Frank Walker - The Tiger Man of Vietnam - Little, Brown Book Group

The Tiger Man of Vietnam

By Frank Walker

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

The Vietnamese hill tribes made him a demi-god. The CIA wanted to kill him. This is the remarkable true story of Australian war hero Barry Petersen. Frank Walker's critically acclaimed bestseller is now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.

'This book drips with adventure and intrigue'
THE AGE

In 1963, Australian Army Captain Barry Petersen was sent to Vietnam. It was one of the most tightly held secrets of the Vietnam War. Petersen was ordered to train and lead guerrilla squads of Montagnard tribesmen against the Viet Cong in the remote Central Highlands. He successfully formed a fearsome militia, named 'Tiger Men'.

A canny leader, he was courageous in battle, and his bravery saw him awarded the coveted Military Cross and worshipped by the hill tribes. But his success created enemies, not just within the Viet Cong. Some in US intelligence saw Petersen as having 'gone native' and were determined he had to go, by any means possible. He was lucky to make it out of the mountains alive.

THE TIGER MAN OF VIETNAM reveals the compelling true story of a little-known Australian war hero. Now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.

Biographical Notes

Frank Walker has been an Australian journalist and foreign correspondent in Germany and the United States for forty years, covering wars and coups, floods and fires, terrorist attacks and political brawls, movie stars and street crime. His first two bestselling books - The Tiger Man of Vietnam and Ghost Platoon - revealed uncomfortable truths about Australia's actions in the Vietnam War. His third bestselling book, Maralinga, lifted the veil of secrecy thrown over the British atomic bomb tests in the outback and shocking human experiments in Australia in the 1950s and 1960s. His fourth book, Commandos, examined the most daring secret raids behind enemy lines by Australians and New Zealanders in World War II. In 2017 Frank wrote Traitors, an exposé on how Australia and its allies betrayed our Anzacs and let Nazi and Japanese war criminals go free. His most recent book is The Scandalous Life of Freddie McEvoy: The true story of the swashbuckling Australian rogue.

He can be contacted via his website www.frankwalker.com.au

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780733636615
  • Publication date: 24 Nov 2016
  • Page count: 384
  • Imprint: Hachette Australia
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