Carol Grant Gould and James L. Gould - Animal Architects - Little, Brown Book Group

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Animal Architects

Building and the Evolution of Intelligence

By Carol Grant Gould and James L. Gould

  • Paperback
  • £15.99

Animal Architects masterfully investigates how the structure an animal builds reveals the inner workings of its mind. Beginning with instinct and the simple homes of solitary insects, and progressing to conditioning, the cognitive map," and the role of planning and insight, James and Carol Gould use the amazing engineering feats throughout the animal world to reach fascinating conclusions about animals' behavioural capabilities. From two of the world's most distinguished experts in animal behaviour, Animal Architects is a creative and accessible approach to understanding animal minds through the structures they build.

Animal Architects masterfully investigates how the structure an animal builds reveals the inner workings of its mind. Beginning with instinct and the simple homes of solitary insects, and progressing to conditioning, the cognitive map," and the role of planning and insight, James and Carol Gould use the amazing engineering feats throughout the animal world to reach fascinating conclusions about animals' behavioural capabilities. From two of the world's most distinguished experts in animal behaviour, Animal Architects is a creative and accessible approach to understanding animal minds through the structures they build.

Biographical Notes

James L. Gould is Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University and one of the world's leading experts in animal behaviour. His books include Ethology: The Mechanisms and Evolution of behaviour, the leading textbook on its subject and the last three editions of William T. Keeton's Biological Science, one of the leading introductory textbooks of biology for undergraduates. With Carol Grant Gould he was written The Animal Mind and The Honey Bee, both considered classic books on animal behaviour for lay audiences. They live in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780465028382
  • Publication date: 06 Mar 2012
  • Page count: 336
  • Imprint: Basic Books
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