Eliot Weisman and Jennifer Valoppi - The Way It Was - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780316470094
    • Publication date:13 Dec 2018

The Way It Was

My Life with Frank Sinatra

By Eliot Weisman and Jennifer Valoppi

  • Hardback
  • £20.99

In the bestselling tradition of Henry Bushkin's Johnny Carson comes THE WAY IT WAS: My Life with Frank Sinatra, a frank and eye-opening inside look at the final decades of Sinatra's life, told by his long-time manager and friend, Eliot Weisman.

In the bestselling tradition of Henry Bushkin's Johnny Carson comes THE WAY IT WAS: My Life with Frank Sinatra, a candid and eye-opening inside look at the final decades of Sinatra's life, told by his long-time manager and friend, Eliot Weisman.

Eliot Weisman worked with Frank Sinatra from 1975 up until Sinatra's death in 1998, and became one of the singer's most trusted confidantes and advisers. In this book, Weisman tells the story of the final years of the iconic entertainer from within his exclusive inner circle--featuring original photos and filled with scintillating revelations that fans of all Sinatra stages--from the crooner to the Duets--will love.

Biographical Notes

Eliot Weisman (Author)
For two decades Eliot Weisman was the manager of Frank Sinatra. He is President of Premier Artists' Services and lives in Parkland, Florida.

Jennifer Valoppi (Author)
Jennifer Valoppi is a multi-Emmy Award winning TV journalist, an award winning author and social entrepreneur, and the founder of the Women of Tomorrow Mentorship & Scholarship program.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780316470087
  • Publication date: 28 Dec 2017
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Hachette Books
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