Related to: 'Superhuman'

Little, Brown Young Readers US

The Super Awful Superheroes of Classroom 13

Honest Lee, Matthew J. Gilbert, Joelle Dreidemy
Contributors:
Honest Lee, Matthew J. Gilbert, Joelle Dreidemy

For fans of Captain Underpants or Sideways Stories from Wayside School, this new chapter book series is perfect for reluctant readers.When the 13th Classroom is struck by purple lightning, something strange happens--all of the students get SUPERPOWERS!You might think this was superb, but it was not. (It was sorta silly.) With great gifts comes wild weather, giant roaches, atomic farts, and other tricky troubles. As the students of Classroom 13 are about to learn, getting superpowers is not always super.If YOU could have a superpower, what would it be? The final chapter of each book encourages young readers to write their OWN chapter and send it in to the author, Honest Lee!The Super Awful Superheroes of Classroom 13is the fourth title in a new chapter book series of hilarious stories about a very unlucky classroom. Each story is full of humor, action, and fun that will prompt hours of conversation among friends, families, and classrooms.

PublicAffairs

Science Left Behind

Alex Berezow, Hank Campbell
Authors:
Alex Berezow, Hank Campbell

To listen to most pundits and political writers, evolution, stem cells, and climate change are the only scientific issues worth mentioning,and the only people who are anti-science are conservatives. Yet those on the left have numerous fallacies of their own. Aversion to clean energy programs, basic biological research, and even life-saving vaccines come naturally to many progressives. These are positions supported by little more than junk-science and paranoid thinking.Now for the first time, science writers Dr. Alex B. Berezow and Hank Campbell have drawn open the curtain on the left's fear of science. As Science Left Behind reveals, vague inclinations about the wholesomeness of all things natural, the unhealthiness of the unnatural, and many other seductive fallacies have led to an epidemic of misinformation. The results: public health crises, damaging and misguided policies, and worst of all, a new culture war over basic scientific facts,in which the left is just as culpable as the right.

Basic Books

How We Do It

Robert Martin
Authors:
Robert Martin

Despite the widespread belief that natural is better when it comes to sex, pregnancy, and parenting, most of us have no idea what natural" really means the origins of our reproductive lives remain a mystery. Why are a quarter of a billion sperm cells needed to fertilize one egg? Are women really fertile for only a few days each month? How long should babies be breast-fed?In How We Do It , primatologist Robert Martin draws on forty years of research to locate the roots of everything from our sex cells to the way we care for newborns. He examines the procreative history of humans as well as that of our primate kin to reveal what's really natural when it comes to making and raising babies, and distinguish which behaviours we ought to continue,and which we should not. Although it's not realistic to raise our children like our ancestors did, Martin's investigation reveals surprising consequences of,and suggests ways to improve upon,the way we do things now. For instance, he explains why choosing a midwife rather than an obstetrician may have a greater impact than we think on our birthing experience, examines the advantages of breast-feeding for both mothers and babies, and suggests why babies may be ready for toilet training far earlier than is commonly practiced. How We Do It offers much-needed context for our reproductive and child-rearing practices, and shows that once we understand our evolutionary past, we can consider what worked, what didn't, and what it all means for the future of our species.

PublicAffairs

Memoirs of an Addicted Brain

Marc Lewis
Authors:
Marc Lewis
Basic Books

Mean Genes

Jay Phelan, Terry Burnham
Authors:
Jay Phelan, Terry Burnham
Basic Books

The Annotated Flatland

Ian Stewart
Authors:
Ian Stewart

Flatland is a unique, delightful satire that has charmed readers for over a century. Published in 1884 by the English clergyman and headmaster Edwin A. Abbott, it is the fanciful tale of A. Square, a two-dimensional being who is whisked away by a mysterious visitor to The Land of Three Dimensions, an experience that forever alters his worldview. Like the original, Ian Stewart's commentary takes readers on a strange and wonderful journey. With clarity and wit, Stewart illuminates Abbott's numerous Victorian references and touches on such diverse topics as ancient Babylon, Karl Marx, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein , Mt. Everest, H.G. Wells, and phrenology. The Annotated Flatland makes fascinating connections between Flatland and Abbott's era, resulting in a classic to rival Abbott's own, and a book that will inspire and delight curious readers for generations to come.

Basic Books

The Millennium Problems

Keith Devlin
Authors:
Keith Devlin
Basic Books

Chaos In The Cosmos

Barry Parker
Authors:
Barry Parker
Basic Books

Traces Of The Past

Joseph B. Lambert
Authors:
Joseph B. Lambert

Where Stonehenge's giant bluestones come from? Was the fall of the Roman Empire hastened by lead poisoning? How did amber get from the Baltic to Belize? In exploring these and other historical enigmas, Joseph Lambert expertly details the rich insights into ancient life that chemistry alone can provide.Using cutting-edge scientific methods such as radiocarbon dating, DNA analysis, and elemental fingerprinting, acclaimed chemist Joseph Lambert expertly details the rich insights into ancient life that chemistry alone can provide. He shows, for example, how investigators today can determine the diet of prehistoric Europeans, the geographical origin of the marble in a Greek statue, or the reason why the Liberty Bell cracked. He uses nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to reconstruct ancient trade routes, and X-ray diffraction, among other methods, to compare the colour palettes of the Mesopotamians and Egyptians (the latter were apparently much more flamboyant). He explains how chemical analysis of DNA can be used to sort out human lineages and migratory patterns,demographic trends that affected, in turn, everything from language to the spread of disease.Chemistry takes centre stage in this fascinating book, proving that it is not just an analyst of culture, it stands as one of its primary creators. Lambert offers us a unique glimpse into a form of technical progress hitherto unappreciated: the ever-increasing ingenuity of the Human race, as seen through the prism of its evolving chemical sophistication. We discover how primitive chemistry was initially used by ancient people as a tool to improve their daily lives, a feat that was achieved by reworking molecules of clay into pottery and minerals into metal alloys, and by turning grains into beer and pitch into sealants.By documenting the way ancient people manipulated their environment chemically, Lambert further refines the distinguishing feature of our species. Early humans were more than tool-makers. They were molecular transformers.

Basic Books

The Heat Is On

Ross Gelbspan
Authors:
Ross Gelbspan
Basic Books

Hidden Order

John Holland
Authors:
John Holland

Explains how scientists who study complexity are convinced that certain constant processes are at work in all kinds of unrelated complex systems.

Basic Books

Fear Of Physics

Lawrence M. Krauss
Authors:
Lawrence M. Krauss

Brian Cox

Brian Cox is a distinguished particle physicist and popular TV host who divides his time between Manchester, England, and Geneva, Switzerland.

Gary Klein

Gary Klein, PhD, is a research psychologist famous for his part in founding the field of naturalistic decision making, and is Senior Scientist at MacroCognition LLC. He was one of the leaders of a team that redesigned the White House Situation Room. Gary is the author of several books, including The Power of Intuition and Streetlights and Shadows.

Honest Lee

Honest Lee is a liar! You can't trust a thing he writes. He insists that his stories are true. And they're totally not! Then again, I could be Honest Lee, which would mean I'm lying and my stories are true. What's the truth? I have no idea. Honestly.

Jeff Forshaw

Jeff Forshaw is a professor at the University of Manchester and a recipient of the Institute of Physics Maxwell Medal. He lives in Manchester, England.

Joelle Dreidemy

Joelle Dreidemy spent her childhood in the countryside among cows and books, and has been drawing since she learned to walk. She lives in France, where she makes art for books, magazines, greeting cards, and more. When she's not illustrating, she sings and plays guitar in a rock band.

Matthew J. Gilbert

Matthew J. Gilbert is one of many Matthew Gilberts. Seriously. There's like a trillion of them. This particular Matthew Gilbert writes stories and has a nearly perfect mustache. When he's not writing about Classroom 13, he's watching monster movies, eating tacos, and singing made-up songs about his cats.

Mick Dawson

MICK DAWSON is one of the most experienced and successful ocean rowers in the world. To date, he has spent over 440 days at sea in rowing boats, covering a distance of over 18,000 nautical miles. He is a former Royal Marines commando, who saw active service both in the Falklands War and the Middle East. His lifelong passion for the ocean continued after his time in the Royal Marines when he went on to become a professional sailor and ultimately record-breaking ocean rower. He is currently working with veterans on maritime projects to assist with their recovery from PTSD and combat injuries.

Rowan Hooper

Rowan Hooper is Managing Editor of New Scientist magazine, where he has spent more than ten years writing about all aspects of science. He has a PhD in evolutionary biology, and worked as a biologist in Japan for five years, before joining the Japan Times newspaper in Tokyo, and later taking up a fellowship at Trinity College Dublin. Two collections of his long-running column for the paper have been published in Japan, and his work has also appeared in The Economist, Guardian, Wired and the Washington Post. He lives in London with his partner and two daughters. @rowhoop