Related to: 'Liars, Leakers and and Liberals'

Center Street

Back in the Game

Steve Scalise, Jeffrey E. Stern
Authors:
Steve Scalise, Jeffrey E. Stern

On the morning of June 14, 2017, at a practice field for the annual Congressional Baseball Game, a man opened fire on the Republican team, wounding five, including Louisiana Congressman Steve Scalise nearly fatally.In heart-pounding fashion, Scalise's minute-by-minute account tells not just his own harrowing story of barely surviving this horrific attack, but the stories of heroes who emerged in the seconds after the shooting began; in the minutes, hours, and days after he suffered a devastating gunshot wound, in order to save his life and the lives of his friends.Scalise delves into the backgrounds of each hero, seeking to understand how everyone wound up right where they needed to be, right when they needed to be there, and in possession of just the knowledge and experience they needed in order to save his life. Scalise takes us through each miracle, and each person who experienced it. He brings us the story of Rep. Brad Wenstrup, an Army Reserve officer and surgeon whose experience serving in combat in Iraq prepared him to save Scalise's life that day; of the members of his security detail who acted with nearly cinematic courage; of the police, paramedics, helicopter pilots and trauma team who came together to save his life. It tells, most importantly, of the citizens from all over America, who came together in ways big and small to help one grateful man, and whose prayers lifted Scalise up, during the worst of his hospitalization.As we follow the gripping, heart pounding, and ultimately inspiring story, we begin to learn what Scalise was experiencing in real time; That Americans look out for each other; that there is far more uniting us than dividing us.

Basic Books

Unsavory Truth

Marion Nestle
Authors:
Marion Nestle
Basic Books

Fierce Enigmas

Srinath Raghavan
Authors:
Srinath Raghavan

In Fierce Enigmas, prize-winning historian Srinath Raghavan argues that we cannot understand the US's entanglement in South Asia without first understanding the long sweep of American interaction with the nations and peoples who comprise it. Starting with the first attempts by Americans in the late eighteenth century to gain a foothold in the India trade, Raghavan narrates the forgotten role of American merchants, missionaries, and travelers in the history of region. For these early adventurers and exploiters, South Asia came to be seen not just as an arena of trade and commerce, but also as a site for American efforts-religious and secular-to remake the world in its own image. By the 1930s, American economic interests and ideals had converged in support for decolonization; not only should the peoples of the region be free to determine their own governments and futures, but they should be fully integrated into a liberal capitalist global order. These dreams were partially realized after the Second World War, with Indian Independence and Partition in 1947-and with Britain no longer in the picture, US involvement in the region steadily increased, in the form of short-sighted and ultimately counterproductive policies. In the 1950s, the Truman administration centered its approach to South Asia on the containment of communism, thereby helping split the region in two: while Pakistan was eager for American weapons and military support, India's Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru refused to align with either the US or the Soviet Union. In the 1970s, the US chose to support Islamists in Afghanistan, seeing them as a bulwark against communist advance. Yet Pakistan would become a formidable adversary for the US, while the militants in Afghanistan would eventually be using their arms against American troops. Time and time again, India, Pakistan, and to a lesser extent Afghanistan have each managed to extract commitments and concessions from the US that have served mostly to fuel the fires of nationalism and sectarianism, even as signs of liberalization have continued to entice American policymakers. Drawing on a vast and diverse array of official documents and private correspondence, Raghavan has written a sweeping, definitive history of the US in South Asia that at the same time suggests the many challenges ahead.

Center Street

Trump's America

Newt Gingrich
Authors:
Newt Gingrich

Center Street

Robert F. Kennedy: Ripples of Hope

Kerry Kennedy
Authors:
Kerry Kennedy

Hachette Books

The War on Normal People

Andrew Yang
Authors:
Andrew Yang

The shift toward automation is about to create a tsunami of unemployment. Not in the distant future--now. One recent estimate predicts 13 million American workers will lose their jobs within the next seven years-jobs that won't be replaced. In a future marked by restlessness and chronic unemployment, what will happen to American society?In The War on Normal People, Andrew Yang paints a dire portrait of the American economy. Rapidly advancing technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics and automation software are making millions of Americans' livelihoods irrelevant. The consequences are these trends are already being felt across our communities in the form of political unrest, drug use, and other social ills. The future looks dire-but is it unavoidable?In The War on Normal People, Yang imagines a different future - one in which having a job is distinct from the capacity to prosper and seek fulfillment. At this vision's core is Universal Basic Income, the concept of providing all citizens with a guaranteed income-and one that is rapidly gaining popularity among forward-thinking politicians and economists. Yang proposes that UBI is an essential step toward a new, more durable kind of economy, one he calls "human capitalism."

PublicAffairs

The Storm Before the Storm

Mike Duncan
Authors:
Mike Duncan
Nation Books

How to Kill a City

Peter Moskowitz, Peter Moskowitz
Authors:
Peter Moskowitz, Peter Moskowitz

While the mainstream media publishes style pieces about mustached hipsters brewing craft beers in warehouses in Brooklyn, global businessmen are remaking entire cities. While new coffee shops open for business in previously affordable neighborhoods, residents ignore the multi-million-dollar tax giveaways that have enabled real estate developers to build skyscrapers on top of brownstones.As journalist Peter Moskowitz shows in How to Kill a City, gentrification is not a fad or a trend. Hipsters and yuppies have more buying power than the neighbors they often displace, but individual actors cannot control housing markets and remake cities on their own. Nor can gentrification be fully explained by developers either: while they might have similar interests, the part-time house flipper who owns five houses in New Orleans and the condo owner in Detroit do not coordinate policy with each other. There's a losing side and a winning side in gentrification, but both sides are playing the same game--they are not its designers.How to Kill a City uncovers the massive, systemic, capitalist forces that push poor people out of cities and lure the young "creative class." Gentrification, Moskowitz argues, is the logical consequence of racist, historic housing policies and the inevitable result of a neoliberalized economy: with little federal funding for housing, transportation, or anything else, American cities are now forced to rely completely on their tax base to fund basic services, and the richer a city's tax base, the easier those services are to fund.Moskowitz explores the changing landscapes of four cities--New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York--and captures the lives that have been altered by gentrification. He also identifies the policies and policymakers who paved the way for the remaking of these cities. When we think of gentrification of some mysterious, inevitable process, we accept its consequences: the displacement of countless thousands of families, the destruction of cultures, the decreased affordability of life for everyone. How to Kill a City serves as a counterweight to hopelessness about the future of urban America that enables readers to see cities are shaped by powerful interests, and that if we identify those interests, we can begin to control them.

Basic Books

Trading with the Enemy

Tom Miller
Authors:
Tom Miller
Basic Books

The End Of Utopia

Russell Jacoby
Authors:
Russell Jacoby

Andrew Yang

Andrew Yang is the founder of Venture for America, a major non-profit that places top college graduates in start-ups for two years in emerging U.S. cities to generate job growth and train the next generation of entrepreneurs. Yang has been the CEO, co-founder or executive at a number of technology and education companies. Yang was named a Presidential Ambassador of Global Entrepreneurship and a Champion of Change by the White House and one of Fast Company's "100 Most Creative People in Business." He was also named to the National Advisory Council for Innovation and Entrepreneurship of the Department of Commerce. A major documentary with an Oscar-winning director, Generation Startup,featuring Yang and Venture for America, was released in Fall 2016 and is available on Netflix and other streaming platforms. He is a graduate of Columbia Law, where he was an Editor of the Law Review, James Kent Scholar and winner of the Class of 1912 Prize, and Brown University where he graduated with degrees in Economics and Political Science.

Donna Brazile

Donna Brazile has been a political operative since the age of nine, when she worked to elect a City Council candidate in her home town of New Orleans who had promised to build a playground in her neighborhood. The candidate won, the swing set was installed, and a lifelong passion for political progress was ignited. Since then, Ms. Brazile worked on every presidential campaign from 1976 through 2000, culminating as Al Gore's campaign manager and becoming the first African-American ever to manage a presidential race. Apart from campaign work, she has been active at the highest levels of Democratic party leadership, previously serving as Vice Chair for Civic Engagement and Voter Participation at the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and chair of the DNC's Voting Rights Institute. Ms. Brazile has received frequent recognition for her work throughout her public life. In August 2009, O, The Oprah Magazine chose Ms. Brazile as one of its 20 "remarkable visionaries" for the magazine's first-ever O Power List. In addition, she was named among the 100 Most Powerful Women by Washingtonian magazine, Top 50 Women in America by Essence magazine, and received the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's highest award for political achievement.

Howard G. Buffett

Howard G. Buffett is the chairman and CEO of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. A farmer, businessman, elected official, photographer, and philanthropist, he has dedicated his life to finding solutions for some of the world's most serious and intractable problems, including hunger, conflict, wildlife trafficking and, increasingly, border security and public safety challenges. He has served as a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador Against Hunger, and he serves on the corporate boards of Coca-Cola Corp. and Berkshire Hathaway. He is a sworn volunteer auxiliary deputy for the Macon County, Illinois Sheriff's Office, and he is Cochise Co. Sheriff's Office Volunteer Deputy Commander in Arizona.

Michael Savage

On air for 20 years, MICHAEL SAVAGE has millions of listeners for his #1 streaming radio show. The Savage Nation is one of the top radio talk programs in America, broadcast on over 225 stations. A prolific New York Times bestselling author, Dr. Savage has been profiled inPlayboy and The New Yorker and he has been awarded the Freedom of Speech Award from Talkers magazine. He received his Ph.D. in epidemiology and nutrition sciences from the University of California at Berkeley.

Mike Duncan

Mike Duncan is one of the foremost history podcasters in the world. His award winning series The History of Rome chronologically narrated the entire history of the Roman Empire over 189 weekly episodes. Running from 2007-2012, The History of Rome has generated more than 56 million downloads and remains one of the most popular history podcasts on the internet.

Newt Gingrich

NEWT GINGRICH is a former Speaker of the House and 2012 presidential candidate. He is a Fox News contributor and author of 34 books, including 14 New York Times bestsellers. Newt and his wife, Callista, host and produce documentary films. Recent films include The First American and Nine Days That Changed the World.

Nomi Prins

Nomi Prins is a journalist, speaker, respected TV and radio commentator, and former Wall Street executive. The author of six books, including All the Presidents' Bankers, Other People's Money, and It Takes a Pillage, her writing has been featured in the New York Times, Fortune, Mother Jones, Guardian, and Nation, among others. She is a senior fellow at Demos, was a member of Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) Federal Reserve Reform Advisory Council, is listed as one of America's TopWonks, and is on the advisory board of the whistle-blowing organization ExposeFacts.

Peter Moskowitz

Peter Moskowitz is a freelance journalist who has written for the Guardian, New York Times, New Republic, Wired, Slate, Buzzfeed, and many others. A former staff writer at Al Jazeera America, he is a graduate of Hampshire College and the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. Moskowitz lives in New York City.

Quentin Letts

Quentin Letts is parliamentary sketch writer and theatre critic for the Daily Mail. A regular broadcaster on radio and television, he was formerly New York correspondent for The Times and gossip columnist for the Daily Telegraph. He recently presented Radio 4's series 'What's The Point Of?' He lists his recreations, in Who's Who as 'gossip' and 'character defenestration'.

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of dozens of books and the recipient of various awards, including the National Humanities Medal, Presented by the President of the United States in 2003.