Related to: 'The Suitcase Baby'

Alex Gray

Alex Gray was born and educated in Glasgow. After studying English and Philosophy at the University of Strathclyde, she worked as a visiting officer for the DHSS, a time she looks upon as postgraduate education since it proved a rich source of character studies. She then trained as a secondary school teacher of English. Alex began writing professionally in 1993 and had immediate success with short stories, articles and commissions for BBC radio programmes. She has been awarded the Scottish Association of Writers' Constable and Pitlochry trophies for her crime writing. A regular on the Scottish bestseller lists, her previous novels include Five Ways to Kill a Man, Glasgow Kiss, Pitch Black, The Riverman, Never Somewhere Else, The Swedish Girl and Keep the Midnight Out. She is the co-founder of the international Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, which had its inaugural year in 2012.

Alexander McCall Smith

Alexander McCall Smith is the author of over eighty books on a wide array of subjects, including the award-winning The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency series. He is also the author of the Isabel Dalhousie novels and the world's longest-running serial novel, 44 Scotland Street. His books have been translated into forty-six languages. Alexander McCall Smith is Professor Emeritus of Medical Law at the University of Edinburgh and holds honorary doctorates from thirteen universities.

Christopher Hibbert

Christopher Hibbert (1924-2008) was born in Leicestershire and educated at Radley and Oriel Colleges, Oxford. He served as infantry officer during the war, was twice wounded and was awarded the Military Cross in 1945. Described by Professor J. H. Plumb as 'a writer of the highest ability', he was, in the words of the Times Educational Supplement, 'perhaps the most gifted popular historian' of his day. Christopher Hibbert was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and an Hon. D. Litt of Leicester University.

Dale Lucas

Dale Lucas is a novelist, screenwriter and film critic from St Petersburg, Florida.

Gilly Macmillan

Gilly Macmillan is the New York Times bestselling author of What She Knew and The Perfect Girl. She trained as an art historian and worked at The Burlington Magazine and the Hayward Gallery before starting a family. Since then she's worked as a lecturer in photography, and now writes full-time. She resides in Bristol, England.

Jacob Ross

Jacob Ross was born in Grenada and now lives in Britain. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, he is the author of two acclaimed collections of short stories, A Way to Catch the Dust and Song for Simone and Tell No-One About This - nominated by The 2018 Bocas Literary Festival as one of the three best works of Caribbean fiction published in 2017. His first novel, Pynter Bender, was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Regional Prize, and his debut crime novel, The Bone Readers won the inaugural Jhalak Prize.

James Morton

James Morton is the author of the hugely successful Gangland series. He has long experience as a solicitor specialising in criminal work and was editor-in-chief of NEW LAW JOURNAL for many years.

Jon E. Lewis

Jon E. Lewis is a historian and writer, whose books on history and military historyare sold worldwide. He is also editor of many The Mammoth Book of anthologies, including the bestselling On the Edge and Endurance and Adventure.He holds graduate and postgraduate degrees in history. His work has appeared in New Statesman, the Independent, Time Out and the Guardian. He lives in Herefordshire with his partner and children.Praise for his previous books:England: The Autobiography:'A triumph' Saul David, author of Victoria's ArmyThe British Soldier: The Autobiography:'this thoughtful compilation . . . almost unbearably moving.' Guardian'Compelling tommy's eye view of war.' Daily Telegraph'What a book. Five stars.' Daily Express

Kate Ellis

Kate Ellis was born and brought up in Liverpool and studied drama in Manchester. She is the author of the Wesley Peterson murder mysteries as well as the Joe Plantagenet mysteries and the Albert Lincoln Trilogy set in the aftermath of the Great War.She has twice been shortlisted for the CWA Short Story Dagger and for the CWA Dagger in the Library award.Visit Kate online at: www.kateellis.co.uk

Katie Hickman

Katie Hickman is the author of eight books, including two bestselling works of non-fiction, Daughters of Britannia - in the Sunday Times bestseller lists for ten months and a twenty part series for BBC Radio 4 - and Courtesans. She has also written a trilogy of historical novels - The Aviary Gate, The Pindar Diamond and The House of Bishopgate - which have been translated into twenty languages. Her other books include two highly acclaimed travel books, including Travels with a Mexican Circus which was shortlisted for the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. Born into a diplomatic family, she had a peripatetic childhood, growing up in Spain, Ireland, Singapore and South America; she has two children and lives in London.

M.C. Beaton

M.C. Beaton is the author of both the Agatha Raisin and Hamish Macbeth series, as well as numerous Regency romances. Her Agatha Raisin books are currently being turned into a TV series on Sky. She lives in Paris and in a Cotswold village that is very much like Agatha's beloved Carsely.

Marjorie Eccles

Marjorie Eccles is the author of the contemporary series of Gil Mayo novels, and now writes crime novels set in the first half of the twentieth century. Her short stories have been broadcast, printed in magazines and included in anthologies. She is a past winner of the Malice Domestic Agatha short story award.

Mark Billingham

Mark Billingham has twice won the Theakston's Old Peculier Award for Crime Novel of the Year, and has also won a Sherlock Award for the Best Detective created by a British writer. Each of the novels featuring Detective Inspector Tom Thorne has been a Sunday Times bestseller. Sleepyhead and Scaredy Cat were made into a hit TV series on Sky 1 starring David Morrissey as Thorne, and a series based on the novels In the Dark and Time of Death was broadcast on BBC1. Mark lives in north London with his wife and two children.

Mark Greaney

Mark Greaney is the bestselling author of four Gray Man titles, and also co-author of three books with Tom Clancy. A feature film adaptation of The Gray Man is in development by New Regency Pictures. Mark has a degree in International Relations and Political Science. To research his novels, Mark has travelled all over the world and trained with firearms, visited the Pentagon and multiple Washington, D.C. Intelligence agencies, and studied close quarters battle tactics and battlefield medicine. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee.

Martin Edwards

Martin Edwards is the author of eighteen novels, the most recent of which is The Dungeon House. His other publications include The Golden Age of Murder, a ground-breaking study of detective fiction which won the Edgar and Agatha awards in 2016; he has also won a CWA Dagger and the CWA Margery Allingham Prize. He is series consultant for the British Library's Crime Classics, and in 2015, he was elected eighth President of the Detection Club, an office previously held by G.K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie, and Dorothy L. Sayers.

Michael Adams

Michael Adams is an author, journalist, TV producer and screenwriter with a broad and deep knowledge of film. His memoir SHOWGIRLS, TEEN WOLVES AND ASTRO ZOMBIES is about a year-long search for the worst movie ever made. His book SHINING LIGHTS is a profile of Australian Oscar winners, based on interviews with Cate Blanchett, Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe and Geoffrey Rush. Michael also contributed to THE 100 GREATEST FILMS OF AUSTRALIAN CINEMA, edited the AFI yearbook, and hosted Showtime's MOVIE CLUB and SBS's THE MOVIE SHOW. For a decade Michael was reviews editor of the Australian edition of EMPIRE and has written extensively on film and pop culture for MEN'S STYLE, YEN, ROLLING STONE, Rottentomatoes.com and Movieline.com. He most recently worked as a writer and researcher for a TV show about Australian inventors for the History Channel.

Peter Lovesey

Peter Lovesey was born in Middlesex and studied at Hampton Grammar School and Reading University, where he met his wife Jax. He won a competition with his first crime fiction novel, Wobble to Death, and has never looked back, with his numerous books winning and being shortlisted for nearly all the prizes in the international crime writing world. He was Chairman of the Crime Writers' Association and has been presented with Lifetime Achievement awards both in the UK and the US.

Sean Longden

Sean Longden studied history at University. He has conducted hundreds of interviews with servicemen. He is also the author of the acclaimed To the Victor the Spoils and Hitler's British Slaves.

Stephen Booth

Stephen Booth is the internationally bestselling, CWA Dagger-winning author of the acclaimed thrillers featuring Cooper and Fry. The series is in development as a TV programme. Booth lives in Nottingham.

Tom Holland

Tom Holland is the author of Rubicon, which was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and won the Hessell-Tiltman Prize for History 2004; Persian Fire, which won the Anglo-Hellenic League's Runciman Award 2006; and the highly acclaimed Dynasty, Millennium and In the Shadow of the Sword. He has adapted Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides and Virgil for BBC Radio.