in America and the homosexual English critic John Addington Symonds - in love with Whitman's homoerotic voice in Leaves of Grass - decades before the infamous 1895 trial of Oscar Wilde. She retrieves forgotten history of men and even young teenage boys, executed at the Old Bailey for 'sodomy' or even 'the attempt'. Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante and Christina Rossetti, Walter Pater and painter Simeon Solomon, were among the writers and artists, and countless booksellers and printers, whose lives were shadowed with jeopardy from this emerging network of laws against speech and love. She depicts both a fascinating story and, crucially, an important way of understanding how we arrived at our ideas of 'normalcy' and 'deviancy' - and the idea of the state's purported need and right to police speech - ideas which are with us to this day. Most powerfully, Wolf recounts how a dying Symonds helped write the book on 'sexual inversion' that created our modern understanding of homosexuality. She argues that his secret memoir, mined and explained here fully for the first time, together with a secretly published essay, evolved into what would become the first mainstream gay rights manifesto in the west - proving that the literature of love will ultimately triumph over censorship.

Seal Press

She the People

Jen Deaderick
Authors:
Jen Deaderick

In March 2017, Nevada surprised the rest of the country by suddenly ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, thirty-five years after the deadline had passed. The ERA is now just two states short of total ratification. Two states and a legacy of shame are standing between American women and full equality.She the People takes on the campaign for change by offering a sweeping, highly illustrated, sometimes sarcastic look at women's rights and citizenship. Journalist, historian, and activist Jen Deaderick takes readers on a walk down the ERA's rocky road to become part of our Constitution. Divided into 12 historical periods between 1776 and today, each era highlights specific changes in the legal status of women along with the significant cultural and social influences of the time, so women's history is understood as an integral part of U.S. history, rather than a tangential sideline.Clever and dynamic, She the People is informative, entertaining, and a vital reminder that women still aren't fully accepted as equal citizens in America.

Little, Brown

So Here's the Thing

Alyssa Mastromonaco
Authors:
Alyssa Mastromonaco

From the New York Times bestselling author of Who Thought This Was a Good Idea? comes a fun, frank book of reflections, essays and interviews on topics ranging from politics and career to motherhood, sisterhood and making and sustaining relationships of all kinds in the age of social media.Alyssa Mastromonaco is back with a bold, no-nonsense and no-holds-barred twenty-first-century girl's guide to life, tackling the highs and lows of bodies, politics, relationships, parents, education, life on the internet and pop culture. Whether discussing Barbra Streisand or The Bachelor, working in the West Wing or working on finding a wing woman, Alyssa leaves no stone unturned . . . and no awkward situation unexamined.Like her bestseller Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?, So Here's the Thing brings a sharp eye and outsize sense of humor to the myriad issues facing women the world over, both in and out of the workplace. Along with Alyssa's personal experiences and hard-won life lessons, interviews with women like Monica Lewinsky, Susan Rice and Chelsea Handler round out this modern woman's guide to, well, just about everything you can think of.

Constable

Woke

Titania McGrath
Authors:
Titania McGrath

The most important debut you'll read this year - from Twitter sensation Titania McGrathIn Woke, Titania McGrath demonstrates how everybody can play their part in the pursuit of social justice. As a millennial icon on the forefront of online activism, Titania is uniquely placed to guide her readers through the often bewildering array of terminology and concepts that constitute twenty-first-century 'wokeness'. These new ideas often leave the general public bemused, particularly if they don't read the Guardian.Being woke is actually much easier than people think. As Titania demonstrates, anyone can be an activist. By simply adding a rainbow flag to your Facebook profile, or calling out an elderly person who doesn't understand what 'non-binary' means, you can change the world for the better. Indeed, social media has now made it possible to show how virtuous you are without having to do anything at all.Timely and indispensable, Titania's step-by-step guide will help you to become the woke person you need to be in an increasingly progressive world. In a non-patronising manner, Titania will explain why you are wrong about everything and how to become more like her.

Virago

Corregidora

Gayl Jones
Authors:
Gayl Jones
Sphere

This Will Only Hurt a Little

Busy Philipps
Authors:
Busy Philipps
Virago

The Guilty Feminist

Deborah Frances-White
Authors:
Deborah Frances-White

'This really is the "everything you have always wanted to know about feminism but were afraid to ask" manual. From a mind as lucid and witty as it is kind and empathetic comes essential reading for the planet.' EMMA THOMPSONIn 2015 I described myself as 'guilty feminist' for the first time. My goals were noble but my concerns were trivial. I desperately wanted to close the pay gap, but I also wanted to look good sitting down naked.A funny, joyful, frank and inspiring book about embracing both feminism and our imperfections, from the creator of the hit comedy podcast, Deborah Frances-White.From inclusion to the secret autonomy in rom coms, from effective activism to what poker can tell us about power structures, Deborah explores what it means to be a twenty-first-century feminist, and encourages us to make the world better for everyone.The book also includes exclusive interviews with performers, activists and thinkers - Jessamyn Stanley, Zoe Coombs Marr, Susan Wokoma, Bisha K. Ali, Reubs Walsh, Becca Bunce, Amika George, Mo Mansfied and Leyla Hussein - plus a piece from Hannah Gadsby.Praise for THE GUILTY FEMINIST podcast:'Hilarious, irreverent, eternally surprising, classy as hell, genius comedians ... It's shows like this that breathe life into conversations about feminism' Phoebe Waller-Bridge'Tackles issues from democracy to sexuality to porn with a lightness and hilarity that makes even the newly ordained feminist feel at home' Scarlett Curtis, Sunday Times'Wildly successful ... The Guilty Feminist addresses the major feminist issues of the twenty-first century while also celebrating our glorious imperfections' Marie Claire Australia

Virago

Fruit of Knowledge

Liv Strömquist
Authors:
Liv Strömquist

'How I loved reading Liv Strömquist's Fruit of Knowledge. Mostly, this was down to its sheer, punchy brilliance ... If her strips are clever, angry, funny and righteous, they're also informative to an eye-popping degree ... Every page is so fantastically acute' Rachel Cooke, Observer Graphic Novel of the MonthFrom Adam and Eve to pussy hats, people have punished, praised, pathologised and politicised vulvas, vaginas, clitorises, and menstruation. In the international bestseller Fruit of Knowledge, celebrated Swedish cartoonist Liv Strömquist traces how different cultures and traditions have shaped women's health and beyond. Her biting, informed commentary and ponytailed avatar guides the reader from the darkest chapters of history (a clitoridectomy performed on a five-year-old American child as late as 1948) to the lightest (vulvas used as architectural details as a symbol of protection). Like Alison Bechdel and Jacky Fleming, she uses the comics medium to reveal uncomfortable truths about how far we haven't come.'Just the thing for all the feminists in your life' Observer Books of the Year'This book made me laugh in public (and also cry a little). It is the book I gave to my younger sister the next time I saw her because of its anger and brilliance and because it is an overwhelming source of knowledge about things we should all already know' Daisy Johnson, author of the Man Booker Prize-shortlisted Everything Under 'There are moments of genuine hilarity, as when Strömquist pictures the dinner party chatter of men living under a matriarchy, and others of fierce anger in this wild, witty and vital book' Observer Books of the Year

Grand Central Publishing

Choose Your Own Disaster

Dana Schwartz
Authors:
Dana Schwartz
Corsair

Ayiti

Roxane Gay
Authors:
Roxane Gay
Corsair

Hunger

Roxane Gay
Authors:
Roxane Gay

'I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.'New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as "wildly undisciplined," Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties-including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life-and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life.With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen. Hunger is a deeply personal memoir from one of our finest writers, and tells a story that hasn't yet been told but needs to be.

Robinson

A Woman Lived Here

Allison Vale
Authors:
Allison Vale
Hachette Books

Knowing Your Value

Mika Brzezinski
Authors:
Mika Brzezinski

Why are women so often overlooked and underpaid? In Knowing Your Value , the prequel to her new book Grow Your Value, bestselling author Mika Brzezinski takes an in-depth look at how women today achieve their deserved recognition and financial worth.Prompted by her own experience as co-host of Morning Joe, Mika interviewed a number of prominent women across a wide range of industries on their experience moving up in their fields. Mika shares the surprising stories of such power players as presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett, comedian Susie Essman, writer and director Nora Ephron, Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, television personality Joy Behar, and many others. Mika also gets honest answers from the likes of Donny Deutsch, Jack Welch, Donald Trump, and others about why women are paid less, and what pitfalls women face , and play into. Knowing Your Value blends personal stories with the latest research on why many women don't negotiate their compensation, why negotiating aggressively usually backfires, the real reasons why the gender wage gap persists, and what can be done about it.Written in Mika's brutally honest, funny, and self-deprecating style, Knowing Your Value is a vital book for professional women of all ages.