Related to: 'This Is an Uprising'

PublicAffairs

The Trade

Jere Van Dyk
Authors:
Jere Van Dyk

In 2008, American journalist Jere Van Dyk was kidnapped and held for 45 days. At the time, he had no idea who his kidnappers were. They demanded a ransom and the release of three of their comrades from Guantanamo, yet they hinted at their ties to Pakistan and to the Haqqani network, a uniquely powerful group that now holds the balance of power in large parts of Afghanistan and the tribal areas of Pakistan. After his release, Van Dyk wrote a book about his capture and what it took to survive in this most hostile of circumstances. Yet he never answered the fundamental questions that his kidnapping raised: Why was he taken? Why was he released? And who saved his life?Every kidnapping is a labyrinth in which the certainties of good and bad, light and dark are merged in the quiet dialogues and secret handshakes that accompany a release or a brutal fatality. In The Trade, Jere Van Dyk uses the sinuous path of his own kidnapping to explain the recent rise in the taking of Western hostages across the greater Middle East. He discovers that he was probably not taken by the anonymous "Taliban," as he thought, but by the very people who helped arrange his trip and then bargained for his release. It was not a matter of chance: CBS, Van Dyk's employer at the time, launched a secret rescue and, he learned later, paid an undisclosed ransom to a tribal chief who controlled the area in which he was kidnapped and who delivered him and his guide safely to a US Army base. In 2013, Van Dyk returned to the Middle East to unravel the links among jihadist groups, specifically that of the Haqqani network. His investigation finally paid off in 2015, when Van Dyk was taken to a discreet room in a guesthouse in Islamabad where he met Ibrahim Haqqani, part of the leadership of the Haqqani network who has been seen by very few outsiders since 9/11. There, Van Dyk learned of the Haqqanis' links to Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, the ISI, and the CIA and their involvement in the kidnapping of Bowe Bergdahl and many others. Back in the United States, Van Dyk saw the other side of the kidnapping labyrinth as he became involved with other former hostages and the families of recent kidnapping victims murdered by the Islamic State. Van Dyk's investigation shows how America's foreign policy strategy, the terrible cynicism of the kidnappers, and a world of shadowy interlocutors who play both sides of many bargains combine to create a brutal business out of the exchange of individual human lives for vast sums of money.

Westview Press

International Studies (Fourth Edition)

Sheldon Anderson, Mark Allen Peterson, Stanley W. Toops
Authors:
Sheldon Anderson, Mark Allen Peterson, Stanley W. Toops

This core text is the first to provide a much-needed interdisciplinary approach to international studies. Emphasizing the interconnected nature of history, geography, anthropology, economics, and political science, International Studies details the methodologies and subject matter of each discipline then applies these discipline lenses to seven regions: Europe; East Asia and the Pacific; South and Central Asia; sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; Latin America; and North America. This disciplinary and regional combination provides an indispensable, cohesive framework for understanding global issues.The fully updated fourth edition includes four new global issues chapters: The Refugee Crisis in Europe; The Syrian Civil War and the Rise of the Islamic State; Global Climate Change; and The Globalization of Modern Sports.

PublicAffairs

All the Kremlin's Men

Mikhail Zygar
Authors:
Mikhail Zygar
PublicAffairs

Don't Wait for the Next War

Wesley K. Clark
Authors:
Wesley K. Clark
Twelve

The Time Of Our Lives

Peggy Noonan
Authors:
Peggy Noonan

Peggy Noonan is one of the most brilliant and influential political thinkers and writers of our time. The author of five bestselling books (What I Saw at the Revolution is now a classic), her column in The Wall Street Journal is a must-read for millions of Americans. Witty, incisive and always original, Peggy Noonan is a conservative intellectual with wide reaching appeal across the political spectrum. Now, for the first time, the best of Noonan's writing will be collected in one indispensable volume. With a special, original introduction, she chronicles her career in journalism, the Reagan White House, and the political arena. Annotated and analysed throughout, Peggy expands a lifetime of wonderful writing into an astute examination of American life.

PublicAffairs

935 Lies

Charles Lewis
Authors:
Charles Lewis

Facts are and must be the coin of the realm in a democracy, for government "of the people, by the people and for the people," requires and assumes to some extent an informed citizenry. Unfortunately, for citizens in the United States and throughout the world, distinguishing between fact and fiction has always been a formidable challenge, often with real life and death consequences. But now it is more difficult and confusing than ever. The Internet Age makes comment indistinguishable from fact, and erodes authority. It is liberating but annihilating at the same time. For those wielding power, whether in the private or the public sector, the increasingly sophisticated control of information is regarded as utterly essential to achieving success. Internal information is severely limited, including calendars, memoranda, phone logs and emails. History is sculpted by its absence.Often those in power strictly control the flow of information, corroding and corrupting its content, of course, using newspapers, radio, television and other mass means of communication to carefully consolidate their authority and cover their crimes in a thick veneer of fervent racialism or nationalism. And always with the specter of some kind of imminent public threat, what Hannah Arendt called'objective enemies.'"An epiphanic, public comment about the Bush "war on terror" years was made by an unidentified White House official revealing how information is managed and how the news media and the public itself are regarded by those in power: "[You journalists live] "in what we call the reality-based community. [But] that's not the way the world really works anymore. We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality . . . we're history's actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do." And yet, as aggressive as the Republican Bush administration was in attempting to define reality, the subsequent, Democratic Obama administration may be more so. Into the battle for truth steps Charles Lewis, a pioneer of journalistic objectivity. His book looks at the various ways in which truth can be manipulated and distorted by governments, corporations, even lone individuals. He shows how truth is often distorted or diminished by delay: truth in time can save terrible erroneous choices. In part a history of communication in America, a cri de coeur for the principles and practice of objective reporting, and a journey into several notably labyrinths of deception, 935 Lies is a valorous search for honesty in an age of casual, sometimes malevolent distortion of the facts.

PublicAffairs

Find, Fix, Finish

Aki Peritz, Eric Rosenbach
Authors:
Aki Peritz, Eric Rosenbach

On 9/11 the U.S. had effectively no counterterrorism doctrine. Fast forward ten years: Osama bin Laden is dead al Qaeda is organizationally ruined and pinned in the tribal areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan there has been no major attack on American soil and while there has been at least one instance of a massive planned attack, it was crushed by the greatest international collaboration of intelligence services seen since the end of the Cold War. It's been a remarkable transformation. Aki Peritz and Eric Rosenbach have experienced first-hand the monumental strategy changes in our country's counterterrorism strategy within the intelligence, defence, and political communities. In this book, they show how America learned to be very good at taking on the terrorists, often one at a time, in ever more lethally incisive operations. They offer new details behind some headlines from the last decade. They are frank about the mistakes that have been made. And they explain how a concept coined by General Grant during the Civil War has been reinvented in the age of satellite technology to manage a globally distributed foe, allowing the U.S. to find, fix, and finish its enemies.

Basic Books

Libertarianism, from A to Z

Jeffrey A. Miron
Authors:
Jeffrey A. Miron
Basic Books

Dismantling America

Thomas Sowell
Authors:
Thomas Sowell
Westview Press

The Legacy of George W. Bush's Foreign Policy

Ilan Peleg
Authors:
Ilan Peleg

p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt"This volume incisively analyzes the foreign policy of George W. Bush. Examining the legacy of the forty-third President, author Ilan Peleg explains the complex factors underlying the Bush Doctrine: neoconservative ideology, real and perceived challenges to US world supremacy, Bush's personality, the White House's unique decision-making process, and the impact of September 11. Peleg argues that in its shift from deterrence and containment to prevention and preemption, from multilateral leadership to unilateral militarism, and from consensual realism to radical neoconservatism, the Bush administration has effected a true revolution in the foundational goals, as well as in the means, of US foreign policy. p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt" p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt"Peleg also offers a series of judicious recommendations for future administrations, including the reestablishment of a bipartisan consensus on foreign policy, increased emphasis on multilateralism, the demilitarization of US foreign policy, renewed focus on the resolution of serious regional conflicts, and more realistic expectations about noncoerced democratization around the world.

Westview Press

Military Leadership

Robert L. Taylor, William E. Rosenbach, Eric B. Rosenbach
Authors:
Robert L. Taylor, William E. Rosenbach, Eric B. Rosenbach

p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt"The sixth edition of this classic text continues its popular interdisciplinary approach to the topic of leadership by examining fundamental elements of military leadership: the"process&rdquo of leadership, the dynamic personal interactions between leader and followers, and the individual and organizational values that foster effective military leadership. Military Leadership provides a thoroughly reconsidered and greatly expanded mix of classic and contemporary articles as well as original essays, with authors representing all of the services. Incisive introductory essays to each section highlight themes and connections. Eric B. Rosenbach joins the editorial team for this edition, helping infuse the text with fresh perspectives. The essays of the sixth edition confront the kudos and criticisms that surround military leadership today, offer international viewpoints, and relate military leadership to contemporary leadership theory and approaches.

Basic Books

Trading with the Enemy

Tom Miller
Authors:
Tom Miller

Havana knew me by my shoes," begins Tom Miller's lively and entertaining account of his sojourn for more than eight months traveling through Cuba, mixing with its literati and black marketers, its cane cutters and cigar rollers. Granted unprecedented access to travel throughout the country, the author presents us with a rare insight into one of the world's only Communist countries. Its best-known personalities and ordinary citizens talk to him about the U.S. embargo and tell their favourite Fidel jokes as they stand in line for bread at the Socialism or Death Bakery. Miller provides a running commentary on Cuba's food shortages, exotic sensuality, and baseball addiction as he follows the scents of Graham Greene, José Marti, Ernest Hemingway, and the Mambo Kings. The result of this informed and adventurous journey is a vibrant, rhythmic portrait of a land and people too long shielded from American eyes.

Bruce Cannon Gibney

Bruce Cannon Gibney is a venture capitalist and writer. An early investor in PayPal, he later joined Founders Fund, where he and his colleagues funded Facebook, Spotify, Palantir Technologies, Elon Musk's SpaceX, Airbnb, Lyft, and other start-ups.

Jere Van Dyk

Jere Van Dyk was born in Washington state and raised in a family of Plymouth Brethren. He first went to Afghanistan in 1973 when he and his younger brother drove an old Volkswagen from Germany to Kabul. He returned in 1981 as a young reporter for the New York Times and lived with the mujahideen, our allies fighting the Soviet Union. There, and later when he became the director of Friends of Afghanistan, a non-profit organization overseen by the National Security Council and the State Department, he got to know the leaders who were linked from the beginning with al-Qaeda, and the Taliban, with Iran, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia, and from which emerged the Islamic State. After 9/11, he returned to Afghanistan and Pakistan for CBS News, for which he covered the kidnapping of Daniel Pearl in Karachi. In 2008, he was the next American journalist kidnapped in Pakistan. He is the author of Captive and In Afghanistan.

Marc Lynch

Marc Lynch is professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, where he is the director of the Institute for Middle East Studies and of the Project on Middle East Political Science. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, and a contributing editor at the Monkey Cage blog for The Washington Post. He is the codirector of the Blogs and Bullets project at the US Institute of Peace. He formerly launched and edited the Middle East Channel on ForeignPolicy.com. His most recent book, The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East, was called "the most illuminating and, for policymakers, the most challenging" book yet written on the topic by The Economist. His other books include Voices of the New Arab Public: Iraq Al-Jazeera, and Middle East Politics Today, selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Book, and State Interests and Public Spheres: The International Politics of Jordan's Identity. Follow him on Twitter @abuaardvark.

Michael Savage

On air for 20 years, MICHAEL SAVAGE has millions of listeners for his #1 streaming radio show. The Savage Nation is one of the top radio talk programs in America, broadcast on over 225 stations. A prolific New York Times bestselling author, Dr. Savage has been profiled inPlayboy and The New Yorker and he has been awarded the Freedom of Speech Award from Talkers magazine. He received his Ph.D. in epidemiology and nutrition sciences from the University of California at Berkeley.

Mikhail Zygar

Mikhail Zygar is the former editor in chief of the only independent TV station in Russia, TV Rain (Dozhd). Previously, he worked for Newsweek Russia and the business daily Kommersant. Zygar was awarded the 2014 International Press Freedom Award by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Morgan Simon

Morgan Simon is a widely-recognized leader in impact investment who builds bridges between finance and social justice. Over the past 17 years, she has influenced over $150 Billion from high net worth individuals, foundations and endowments. She is the Managing Director of Pi Investments, in addition to supporting impact investments at the Libra Foundation, and is also co-founder and chair of the non-profit Transform Finance. Previously, she served as the founding CEO of Toniic, a global network of impact investors, and as the founding executive director of the Responsible Endowments Coalition. She has also worked with the United Nations in Honduras, in corporate reform with ForestEthics, and in domestic microfinance with the Women's Initiative for Self-Employment. She currently serves on the boards of the Restaurant Opportunity Center, The Working World and CARE Enterprises. A graduate of Swarthmore College, Simon serves as an adjunct professor at Middlebury College's graduate school program. She lives in the Bay Area.

Peter Jones

Peter Jones was a senior lecturer in Classics who published the best-selling Reading Latin and Reading Ancient Greek and now writes regularly for The Times, Daily Telegraph, Guardian and Spectator, as well as beginning a new series on Radio Four. David Dare-Plumpton has an MA in Classics and is a regular compiler of crosswords for the national press.

Roger Thurow

Roger Thurow is a senior fellow for global agriculture and food policy at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He was a reporter at the Wall Street Journal for 30 years. He is, with Scott Kilman, the author of Enough: Why the World's Poorest Starve in an Age of Plenty, which won the Harry Chapin WhyHunger award and was a finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and for the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award; and the author of The Last Hunger Season. He is a 2009 recipient of the Action Against Hunger Humanitarian Award. A long time Chicagoan, he now lives near Washington, DC.