Related to: 'If They Come For Us'

Corsair

Magical Negro

Morgan Parker
Authors:
Morgan Parker

From the breakout author of There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé comes a profound and deceptively funny exploration of Black American womanhood.'2019 justly belongs to Morgan Parker. Her poems shred me with their intelligence, dark humor and black-hearted vision. Parker is one of this generation's best minds' Danez Smith, winner of the Forward Prize 'A riveting testimony to everyday blackness . . . It is wry and atmospheric, an epic work of aural pleasures and personifications that demands to be read - both as an account of a private life and as searing political protest' TIME MagazineMagical Negro is an archive of Black everydayness, a catalogue of contemporary folk heroes, an ethnography of ancestral grief, and an inventory of figureheads, idioms and customs. These poems are both elegy and jive, joke and declaration, songs of congregation and self-conception. They connect themes of loneliness, displacement, grief, ancestral trauma and objectification, while exploring tropes and stereotypes of Black Americans. Focused primarily on depictions of Black womanhood alongside personal narratives, the collection tackles interior and exterior politics - of both the body and society, of both the individual and the collective experience.In Magical Negro, Morgan Parker creates a space of witness, of airing grievances, of pointing out patterns. In these poems are living documents, pleas, latent traumas, inside jokes and unspoken anxieties situated as firmly in the past as in the present - timeless Black melancholies and triumphs.

Da Capo Press

What Do We Know

Mary Oliver
Authors:
Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver's poetry is fine and deep it reads like a blessing," wrote Stanley Kunitz many years ago and recently, Rita Dove described her last volume, The Leaf and the Cloud, as "a brilliant meditation." For the many admirers of Mary Oliver's dazzling poetry and luminous vision, as well as for those who may be coming to her work for the first time, What Do We Know will be a revelation. These forty poems-of observing, of searching, of pausing, of astonishment, of giving thanks-embrace in every sense the natural world, its unrepeatable moments and its ceaseless cycles. Mary Oliver evokes unforgettable images-from one hundred white-sided dolphins on a summer day to bees that have memorized every stalk and leaf in a field-even as she reminds us, after Emerson, that "the invisible and imponderable is the sole fact.

Andrew Sean Greer

Andrew Sean Greer is the bestselling author of five works of fiction, including The Confessions of Max Tivoli, which was named a best book of 2004 by the San Francisco Chronicle and the Chicago Tribune. He is the recipient of the Northern California Book Award, the California Book Award, the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, the O Henry award for short fiction and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Public Library. Greer lives in San Francisco. He has traveled to all of the locations in this novel, but he is only big in Italy.

Charlotte Betts

Charlotte Betts began her working life as a fashion designer in London. A career followed in interior design, property management and lettings.Always a bookworm, Charlotte discovered her passion for writing after her three children and two step-children had grown up. The Apothecary's Daughter is her debut novel and won the YouWriteOn Book of the Year in 2010, the Romantic Novelists' Association Joan Hessayon Award for New Writers in 2011 and the RoNA's Historical Category award for 2013. The sequel, The Painter's Apprentice was published in 2012 and shortlisted for the Festival of Romance's Best Historical Read Award in 2012. The Spice Merchant's Wife was published in 2013 and won the Festival of Romance's Best Historical Read Award in 2013.

Chimene Suleyman

Chimene Suleyman is a writer from London who is now based in New York. As well as contributing to The Good Immigrant she has written on race politics for The Independent, International Business Times, The Debrief, The Pool, Media Diversified. TV and radio appearances include BBC Newsnight, BBC, and LBC. Her poetry collection, Outside Looking On, was included in a Guardian's Best Book of 2014 list.

Christopher Matthew

Christopher Matthew is the author of Now We Are Sixty, When We Were Fifty, The Man Who Dropped the Le Creuset on his Toe and Dog Treats. He lives in London and Suffolk.

Emma Walton Hamilton

Emma Walton Hamilton is a bestselling children's book author, editor, arts educator, and theater professional, and author of Raising Bookworms: Getting Kids Reading for Pleasure and Empowerment. Together with her mother, Julie Andrews, she has coauthored many books for young readers, including the New York Times bestselling Very Fairy Princess series, the Dumpy the Dump Truck series, Simeon's Gift, The Great American Mousical, and the New York Times bestselling Julie Andrews' Collection of Poems, Songs, and Lullabies, a book for families to treasure and share.

Fatimah Asghar

Fatimah Asghar is the creator of the Emmy-nominated web series Brown Girls. She is a recipient of a 2017 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship. In 2017 she was listed on Forbes 30 Under 30 list.

Grace Paley

Born in the Bronx in 1922, Grace Paley was a renowned writer and activist. Her Collected Stories was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Her other collections include Enormous Changes at the Last Minute and Just As I Thought. She died in Vermont on August 22, 2007.

Julie Andrews

Julie Andrews is one of the most recognized figures in the world of entertainment, best known for her performances in The Sound of Music, Mary Poppins, and The Princess Diaries. Julie has been a celebrated children's book author for over thirty years, and her works include Mandy, The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles, and the Little Bo series. Her memoir, Home, was #1 on the New York Times bestseller list.

Katie Hickman

Katie Hickman is the author of eight books, including two bestselling works of non-fiction, Daughters of Britannia - in the Sunday Times bestseller lists for ten months and a twenty part series for BBC Radio 4 - and Courtesans. She has also written a trilogy of historical novels - The Aviary Gate, The Pindar Diamond and The House of Bishopgate - which have been translated into twenty languages. Her other books include two highly acclaimed travel books, including Travels with a Mexican Circus which was shortlisted for the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. Born into a diplomatic family, she had a peripatetic childhood, growing up in Spain, Ireland, Singapore and South America; she has two children and lives in London.

Mark Bryant

Mark Bryant has written/compiled a number of books on pets including It's a Dog's Life: A Canine Cartoon Collection (1991, Foreword by Jilly Cooper) - featuring the best of the entries for the Dog Cartoonist of the Year Awards - which was published to mark the centenary of the National Canine Defence League (now the Dogs Trust), with all royalties going to the charity. Other books include The Church Cat: Clerical Cats in Stories and Verse (1997); Cat Tales for Christmas (1993); The Artful Cat: A Tribute with 60 Portraits (1991); The World's Greatest Cat Cartoons (1993); The Complete Lexicat: A Cat Name Companion (1992); CATS: An Anthology of Stories and Poems (2016) and Casanova's Parrot and Other Tales of the Famous and Their Pets (2002). In addition, he is the author of Constable: A Brief History of Britain's Oldest Independent Publisher (2010) and other books. His family's much-loved canine companions have included a golden retriever and a short-haired terrier. He lives in London.

Mary Oliver

Born in a small town in Ohio, Oliver published her first book of poetry in 1963 at the age of twenty-three. Over the course of her long career, she received numerous awards. Her fourth book, American Primitive, won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1984. She led workshops and held residencies at various colleges and universities, including Hennington College, where she held the Catharine Osgood Foster Chair for Distinguished Teaching. Oliver died in January 2019.

Maya Angelou

Dr Maya Angelou was one of the world's most important writers and activists. Born 4 April 1928, she lived and chronicled an extraordinary life: rising from poverty, violence and racism, she became a renowned author, poet, playwright, civil rights' activist - working with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King - and memoirist. She wrote and performed a poem, 'On the Pulse of Morning', for President Clinton on his inauguration; she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama and was honoured by more than seventy universities throughout the world.She first thrilled the world with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This was followed by six volumes of autobiography, the seventh and final volume, Mom & Me & Mom, published in 2013. She wrote three collections of essays; many volumes of poetry, including His Day is Done, a tribute to Nelson Mandela; and two cookbooks. She had a lifetime appointment as Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University of North Carolina. Dr Angelou died on 28 May 2014.

Morgan Parker

Morgan Parker is the author of Other People's Comfort Keeps Me Up At Night, selected by Eileen Myles for the 2013 Gatewood Prize. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and anthologies, including Why I Am Not A Painter, The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop, and Best American Poetry 2016. Winner of a 2016 Pushcart Prize and a Cave Canem graduate fellow, Morgan lives in Brooklyn, New York. She works as an editor for Little A and Day One, moonlights as poetry editor of The Offing, and co-curates the Poets With Attitude (PWA) reading series with Tommy Pico. With poet and performer Angel Nafis, she is The Other Black Girl Collective.

Nikesh Shukla

Nikesh Shukla is the author of three novels. His latest, The One Who Wrote Destiny was published in 2018. His debut novel, Coconut Unlimited, was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award 2010. His second novel, Meatspace was released to critical acclaim in 2014. Nikesh has written for The Guardian, Observer, Independent, Esquire, Buzzfeed, Vice, BBC2, LitHub, Guernica and BBC Radio 4. Nikesh is also the editor the bestselling essay collection, The Good Immigrant which won the reader's choice at the Books Are My Bag Awards. Nikesh was one of Foreign Policy Magazine's 100 Global Thinkers and The Bookseller's 100 most influential people in publishing in 2016 and in 2017. He is the co-founder of the literary journal, The Good Journal and The Good Literary Agency

Roger Thurow

Roger Thurow is a senior fellow for global agriculture and food policy at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He was a reporter at the Wall Street Journal for 30 years. He is, with Scott Kilman, the author of Enough: Why the World's Poorest Starve in an Age of Plenty, which won the Harry Chapin WhyHunger award and was a finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and for the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award; and the author of The Last Hunger Season. He is a 2009 recipient of the Action Against Hunger Humanitarian Award. A long time Chicagoan, he now lives near Washington, DC.

Rumer Godden

Rumer Godden (1907-98) was the acclaimed author of over sixty works of fiction and non-fiction for adults and children. Born in England, she and her siblings grew up in Narayanganj, India, and she later spent many years living in Calcutta and Kashmir. Several of her novels were made into films, including Black Narcissus, The Greengage Summer and The River, which was filmed by Jean Renoir. She was appointed OBE in 1993.

Shobha Rao

Shobha Rao moved from India to the USA at the age of seven. She won the 2014 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction and is the recipient of the Elizabeth George Foundation fellowship. Her work has been published in numerous literary journals, including Tincture, PMS (poemmemoirstory), Nimrod and Water~Stone Review. She lives in San Francisco.

Tasha Suri

Tasha Suri was born in Harrow, North-West London. The daughter of Punjabi parents, she spent many childhood holidays exploring India with her family, and still fondly remembers the time she was chased around the Taj Mahal by an irate tour guide. She studied English and Creative Writing at Warwick University, and now lives in London where she works as a librarian. To no one's surprise, she owns a cat. A love of period Bollywood films, history and mythology led her to begin writing South Asian influenced fantasy.