Related to: 'The Self Illusion: Why There is No 'You' Inside Your Head (Extract)'

Basic Books

The Biological Mind

Alan Jasanoff
Authors:
Alan Jasanoff
Robinson

Blueprint

Lucy Maddox
Authors:
Lucy Maddox

From birth to adulthood, Blueprint tells you what you need to know about how you became who you areHave you ever wondered how your early life shaped you? From beginning to say simple words like 'mama' and learning how to walk around unaided, to the first day of school and forming new friendships, everyone has been a child. The roots of our adult selves go right back to our first experiences. How we think, act and interact is influenced by our early years, yet most people don't know the key findings from the juiciest child development studies that can give us insight into our adult selves. Weaving together cutting edge research, everyday experience and clinical examples, Dr Lucy Maddox explains how we develop from an unconscious bundle of cells floating about in the dark of the in uterine environment to to a fully grown complex adult, revealing fascinating insights about our personality, relationships and daily lives along the way.

Robinson

Who's in Charge?

Michael Gazzaniga
Authors:
Michael Gazzaniga
Constable

The Self Illusion

Bruce Hood
Authors:
Bruce Hood

Most of us believe that we possess a self - an internal individual who resides inside our bodies, making decisions, authoring actions and possessing free will. The feeling that a single, unified, enduring self inhabits the body - the 'me' inside me - is compelling and inescapable. This is how we interact as a social animal and judge each other's actions and deeds. But that sovereignty of the self is increasingly under threat from science as our understanding of the brain advances. Rather than a single entity, the self is really a constellation of mechanisms and experiences that create the illusion of the internal you.We only emerge as a product of those around us as part of the different storylines we inhabit from the cot to the grave. It is an ever changing character, created by the brain to provide a coherent interface between the multitude of internal processes and the external world demands that require different selves.

Robinson

The Believing Brain

Michael Shermer
Authors:
Michael Shermer

Synthesizing thirty years of research, psychologist and science historian, Michael Shermer upends the traditional thinking about how humans form beliefs about the world. Simply put, beliefs come first and explanations for beliefs follow. The brain, Shermer argues, is a belief engine. Using sensory data that flow in through the senses, the brain naturally looks for and finds patterns - and then infuses those patterns with meaning, forming beliefs. Once beliefs are formed, our brains subconsciously seek out confirmatory evidence in support of those beliefs, which accelerates the process of reinforcing them, and round and round the process goes in a positive-feedback loop.In The Believing Brain, Shermer provides countless real-world examples of how this process operates, from politics, economics, and religion to conspiracy theories, the supernatural, and the paranormal. Ultimately, he demonstrates why science is the best tool ever devised to determine whether or not our belief matches reality.

Constable

Supersense

Bruce Hood
Authors:
Bruce Hood

Why is it that Tony Blair always wore the same pair of shoes when answering Prime Minister's Questions? That John McEnroe notoriously refused to step on the white lines of a tennis court between points? And that President-elect Barack Obama played a game of basketball the morning of his victory in the Iowa primary, and continued the tradition the day of every following primary? Superstitious habits are common. Do you ever cross your fingers, knock on wood, avoid walking under ladders, or step around black cats? Sentimental value often supersedes material worth. If someone offered to replace your childhood teddy bear or wedding ring with a brand new, exact replica, would you do it? How about £20 for trying on a jumper owned by Fred West? Where do such feelings come from and why do most of us have them? Humans are born with brains designed to make sense of the world and that need for an explanation can lead to beliefs that go beyond reason. To be true they would have to be supernatural. With scientific education we learn that such beliefs are irrational but at an intuitive level they can be resistant to reason or lie dormant in otherwise sensible adults.It now seems unlikely that any effort to get rid of supernatural beliefs or superstitious behaviours will be completely successful. This is not all bad news - such beliefs are a useful glue that binds us together as a society. Combining brilliant insight with witty example Hood weaves a page-turning account of our 'supersense' that navigates a path through brain science, child development, popular culture, mental illness and the paranormal. After reading SuperSense, you will realize why you are not as reasonable as you might like to think - and why that might be no bad thing.

Constable

Supersense

Bruce Hood
Authors:
Bruce Hood
Robinson

An Introduction to Coping with Panic

Charles Young
Authors:
Charles Young

Panic affects thousands of people in the UK and it can be effectively treated with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.Written by an experienced practitioner, this introductory booklet explains what panic attacks are and how they make you feel. It will help the reader to understand their symptoms and is ideal as an immediate coping strategy and as a preliminary to fuller therapy.How panic attacks develop and what keeps them going.The link between your thoughts and your panic attacks.Case studies.Breathing techniques.

Robinson

Overcoming Paranoid & Suspicious Thoughts

Daniel Freeman, Philippa Garety, Jason Freeman
Authors:
Daniel Freeman, Philippa Garety, Jason Freeman
Robinson

Overcoming Relationship Problems

Michael Crowe
Authors:
Michael Crowe

A Books on Prescription TitlePractical, proven and effective solutions for relationship problemsEveryday problems such as financial pressures, sexual and emotional problems, fidelity issues or the complications of second marriages can put unbearable pressure on relationships and family life. In this highly effective self-help guide, internationally respected couples therapist, Dr Michael Crowe, uses proven therapeutic strategies derived from family therapy to help you to overcome your relationship problems.Sustaining a long-term relationshipImproving communication with your partner and familyDealing with sexual problemsDeveloping negotiating skillsCoping with jealousy and other negative emotions

Brenda Hogan

Dr Brenda Hogan is a clinical psychologist who previously worked at the Primary Care Psychological Treatment Service in Cambridge. She has since moved to Vancouver, Canada, where she continues her work in psychological assessment and the provision of brief psychological treatment for anxiety and depression. Brenda and her colleagues have created a pioneering service in primary care based on self-help approaches to help alleviate a range of common psychological problems.

Bruce Hood

Bruce Hood is currently the Director of the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre in the Experimental Psychology Department at the University of Bristol. He has been a research fellow at Cambridge University and University College London, a visiting scientist at MIT and a faculty professor at Harvard.

Charles Young

Dr Charles Young is based in the Department of Psychology at Rhodes University, South Africa, where he has co-ordinated professional training programmes in clinical and counselling psychology. He previously worked at the Primary Care Psychological Treatment Service in Cambridge, UK. Much of his work involves the provision of brief psychological approaches to alleviate anxiety and depression. He helped to develop a pioneering service in primary care based on self-help approaches to help alleviate a range of common psychological problems.

Daniel Freeman

Daniel Freeman is Professor of Clinical Psychology and a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford

Jan Scott MD, FRCPsych

Jan Scott, an internationally renowned expert in the use of CBT in the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder, is the author of Overcoming Mood Swings. Head of Glasgow University's Department of Psychiatry, she is a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the International Association of Cognitive Psychotherapists. She is also a trustee of the Mental Health Foundation.

Jason Freeman

Jason Freeman is an experienced writer and editor.

Leonora Brosan

Dr Lee Brosan is a consultant psychologist with the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust. Over a long career she has been Head of the Psychological Treatment Service, Trust Lead for the Development of Psychological Therapies, Clinical Associate at the MRC Cognitive and Brain Science Unit in Cambridge, a founder member of the Cambridge Clinical Research Centre for Affective Disorders, and Associate Lecturer in the Experimental Psychology Department at Cambridge.

Michael Crowe

Dr. Michael Crowe was a founder member of both the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy (BABCP) and the Institute of Family Therapy in London. He worked as a psychiatrist for almost 30 years at the Maudsley Hospital, London and was honorary Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry (Kings College, London). Since retirement he works in private practise and continues to teach and lecture.

Niklas Törneke

Niklas Törneke, MD, is a psychiatrist and has worked as a senior psychiatrist in the department of general psychiatry in his hometown Kalmar (in the southeast of Sweden) from 1991 until he started private practice 1998. He earned license as a psychotherapist in 1996 and was originally trained as a cognitive therapist. Since 1998 he has worked mainly with acceptance and commitment therapy, both in his own practice and as a teacher and clinical supervisor. His clinical experience ranges from psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia to common anxiety and mood disorders with high prevalence in the general population.

Philippa Garety

Philippa Garety is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London.