Related to: 'Patronising Bastards'

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The Speaker's Wife

Quentin Letts
Authors:
Quentin Letts

Winner of The People's Book Prize Beryl Bainbridge Award for Best First Time Author.'This brilliant and utterly engrossing debut novel is both a lively political satire and a state-of-the-nation polemic . . . The author's Wodehousian relish of the English language is infectious' Tatler'Wildly original and beautifully written. It's funny but, at times, unbearably sad' Daily MailThe Rev Tom Ross's quiet and semi-alcoholic life as chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons is about to be shattered. Pastor Petroc Stone of a central London, evangelical church gives sanctuary to a young man being chased by the police for making an anti-Islamic protest. Politicians rage about the Church of England giving a safe haven to a dangerous criminal and Islamists surround the church building, furious at the boy's insult.Meanwhile, the charismatic, white-maned Don of Doubt, Augustus Dymock, and his secular campaign, the Thought Foundation, are pressuring the Church to sell hundreds of its under-used places of worship.As the stories twist and flow together, Ross finds himself caught up in a world of bribes, violence and political spin and, at high personal cost, he must confront his demons. The Speaker's Wife mixes Westminster intrigue with searching depictions of an England which has neglected its beliefs. Laugh-aloud satire is mixed with moving passages about the human condition and even a fairytale love story.

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Letts Rip!

Quentin Letts
Authors:
Quentin Letts
Constable

Bog-Standard Britain

Quentin Letts
Authors:
Quentin Letts

No one would attack equality, would they? Quentin Letts just might. Not the notion of equality itself but the way it has become an industry for lobbyists, class warriors and New Labour's ageing Trots.Egalitarianism is a mania for today's policymakers and the soupy-brained halfwits we contrive to elect to public office. Appalled by free thinking, these equality junkies want to crush all individualism in our nation of once indignant eccentrics.Equality has been defiled by the ethnic grievance gang, by the harpies of feminist orthodoxy, by those risk-averse jackboots of town-hall bureaucracy with their quotas and creeds. Fair damsel Liberty has been whored by the best practice brigade, by the proceduralists of multinational corporatism in their company ties, by the glottal-stopping, municipal bores who insist that everyone must have prizes and that no culture can be dominant.Tilters against convention are assailed for their 'inappropriate' behaviour. Supporters of grammar schools are 'snobs'. Social nuance, once a vital lure to self-improvement, is deemed 'unacceptable'.Twenty-first century Britain's political cadre is so paralysed by class paranoia that it stops us attaining the best in schools, manners, language, fashion, popular culture. Elitism is a dirty word. The BBC stamps out the Queen's English because it is not 'accessible'. Celebrity morons are cultural pin-ups. Thick rools, OK. The glottal-stopping oikishness of our urban streets can be linked to modern equality's refusal to deplore. The prattishness of Jonathan Ross arises from a mad insistence that vulgarity is valid.Still think equality is such a great thing? You might not after reading this urgent, exasperated, witheringly funny book.Praise for 50 People Who Buggered Up Britain:'[Quentin Letts] discharges his duty with flair and tracer precision...an angry book, beautifully written.' The Spectator

Constable

50 People Who Buggered Up Britain

Quentin Letts
Authors:
Quentin Letts

Which fifty people made Britain the wreck she is? From ludicrous propagandist Alastair Campbell to the Luftwaffe's allies, the modernist architects, it's time to name the guilty.Quentin Letts sharpens his nib and stabs them where they deserve it, from TV gardener Alan Titchmarsh, the dumbed-down buffoon who put the 'h' in Aspidistra, to the perpetrators of the 'Credit Crunch'. Margaret Thatcher ruptured our national unity. The creators of EastEnders trashed our brand over high tea. Thus, he argues, are the people who made our country the ugly, scheming, cheating, beer-ridden bum of the Western world. Here are the fools and knaves and vulgarians who ripped down our British glories and imposed the tawdry and the trite. In a half century we have gone from end-of-Empire to descent-into-Hell.

Al Cimino

Al Cimino is the author of a number of books, including The Manhattan Project, Drug Wars and The Mafia Files.

Alexander Parker

Alexander Parker has authored a number of books with Tim Richman, and written for publications in the UK, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

Andrew Farago

Andrew Farago is the curator of the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco and author of the Harvey Award-winning Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History.

Andrew Marttila

Andrew Marttila is a professional animal photographer best known for his captivating images of felines. He reaches hundreds of thousands of cat lovers through social media where he documents his travels promoting shelters across the country, taking photos for clients, and snuggling his cat, Haroun. Andrew's photography has been featured in Catster, Vanity Fair, Real Simple, and The Guardian, and on CNN and MSNBC, among others. Andrew is the photographer behind Shop Cats of New York http://thegreatwentphoto.comAndrew is 'friends with and [has] photographed nearly all the "famous" internet cats.' He dates Hannah Shaw, known to the internet as 'Kitten Lady', whose life purpose has been dedicated to rescuing, fostering, and advocating for kittens. Kitten Lady has an extremely powerful social media presence; every week Andrew personally generates over 700,000 unique impressions to his social media images.

Anna Fleiss

Anna Fleiss is a digital media specialist living in LA. She has a BA in Visual Media Studies from Emerson College, and has been nominated for an Emmy award for her reality television work.

Charles M. Schulz

Charles Monroe Schulz (1922 -2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. He was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, to Dena and Carl Schulz. His nickname "Sparky" was given by his uncle, after the horse Spark Plug in the Barney Google comic strip. He attended St. Paul's Richard Gordon Elementary School, where he skipped two half-grades. As a result, he was the youngest in his class when he attended St. Paul Central High years later, which may have been the reason why he was so shy and isolated as a young teenager. After his mother died in February, 1943, he was drafted into the army and sent to Camp Campbell in Kentucky. He was then shipped to Europe two years later to fight in World War II. After leaving the United States Army in 1945, he took a job as an art teacher at Art Instruction Inc., which he attended before he was drafted. First published by Robert Ripley in his Ripley's Believe It or Not!, then in a series of chronicles, The Saturday Evening Post, his first regular comic strip, Li'l Folks was published in 1947 by the St. Paul Pioneer Press. (It was in this strip that Charlie Brown first appeared, as well as a dog that looked much like Snoopy). In 1950 he approached the United Features Syndicate with his best strips from Li'l Folks, and Peanuts made its first appearance on October 2, 1950. This strip became one of the most popular comic strips of all time. He also had a short-lived sports-oriented comic strip called It's Only a Game (1957-1959), but abandoned that strip due to the demands of the success of Peanuts.

Christopher Matthew

Christopher Matthew is the author of Now We Are Sixty, When We Were Fifty, The Man Who Dropped the Le Creuset on his Toe and Dog Treats. He lives in London and Suffolk.

Claire North

Claire North is a pseudonym for Catherine Webb, a Carnegie Medal-nominated author whose debut novel was written when she was just fourteen years old. She is fast establishing herself as one of the most powerful and imaginative voices in modern fiction. Her first book published under the Claire North pen name was The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, which became a word-of-mouth bestseller and was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. The follow-up Touch received widespread critical acclaim and was described by the Independent as 'little short of a masterpiece'. Her next novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope won the 2017 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, and her recent book The End of the Day has been shortlisted for the 2017 Sunday Times/PFD Young Writer of the Year Award. She lives in London.

Doree Shafrir

Doree Shafrir is a senior culture writer at BuzzFeed News and has written for New York Magazine, Slate, The Awl, Rolling Stone, Wired and other publications. A former resident of Brooklyn, she now lives in Los Angeles with her husband Matt Mira, a comedy writer and podcaster, and their dog Beau.

Edward Luce

Edward Luce is a graduate from Oxford University in Politics, Philosophy and Economics. He worked as a speech writer for the treasury secretary in the Clinton administration, worked as the South Asia bureau chief for the Financial Times and is based in Washington DC as the Financial Times Washington columnist and commentator.

George Courtauld

Farmer, ex-business man and a Queen's Messenger for the last fourteen years, George Courtauld is a keen amateur of botany, history and the arts in general. He divides his time between his farm in Essex and the rest of the world.

Harry Brett

Harry Brett is a pseudonym for Henry Sutton, who is the author of nine previous novels including My Criminal World and Get Me Out Of Here. He also co-authored the DS Jack Frost novel, First Frost, under the pseudonym James Henry. His work has been translated into many languages. His fifth novel, Kids' Stuff, received an Arts Council Writers' Award in 2002, and became a long-running stage play in Riga, Latvia.He has judged numerous literary prizes, including the John Lewellyn Rhys Prize and the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. He has been the Literary Editor of Esquire magazine and the Books Editor of the Daily Mirror. He teaches Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he is a Senior Lecturer and the director of the new Creative Writing MA Crime Fiction. He lives in Norwich with his family.

Lauren Graham

Lauren Graham is the actress best known for her roles on the critically-acclaimed series "Gilmore Girls" and "Parenthood." She has performed on Broadway and appeared in such films as Bad Santa, Evan Almighty, and Because I Said So. She is also the author of the New York Times bestselling novel SOMEDAY, SOMEDAY, MAYBE, which Ballantine Books published in 2013. Her essay collection TALKING AS FAST AS I CAN: FROM GILMORE GIRLS TO GILMORE GIRLS (AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN) was published in 2016 and was also a New York Times bestseller. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Barnard College and an MFA in acting from Southern Methodist University.

Lauren Mancuso

Lauren Mancuso is a writer, editor, and researcher living in Philadelphia. She has a Master's in Bioethics and a BS in Cognitive Science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Liz Climo

Liz Climo grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and moved to Los Angeles after college to work as a character artist on The Simpsons. She started a comic blog, LizClimo.tumblr.com, where Rory and his dad first appeared in 2012. Liz currently lives in Los Angeles with her husband, Colin, and their daughter, Marlow.

Mark Billingham

Mark Billingham has twice won the Theakston's Old Peculier Award for Crime Novel of the Year, and has also won a Sherlock Award for the Best Detective created by a British writer. Each of the novels featuring Detective Inspector Tom Thorne has been a Sunday Times bestseller. Sleepyhead and Scaredy Cat were made into a hit TV series on Sky 1 starring David Morrissey as Thorne, and a series based on the novels In the Dark and Time of Death was broadcast on BBC1. Mark lives in north London with his wife and two children.