John S. Lewis - Mining the Sky - Little, Brown Book Group

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Mining the Sky

Untold Riches From The Asteroids, Comets, And Planets

By John S. Lewis

  • Paperback
  • £11.99

While we worry over the depletion of the earth's natural resources, the pollution of our planet, and the challenges presented by the earth's growing population, billions of dollars worth of metals, fuels, and life-sustaining substances await us in nearby space. In this visionary book, noted planetary scientist John S. Lewis explains how we can mine these precious metals from the asteroids, comets, and planets in our own solar system for use in space construction projects. And this is just one of the possibilities. Join John S. Lewis as he contemplates milking the moons of Mars for water and hollowing out asteroids for space-bound homesteaders,all while demonstrating the economic and technical feasibility of plans that were once considered pure fiction.

While we worry over the depletion of the earth's natural resources, the pollution of our planet, and the challenges presented by the earth's growing population, billions of dollars worth of metals, fuels, and life-sustaining substances await us in nearby space. In this visionary book, noted planetary scientist John S. Lewis explains how we can mine these precious metals from the asteroids, comets, and planets in our own solar system for use in space construction projects. And this is just one of the possibilities. Join John S. Lewis as he contemplates milking the moons of Mars for water and hollowing out asteroids for space-bound homesteaders,all while demonstrating the economic and technical feasibility of plans that were once considered pure fiction.

Biographical Notes

John S. Lewis, author of Rain of Iron and Ice, is professor of planetary sciences and codirector of the Space Engineering Research centre at the University of Arizona-Tucson. He has chaired international conferences on space resources and is a globally recognized expert on the subject.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780201328196
  • Publication date: 23 Sep 1997
  • Page count: 274
  • Imprint: Basic Books
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