Harry S. Stout - American Aristocrats - Little, Brown Book Group

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American Aristocrats

A Family, a Fortune, and the Making of American Capitalism

By Harry S. Stout

  • Hardback
  • £25.00

From a renowned historian, the story of a prosperous early American family and the great middle class land grab that propelled the nation's staggering economic and territorial growth

The story of an ambitious family at the forefront of the great middle-class land grab that shaped early American capitalism

American Aristocrats is a multigenerational biography of the Andersons of Kentucky, a family of strivers who passionately believed in the promise of America. Beginning in 1773 with the family patriarch, a twice-wounded Revolutionary War hero, the Andersons amassed land throughout what was then the American west. As the eminent religious historian Harry S. Stout argues, the story of the Andersons is the story of America's experiment in republican capitalism. Congressmen, diplomats, and military generals, the Andersons enthusiastically embraced the emerging American gospel of land speculation. In the process, they became apologists for slavery and Indian removal, and worried anxiously that the volatility of the market might lead them to ruin.

Drawing on a vast store of Anderson family records, Stout reconstructs their journey to great wealth as they rode out the cataclysms of their time, from financial panics to the Civil War and beyond. Through the Andersons we see how the lure of wealth shaped American capitalism and the nation's continental aspirations.

Biographical Notes

Harry S. Stout is the Jonathan Edwards Professor of American Religious History at Yale University and lives in Branford, Connecticut.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780465098989
  • Publication date: 21 Dec 2017
  • Page count: 528
  • Imprint: Basic Books
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