Charles Allen - A Mountain In Tibet - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Paperback £10.99
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    • ISBN:9780349139388
    • Publication date:10 Jan 2013

A Mountain In Tibet

The Search for Mount Kailas and the Sources of the Great Rivers of Asia

By Charles Allen

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A classic book from the bestselling travel writer and historian, Charles Allen, author of Plain Tales from the Raj, first published by Abacus in 1983.

Throughout the East there runs a legend of a great mountain at the centre of the world, where four rivers have their source. Charles Allen traces this legend to Western Tibet where there stands Kailas, worshipped by Hindus and Buddhists alike as the home of their gods and the navel of the world. Close by are the sources of four mighty rivers: the sacred Ganges, the Indus, the Sutlej and Tsangpo-Brahmaputra.

For centuries Kailas remained an enigma to the outside world. Then a succession of remarkable men took up the challenge of penetrating the hostile, frozen wastelands beyond the Western Himalayas, culminating in the great age of discovery, the final years of the Victorian era.

A Mountain in Tibet is an extraordinary story of exploration and high adventure, full of the excitement and colour expected from the author of Plain Tales from the Raj.

Biographical Notes

Charles Allen is the author of a number of bestselling books about Indian and the colonial experience elsewhere. A traveller, historian and master storyteller he is one of the great chroniclers of India.

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  • ISBN: 9781405524971
  • Publication date: 17 Jan 2013
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  • Imprint: Abacus
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