Martin Millar - The Good Fairies Of New York - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748120710
    • Publication date:10 Jan 2011

The Good Fairies Of New York

With an introduction by Neil Gaiman

By Martin Millar

  • Paperback
  • £7.99

I owned it for five years before reading it, then lent my copy to someone I thought should read it, and never got it back. Do not make either of my mistakes. Read it now, and then make your friends buy their own copies. You'll thank me one day' Neil Gaiman

Morag and Heather, two eighteen-inch fairies with swords, green kilts and badly dyed hair fly through the window of the worst violinist in New York, an overweight and antisocial type named Dinnie, and vomit on his carpet.

Who they are, how they came to New York and what this has to do with the lovely Kerry - who lives across the street, and has Crohn's Disease, and is making a flower alphabet - and what this has to do with the other fairies (of all nationalities) of New York, not to mention the poor repressed fairies of Britain, is the subject of this book.

It has a war in it, and a most unusual production of Shakespeare's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM and Johnny Thunders' New York Dolls guitar solos. What more could anyone desire from a book?

Biographical Notes

Martin Millar was born in Glasgow, Scotland, but has lived in London for a long time. He has written a lot of things - novels and plays and short stories and articles. As Martin Scott, Millar writes the Thraxas series of books; the fist novel in this series won the World Fantasy Award in 2000.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780749954208
  • Publication date: 10 Jan 2011
  • Page count: 288
  • Imprint: Piatkus
Piatkus

The Goddess of Buttercups and Daisies

Martin Millar
Authors:
Martin Millar

Set in ancient Athens, The Goddess of Buttercups and Daisies is the new book from the celebrated author of The Good Fairies of New York and the Kalix Werewolf series. This is Martin Millar at his best, gently poking fun while tugging at our heart strings, surprising us with sudden and sharp insights into the life of the outsider. It comes complete with a struggling playwright (a little-known bloke called Aristophanes), excess cavorting, an assortment of divinities, the odd Amazon and some truly execrable poetry. Fans of Kalix, here you will find no laudanum but a lot of drinking. No carnage, but plenty of intrigue and danger. And humour (of course). And a love story. And a few very troublesome phalluses.Praise for Martin Millar'These mortals do keep on writing.' - The Goddess Athena 'It's not a bad book, I suppose.' The Poet Luxos (who might have given a more enthusiastic quote if Martin had let him write an introduction to the book LIKE HE PROMISED but unfortunately Martin is a prosaic soul with no true appreciation of lyric poetry)'Is there any more wine?' - Aristophanes

Piatkus

The Anxiety of Kalix the Werewolf

Martin Millar
Authors:
Martin Millar
Piatkus

Ruby and the Stone Age Diet

Martin Millar
Authors:
Martin Millar
Piatkus

Curse Of The Wolf Girl

Martin Millar
Authors:
Martin Millar
Piatkus

Lonely Werewolf Girl

Martin Millar
Authors:
Martin Millar

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