Evelyn McDonnell - Queens of Noise - Little, Brown Book Group

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Queens of Noise

The Real Story of the Runaways

By Evelyn McDonnell

  • Hardback
  • £17.99

In four years the teenage members of the Runaways did what no other group of female rock musicians before them could: they released four albums for a major label and toured the world. The Runaways busted down doors for every girl band that followed. Joan Jett, Sandy West, Cherrie Currie, lead guitarist Lita Ford, and bassists Jackie Fox and Vicky Blue were pre-punk bandits, fostering revolution girl style decades before that became a riot grrrl catchphrase.The story of the Runaways has never been told in its entirety. Drawing on interviews with most of this seminal rock band's former members as well as controversial manager Kim Fowley, Queens of Noise will look beyond the lurid voyeuristic appeal of a sex-drugs-rock 'n' roll saga to give the band its place in musical, feminist, and cultural history.

The first biography of The Runaways, told with the participation of all the surviving members, including Joan Jett and Lita Ford.

In four years the teenage members of the Runaways did what no other group of female rock musicians before them could: they released four albums for a major label and toured the world. The Runaways busted down doors for every girl band that followed. Joan Jett, Sandy West, Cherrie Currie, lead guitarist Lita Ford, and bassists Jackie Fox and Vicky Blue were pre-punk bandits, fostering revolution girl style decades before that became a riot grrrl catchphrase.The story of the Runaways has never been told in its entirety. Drawing on interviews with most of this seminal rock band's former members as well as controversial manager Kim Fowley, Queens of Noise will look beyond the lurid voyeuristic appeal of a sex-drugs-rock 'n' roll saga to give the band its place in musical, feminist, and cultural history.

Biographical Notes

Evelyn McDonnell, author or co-editor of five books, has been a pop music critic for the Miami Herald and a senior editor at the Village Voice. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780306820397
  • Publication date: 09 Jul 2013
  • Page count: 360
  • Imprint: Da Capo Press
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