Related to: 'How Much Brain Do We Really Need?'

Robinson

Growing Up Happy

Alexia Barrable, Jenny Barnett
Authors:
Alexia Barrable, Jenny Barnett

In Growing Up Happyneuroscientist Dr Jenny Barnett, and teacher and mum Alexia Barrable describe scientifically-proven methods by which children's happiness can be boosted in just a few minutes each day.With easy-to-use activities for toddlers through to teenagers, this book steers the reader through simple and practical ways, grounded in scientific research, to enhance children's - and adults' - day-to-day happiness. It includes? How practising mindfulness is possible even for your toddler? Why time outdoors helps your mental state, whatever the weather? How singing, smiling and stroking a cat all activate your 'bonding chemistry' ? Why fostering gratitude will make your teenager happierThis book will not tell you how to be a flawless parent, or how to raise perfect children, but it will give you proven and successful ways in which to make the days you spend with your kids more enjoyable, meaningful, and ultimately happier.

Brian Clegg

BRIAN CLEGG is a prize-winning science writer with a physics degree from Cambridge and a masters in the mathematical discipline operational research. He has written over 20 science books and articles for newspapers and magazines from The Observer and Wall Street Journal to BBC Focus and Playboy. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and two children.

Britannica

The Britannica Guide series offers an essential introduction to many of the key issues of our times. Clear, accurate, and meticulously researched the series gives both the background and analysis for when you need to know for sure what is really happening in the world, whether you are an expert, student or traveller.

Bruce Hood

Bruce Hood is currently the Director of the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre in the Experimental Psychology Department at the University of Bristol. He has been a research fellow at Cambridge University and University College London, a visiting scientist at MIT and a faculty professor at Harvard.

Chris Graham

Chris Graham is a 39 year-old former British Army soldier who was diagnosed with dementia five years ago. He has just completed a 16,000 mile cycle across North America.

John D. Preston

John Preston, PsyD, is a board certified psychologist and the author of ten books including Survivors, You Can Beat Depression, Integrative Brief Therapy, and Life is Hard (audio). He is on the faculty of Alliant University and the University of California, Davis, Medical School. He is the recipient of the Mental Health Association's President's Award for contributions to the mental health community. Dr. Preston has lectured widely in North America and abroad.

Jonathan Clements

Jonathan Clements is the author of many books on East Asian history, including biographies of Empress Wu, Admiral Togo, the statesman Prince Saionji and Coxinga, the Japanese-born 'pirate king'. He divides his time between London, England and Jyväskylä, Finland, and his website iswww.muramasaindustries.com.

Kate Bolick

Kate Bolick is a contributing editor to the Atlantic. She was previously the executive editor of Domino magazine. She lives in New York.

Ken MacLeod

Ken MacLeod graduated with a BSc from Glasgow University in 1976. Following research at Brunel University, he worked in a variety of manual and clerical jobs whilst completing an MPhil thesis. He previously worked as a computer analyst/programmer in Edinburgh, but is now a full-time writer. He is the author of twelve previous novels, five of which have been nominated for the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and two which have won the BSFA Award. Ken MacLeod is married with two grown-up children and lives in West Lothian.

Maryn McKenna

Maryn McKenna is an award-winning science and medical writer and author of Superbug and Beating Back the Devil: On the Front Lines with the Disease Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service (named one of the top ten science books of 2004 by Amazon). She currently works as a contributing writer for the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and is a media fellow at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. She is a graduate of Georgetown University and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and has also studied at Harvard Medical School. She lives in Minneapolis.

Matthew McKay

Matthew McKay, PhD, is a professor at the Wright Institute in Berkeley, CA. He has authored and coauthored numerous books, including The Relaxation and Stress Reduction Workbook, Self-Esteem, Thoughts and Feelings, When Anger Hurts, and ACT on Life Not on Anger. He has also penned two fiction novels, Us and The Wawona Hotel. McKay received his PhD in clinical psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology, and specializes in the cognitive behavioral treatment of anxiety and depression. He lives and works in the Bay Area.

Michael Shermer

Dr. Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and a Presidential Fellow at Chapman University where he teaches Skepticism 101. He is the author of New York Times bestsellers Why People Believe Weird Things and The Believing Brain, Why Darwin Matters, The Science of Good and Evil, and The Moral Arc. His next book is Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality & Utopia. Michael regularly contributes opinion editorials, essays, and reviews to: the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, Science, Nature, and other publications. He appeared on such shows as The Colbert Report, 20/20, Dateline, Charlie Rose, Oprah, and Larry King Live (but, proudly, never Jerry Springer!). He has been interviewed in countless documentaries aired on PBS, A&E, Discovery, The History Channel, The Science Channel, and The Learning Channel. Dr. Shermer was the co-host and co-producer of the 13-hour Family Channel television series, Exploring the Unknown. His two TED talks, seen by millions, were voted in the top 100.Dr. Shermer received his B.A. in psychology from Pepperdine University, M.A. in experimental psychology from California State University, Fullerton, and his Ph.D. in the history of science from Claremont Graduate University. He has been a college professor since 1979, also teaching at Occidental College, Glendale College, and Claremont Graduate University, where he taught a transdisciplinary course for Ph.D. students on Evolution, Economics, and the Brain.

Patricia Briggs

Patricia Briggs graduated from Montana State University with degrees in history and German. She worked for a while as a substitute teacher but now writes full-time. Patricia Briggs lives in the Pacific Northwest.

Paul Gilbert

Professor Paul Gilbert is the author of the bestselling Overcoming Depression and was previously Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Derby and Head of Specialty, Adult Mental Health for the Southern Derbyshire Mental Health Trust. He is currently based at the Mental Health Research Unit, Kingsway Hospital, Derby.

Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins is an evolutionary biologist renowned throughout the world. He was educated at Oxford and taught zoology before becoming the first holder of the Charles Simonyi Chair of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University, in 1995. His previous books rank among the most influential intellectual works of our time. They include THE SELFISH GENE (1976), RIVER OUT OF EDEN (1995), and UNWEAVING THE RAINBOW (1999).

Robert Crease

Robert Crease is a science writer and columnist for Physics World. His previous books include The Prism and Pendulum: The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments in Science. He has also written for The Atlantic, New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

Sandi Mann

Dr Sandi Mann is a Senior Psychology Lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire. She has researched extensively into boredom and written and presented her findings in a range of academic outlets. She's recognised as a leading authority on boredom and has appeared extensively in the media to talk about it, garnering front page headlines and full page reports. Sandi is an experienced workplace consultant, has her own private clinic and is the author of more than ten popular psychology books. Sandi blogs for the Huffington Post and is a columnist for Counselling At Work journal.

Stephen Joseph

Stephen Joseph is a professor of psychology, health and social care at the University of Nottingham, UK, where he is co-director of the Centre for Trauma, Resilience and Growth and an honorary consultant psychologist in psychotherapy. He has published more than two hundred academic papers, seven academic books and is the author of What Doesn't Kill Us (Piatkus). He is often asked to comment in the media on topical events relating to his work.

Tom Winter

Tom has always made his living from words, first in publishing, and later in advertising and public relations. His debut novel, Lost & Found, was published in five languages. He lives in Berlin, with a potted plant and a variety of noisy neighbours.

Wendy Holden

Wendy Holden was a journalist for eighteen years, including a decade at the Daily Telegraph where she worked as a foreign and war correspondent.She is author and the co-author of more than thirty books, including several bestselling wartime biographies, including the international bestseller Born Survivors, Tomorrow to be Brave, Til the Sun Grows Cold, and Behind Enemy Lines.She lives in Suffolk, with her husband and dog and divides her time between the U.K. and the U.S.