Related to: 'GuRu'

AN EXTRACT

THE JULIETTE SOCIETY

In her debut novel, Sasha Grey takes us inside a private, high-profile, sex society where anything and everything can happen. Read the prologue.

Alex Clarke

Alex Clarke is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist at the Royal Free Hospital, London.

Cath Staincliffe

Cath Staincliffe is an award winning novelist, radio playwright and creator of ITV's hit series Blue Murder. Cath's books have been shortlisted for the CWA Best First Novel award. She was joint winner of the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2012. Letters To My Daughter's Killer was selected for the Specsavers Crime Thriller Book Club on ITV3 in 2014. Cath also writes the Scott & Bailey books based on the popular ITV series. She lives with her family in Manchester.

Cathy Creswell

CATHY CRESWELL is a professor of developmental clinical psychology based in the school of psychology and clinical language sciences at the University of Reading and an honorary consultant clinical psychologist and joint director of the University of Reading Anxiety and Depression in Young People (AnDY) clinical research unit.

Charles M. Schulz

Charles Monroe Schulz (1922 -2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. He was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, to Dena and Carl Schulz. His nickname "Sparky" was given by his uncle, after the horse Spark Plug in the Barney Google comic strip. He attended St. Paul's Richard Gordon Elementary School, where he skipped two half-grades. As a result, he was the youngest in his class when he attended St. Paul Central High years later, which may have been the reason why he was so shy and isolated as a young teenager. After his mother died in February, 1943, he was drafted into the army and sent to Camp Campbell in Kentucky. He was then shipped to Europe two years later to fight in World War II. After leaving the United States Army in 1945, he took a job as an art teacher at Art Instruction Inc., which he attended before he was drafted. First published by Robert Ripley in his Ripley's Believe It or Not!, then in a series of chronicles, The Saturday Evening Post, his first regular comic strip, Li'l Folks was published in 1947 by the St. Paul Pioneer Press. (It was in this strip that Charlie Brown first appeared, as well as a dog that looked much like Snoopy). In 1950 he approached the United Features Syndicate with his best strips from Li'l Folks, and Peanuts made its first appearance on October 2, 1950. This strip became one of the most popular comic strips of all time. He also had a short-lived sports-oriented comic strip called It's Only a Game (1957-1959), but abandoned that strip due to the demands of the success of Peanuts.

Charles Stross

Charles Stross is a full-time science fiction writer and resident of Edinburgh, Scotland. The author of seven Hugo-nominated novels and winner of three Hugo awards for best novella, two of which are part of the Laundry Files series, Stross's works have been translated into over twelve languages. As the owner of degrees in pharmacy and computer science, he graduated as the world's only academically qualified cyberpunk writer just as cyberpunk died. Today he describes his job as telling lies for money and tormenting his imaginary friends. Follow his blog at http://www.accelerando.org/ and his Twitter feed at @cstross.

Clare Mackintosh

With over 2 million copies of her books sold worldwide, number one Sunday Times bestseller Clare Mackintosh is the multi-award-winning author of I Let You Go, I See You and Let Me Lie. Clare's novels have been translated into over thirty-five languages and I Let You Go and I See You were selected for the Richard and Judy Book club. Clare is patron of the Silver Star Society, a charity based at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford, which supports parents experiencing high-risk or difficult pregnancies. She lives in North Wales with her husband and their three children. For more information visit Clare's website www.claremackintosh.com or find her at www.facebook.com/ClareMackWrites or on Twitter @ClareMackint0sh

David Sedaris

With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, David Sedaris has become one of America's pre-eminent humor writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that Sedaris is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today. David Sedaris is the author of Barrel Fever and Holidays on Ice, as well as collections of personal essays, Naked, Me Talk Pretty One Day, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, When You Are Engulfed in Flames and his most recent book, Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, each of which became an immediate bestseller. The audio version of Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls was a Grammy nominee for Best Spoken Word Album. He is the author of the New York Times-bestselling collection of fables entitled Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Wicked Bestiary (with illustrations by Ian Falconer). He was also the editor of Children Playing Before a Statue of Hercules: An Anthology of Outstanding Stories. Sedaris's pieces appear regularly in the New Yorker and have twice been included in 'The Best American Essays'. There are a total of ten million copies of his books in print and they have been translated into twenty-nine languages.

Frances Cole

Dr Frances Cole was a GP and pain rehabilitation specialist. She developed the first UK primary and community care pain rehabilitation programme based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles in 1996. She developed a pain health needs assessment tool that won an NHS Modernisation award in 2005 and gained an NHS National Clinical Leaders Award in 2011. Frances is a past chair of the British Pain Society Pain Management Programme Special Interest Group whose current focus is on multidisciplinary pain management. Her current work is on digital self-management tools for pain including apps.

Gengoroh Tagame

Gengoroh Tagame was born in 1964 and lives in Tokyo. After graduating from Tama University of Art, Tagame worked as an art director while writing manga and prose fiction, contributing illustrations for various magazines. In 1994 he co-founded the epochal G-Men Magazine and by 1996 he was working full-time as an openly gay artist. He is the author of dozens of graphic novels and stories which have been translated into English, French, Italian and Korean. His artwork has been exhibited in galleries across Europe and America. My Brother's Husband marks his first all-ages title, and earned him the Japan Media Arts Award for Outstanding Work of Manga from the Agency of Cultural Affairs.

Helen Kennerley

Dr Helen Kennerley works as a consultant at the highly regarded Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre. In 2002 she was shortlisted by the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies for the award of most influential female cognitive therapist in Britain. She is the author of Overcoming Anxiety, Overcoming Childhood Trauma and How to Beat Your Fears and Worries.

J. R. Ward

After graduating from law school J.R. Ward began working in health care in Boston and spent many years as chief of staff for one of the premier academic medical centres in the US. She lives in Kentucky with her husband.

John Waters

John Waters is an American filmmaker, actor, writer and visual artist best known for his cult films, including Hairspray, Pink Flamingos and Cecil B. DeMented. He is also the author of a memoir, Role Models. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

Keren David

Keren David is a journalist and YA star who has been shortlisted for The Bookseller's YA Book Prize, the UKLA award and the Branford Boase Award, and nominated five times for the Carnegie Prize. Keren David started out in journalism as a teenage messenger, she trained as a reporter, and then later worked for many national papers before moving to Amsterdam with her family where she studied art history, learned to cycle and failed to learn Dutch. In 2007 she returned to London, and took a creative writing evening class at City University. Her first book, the award-winning When I Was Joe started out as a plot-planning exercise on the course. Keren is Features Editor for a national newspaper, and a Visiting Lecturer at City University. She is working on a musical adaptation of her book Lia's Guide to Winning the Lottery. Cuckoo is Keren's seventh book.

Lauren Graham

Lauren Graham is the actress best known for her roles on the critically-acclaimed series "Gilmore Girls" and "Parenthood." She has performed on Broadway and appeared in such films as Bad Santa, Evan Almighty, and Because I Said So. She is also the author of the New York Times bestselling novel SOMEDAY, SOMEDAY, MAYBE, which Ballantine Books published in 2013. Her essay collection TALKING AS FAST AS I CAN: FROM GILMORE GIRLS TO GILMORE GIRLS (AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN) was published in 2016 and was also a New York Times bestseller. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Barnard College and an MFA in acting from Southern Methodist University.

Lucy Willetts

LUCY WILLETTS is a clinical psychologist and accredited CBT therapist. She is also a visiting fellow at the University of Reading. She has a particular interest in the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and young people and has published a number of research papers and several books.

Maeve Marsden

MAEVE MARSDEN is a writer, director, producer and performer. Her writing has appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald, Guardian Australia, Junkee, SBS Online, ArtsHub and Daily Review, and she recently edited the ABC's Sydney Mardi Gras 40th Anniversary Magazine. Maeve produces, directs and performs in comedy, cabaret, live music and storytelling, enjoying critically acclaimed seasons at Sydney Festival, the Sydney Opera House, Adelaide Cabaret Festival, Melbourne International Comedy Festival and Edinburgh Festival Fringe, among others. As a child of same-sex parents, Maeve is passionate about the rights of diverse families, and she writes and speaks on the issue often, appearing in ABC2 documentary Growing Up Gayby and consulting on feature documentary, Gayby Baby. Maeve likes gin, dancing, cheese and TV melodramas with good ethics and bad dialogue.

Melanie Fennell

Melanie Fennell is one of the pioneers of cognitive therapy for depression in the UK and developed the Oxford Diploma in Cognitive Therapy and Oxford/MSc in Advanced Cognitive Therapy. She is a research clinician in the Oxford Mindfulness Centre and teaches on the Masters Degree in MBCT in Oxford University.

Michael Gradisar

MICHAEL GRADISAR is a clinical psychologist and professor in clinical child psychology at Flinders University, Australia. He is also the director of the Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, where he has helped hundreds of school-aged children (and their parents) to sleep better through the night.

Niviaq Korneliussen

Niviaq Korneliussen was born in 1990 in Nuuk and grew up in South Greenland. She studied Psychology at Aarhus University in Denmark and spent a year in California as an exchange student. Korneliussen started writing in 2013 and is the winner of many writing competitions in Greenland where her debut novel, Crimson, was first published under the title HOMO sapienne (2014). She translated it herself from Greenlandic to Danish. She is currently working on her second novel.

Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved to New York when she was six, where she attended the Julia Richman High School and Barnard College. In her senior year she edited the college magazine, having decided at the age of sixteen to become a writer. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, was made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. The Talented Mr Ripley, published in 1955, introduced the fascinating anti-hero Tom Ripley, and was made into an Oscar-winning film in 1999 by Anthony Minghella. Graham Greene called Patricia Highsmith 'the poet of apprehension', saying that she 'created a world of her own - a world claustrophobic and irrational which we enter each time with a sense of personal danger' and The Times named her no.1 in their list of the greatest ever crime writers. Patricia Highsmith died in Locarno, Switzerland, in February 1995. Her last novel, Small g: A Summer Idyll, was published posthumously, the same year.