Liv Strömquist - Fruit of Knowledge - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780349010724
    • Publication date:21 Aug 2018

Fruit of Knowledge

By Liv Strömquist

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

An international bestseller, Fruit of Knowledge is a funny, powerful and eye-opening graphic nonfiction book about the female body and our love-hate relationship with it throughout history.

'How I loved reading Liv Strömquist's Fruit of Knowledge. Mostly, this was down to its sheer, punchy brilliance ... If her strips are clever, angry, funny and righteous, they're also informative to an eye-popping degree ... Every page is so fantastically acute' Rachel Cooke, Observer Graphic Novel of the Month

From Adam and Eve to pussy hats, people have punished, praised, pathologised and politicised vulvas, vaginas, clitorises, and menstruation. In the international bestseller Fruit of Knowledge, celebrated Swedish cartoonist Liv Strömquist traces how different cultures and traditions have shaped women's health and beyond.

Her biting, informed commentary and ponytailed avatar guides the reader from the darkest chapters of history (a clitoridectomy performed on a five-year-old American child as late as 1948) to the lightest (vulvas used as architectural details as a symbol of protection). Like Alison Bechdel and Jacky Fleming, she uses the comics medium to reveal uncomfortable truths about how far we haven't come.

'Just the thing for all the feminists in your life' Observer Books of the Year

'There are moments of genuine hilarity, as when Strömquist pictures the dinner party chatter of men living under a matriarchy, and others of fierce anger in this wild, witty and vital book' Observer Books of the Year

Biographical Notes

Liv Strömquist was born in 1978 and lives in Malmö, Sweden. She has published seven graphic novels in Sweden. Her work draws on political and sociological theory, and often examines and analyzes different kinds of power. Fruit of Knowledge is her first book to appear in English and is being published in seventeen countries. Follow her on Instagram @leifstromquist.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349010731
  • Publication date: 21 Aug 2018
  • Page count: 144
  • Imprint: Virago
How I loved reading Liv Strömquist's Fruit of Knowledge. Mostly, this was down to its sheer, punchy brilliance: should you be in possession of a teenage daughter, you absolutely must buy it for her and all her friends, in addition to those copies you will now immediately purchase for yourself and all of yours . . . If her strips are clever, angry, funny and righteous, they're also informative to an eye-popping degree . . . every page is so fantastically acute — Rachel Cooke, Observer
Brilliantly drawn, cleverly researched and deeply funny — Times Literary Supplement
Impeccably researched [and] enormously funny ... Almost every page is so brilliantly and wittily written and unarguably righteous that it is constantly tempting to show the book to the nearest person. This is a sure sign that this is a work of unusual excellence. Buy two copies - one to read and keep and one to lend out - and make peace with the idea that you may need to get more in time — The Quietus
Feminist, snappy, instructive and hilarious! — Time Out Paris
Liv Strömquist's refreshing humour and visionary ability truly make me rejoice' — Goteborgs-Posten
Imagine if you could walk through the world with a Liv Strömquist at your side. The moment you stumbled on an injustice or an error in thinking, you could point her at the culprit like a loaded wit-revolver, instead of having to stand there digging through your own murky arguments — Expressen
Will appeal to fans of popular feminist authors like Caitlin Moran ... Through witty illustrations and punchy text, the book examines society's love-hate relationship with women's sexuality ... Buy it for your teenage granddaughter and have a peek yourself — The Lady
A lively, educational and anti-idiot oration on one of society's less comfortably discussed topics — Strong Words
There are moments of genuine hilarity, as when Strömquist pictures the dinner party chatter of men living under a matriarchy, and others of fierce anger in this wild, witty and vital book — Guardian
Fruit of Knowledge: The Vulva vs the Patriarchy, is just the thing for all the feminists in your life, particularly those of a younger generation — Observer Books of the Year
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