Related to: 'Punishment Without Crime'

Abacus

Locking Up Our Own

James Forman, Jr.
Authors:
James Forman, Jr.
Hachette Books

Keep Marching

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner
Authors:
Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner

In the months since Donald Trump's shocking presidential upset, a movement has been coalescing in America-and when millions of women descended upon Washington, DC in January 2017 (and six hundred sister marches all across the country and the world), it was a wake-up call and the largest single-day demonstration in the history of the United States. But the truth is, women's rights didn't start or end there. There's a lot more to do. In Keep Marching, CEO of MomsRising.org and one of the contributing authors of the Unity Principles Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner examines societal, institutional, and political barriers that women historically and currently face and what you can do to dismantle them. Filled with inspiring stories from women on the front lines, along with revealing facts and insights on key issues to arm you with the intel you need to debate anyone from a male chauvinist boss to a policymaker, Keep Marching is a groundbreaking, definitive work that will help move our country forward. With each chapter focusing on different issues, from gender and racial discriminating laws, mass incarceration, family economic security, glass ceilings, violence against women, reproductive rights and more; Rowe-Finkbeiner offers practical tips and to-do lists on organizing and effecting change in our own communities, advances policy solutions that will lift everyone, and shares high impact strategies that anyone can use to keep marching online and on the ground (and why it matters so much).This book is a roadmap for a continued movement toward equality. More and more people realize that democracy isn't about one election, one Oval Office, one march, or one day-but it is instead about making democracy a regular practice in our everyday lives. Keep Marching calls for a continued path to change-and it will be lifted by the platform of action and engagement of MomsRising.org, which has an audience of over a million women.100% of the proceeds of the book will be donated to MomsRising.

Basic Books

Insane

Alisa Roth
Authors:
Alisa Roth
Nation Books

There Are No Dead Here

Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno
Authors:
Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno
Back Bay

Power Wars

Charlie Savage
Authors:
Charlie Savage
Basic Books

Locked In

John Pfaff
Authors:
John Pfaff

A groundbreaking examination of our system of imprisonment, revealing the true causes of mass incarceration as well as the best path to reformIn the 1970s, the United States had an incarceration rate comparable to those of other liberal democracies-and that rate had held steady for over 100 years. Yet today, though the US is home to only about 5 percent of the world's population, we hold nearly one quarter of its prisoners. Mass incarceration is now widely considered one of the biggest social and political crises of our age. How did we get to this point?Locked In is a revelatory investigation into the root causes of mass incarceration by one of the most exciting scholars in the country. Having spent fifteen years studying the data on imprisonment, John Pfaff takes apart the reigning consensus created by Michelle Alexander and other reformers, revealing that the most widely accepted explanations-the failed War on Drugs, draconian sentencing laws, an increasing reliance on private prisons-tell us much less than we think. Pfaff urges us to look at other factors instead, including a major shift in prosecutor behavior that occurred in the mid-1990s, when prosecutors began bringing felony charges against arrestees about twice as often as they had before. He describes a fractured criminal justice system, in which counties don't pay for the people they send to state prisons, and in which white suburbs set law and order agendas for more-heavily minority cities. And he shows that if we hope to significantly reduce prison populations, we have no choice but to think differently about how to deal with people convicted of violent crimes-and why some people are violent in the first place.An authoritative, clear-eyed account of a national catastrophe, Locked In transforms our understanding of what ails the American system of punishment and ultimately forces us to reconsider how we can build a more equitable and humane society.

Basic Books

The Constitution Today

Akhil Reed Amar
Authors:
Akhil Reed Amar
Basic Books

The Death and Life of the Great American School System

Diane Ravitch
Authors:
Diane Ravitch

A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America's best-known education experts.Diane Ravitch,former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum,examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today's most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril.Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America's schools:-leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmen-devise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learning -expect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schools-pay teachers a fair wage for their work, not merit pay" based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scores-encourage family involvement in education from an early age The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.

Robinson

The Ludicrous Laws of Old London

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

London abounds with all manner of ludicrous laws, and not all of these curious statutes have been relegated to the past. Despite the efforts of the Law Commission there are medieval laws that are still in force, and the City of London and its livery companies have their own legal oddities. Laws are made in the capital because parliament is here; so are the Old Bailey, the Law Courts, the House of Lords and, now, the Supreme Court. The privy council, which sometimes has to decide cases, also sits in London, and there were other courts that used to sit in London, from prize courts concerning war booty to ecclesiastical courts. Having maintained its 'ancient rights and freedoms' under Magna Carta, the City felt free to enact its own laws, many of which seem to have had to do with what people could wear. Until quite recently, for example, a man could be arrested for walking down the street wearing a wig, a robe and silk stockings - unless he was a judge. And all human folly has been paraded through the law courts of London, to the extent that it is difficult to know where the serious business of administering justice ends and where farce begins. As law is made in the courtroom as well as in parliament and elsewhere, judges like to keep a firm hand, but sometimes so-called jibbing juries will simply not do what they are told. All sorts of oddities get swept up into the law. Legislators particularly love to pass Acts about sex. If sexual services are being offered in a London massage parlour, for example, a police officer must then search the premises for school children. According to The Children and Young Persons Act of 1933 it is against the law for children and 'yowling persons' between the age of four and sixteen to frequent a brothel. A writ was introduced under both Edward III and Henry IV to ban lawyers from parliament as there were too many of them, the reason being that it was easier for a lawyer to spend his time in London attending parliament that it was for a knight of the shires. But because parliament was already packed with lawyers it was difficult to make any such rule stick. Then an effective way of excluding them was found. They were denied the wages paid to members in those days. Sadly, these days, parliament and the government are packed with lawyers once again. And they are being paid.A law passed in 1540 - and still in force today - makes it illegal for barbers in the City of London to practise surgery; with impeccable impartiality, the Act also forbids surgeons to cut hair. Finally, never forget that under the Vagrancy Act of 1824, you can be convicted of being 'an idle and disorderly person, or a rogue, vagabond, or incorrigible rogue'. The same act also outlaws people 'professing to tell fortunes', including 'palmistry'. Under the Act, it is an offence merely to be suspected.

Basic Books

It's Even Worse Than It Looks (Revised and Expanded Edition)

Norman J. Ornstein, Thomas E. Mann
Authors:
Norman J. Ornstein, Thomas E. Mann

Hyperpartisanship has gridlocked the American government. Congress's approval ratings are at record lows, and both Democrats and Republicans are disgusted by the government's inability to get anything done. In It's Even Worse than It Looks, Congressional scholars Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein present a grim picture of how party polarization and tribal politics have led Congress- and the United States- to the brink of institutional failure.In this revised edition, the authors bring their seminal book up-to-date in a political environment that is more divided than ever. The underlying dynamics of the situation- extremist Republicans holding government hostage to their own ideological, anti-government beliefs- have only gotten worse, further bolstering their argument that Republicans are not merely ideologically different from Democrats, but engaged in a unique form of politics that undermines the system itself. Without a fundamental change in the character and course of the Republican Party, we may have a long way to go before we hit rock bottom.

Nation Books

Inside the Cell

Erin E. Murphy
Authors:
Erin E. Murphy

Josiah Sutton was convicted of rape. He was five inches shorter and 65 pounds lighter than the suspect described by the victim, but at trial a lab analyst testified that his DNA was found at the crime scene. His case looked like many others,arrest, swab, match, conviction. But there was just one problem,Sutton was innocent.We think of DNA forensics as an infallible science that catches the bad guys and exonerates the innocent. But when the science goes rogue, it can lead to a gross miscarriage of justice. Erin Murphy exposes the dark side of forensic DNA testing: crime labs that receive little oversight and produce inconsistent results prosecutors who push to test smaller and poorer-quality samples, inviting error and bias law-enforcement officers who compile massive, unregulated, and racially skewed DNA databases and industry lobbyists who push policies of stop and spit."DNA testing is rightly seen as a transformative technological breakthrough, but we should be wary of placing such a powerful weapon in the hands of the same broken criminal justice system that has produced mass incarceration, privileged government interests over personal privacy, and all too often enforced the law in a biased or unjust manner. Inside the Cell exposes the truth about forensic DNA, and shows us what it will take to harness the power of genetic identification in service of accuracy and fairness.

Seal Press

Mary Jane

Cheri Sicard
Authors:
Cheri Sicard
Basic Books

America's Unwritten Constitution

Akhil Reed Amar
Authors:
Akhil Reed Amar

Despite its venerated place atop American law and politics, our written Constitution does not enumerate all of the rules and rights, principles and procedures that actually govern modern America. The document makes no explicit mention of cherished concepts like the separation of powers and the rule of law. On some issues, the plain meaning of the text misleads. For example, the text seems to say that the vice president presides over his own impeachment trial,but surely this cannot be right. As esteemed legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar explains in America's Unwritten Constitution , the solution to many constitutional puzzles lies not solely within the written document, but beyond it,in the vast trove of values, precedents, and practices that complement and complete the terse text.In this sequel to America's Constitution: A Biography , Amar takes readers on a tour of our nation's unwritten Constitution, showing how America's foundational document cannot be understood in textual isolation. Proper constitutional interpretation depends on a variety of factors, such as the precedents set by early presidents and Congresses common practices of modern American citizens venerable judicial decisions and particularly privileged sources of inspiration and guidance, including the Federalist papers, William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England , the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s I Have a Dream" speech. These diverse supplements are indispensible instruments for making sense of the written Constitution. When used correctly, these extra-textual aids support and enrich the written document without supplanting it.An authoritative work by one of America's preeminent legal scholars, America's Unwritten Constitution presents a bold new vision of the American constitutional system, showing how the complementary relationship between the Constitution's written and unwritten components is one of America's greatest and most enduring strengths.

Basic Books

Degrees of Inequality

Suzanne Mettler
Authors:
Suzanne Mettler

America's higher education system is failing its students. In the space of a generation, we have gone from being the best-educated society in the world to one surpassed by eleven other nations in college graduation rates. Higher education is evolving into a caste system with separate and unequal tiers that take in students from different socio-economic backgrounds and leave them more unequal than when they first enrolled. Until the 1970s, the United States had a proud history of promoting higher education for its citizens. The Morrill Act, the G.I. Bill and Pell Grants enabled Americans from across the income spectrum to attend college and the nation led the world in the percentage of young adults with baccalaureate degrees. Yet since 1980, progress has stalled. Young adults from low to middle income families are not much more likely to graduate from college than four decades ago. When less advantaged students do attend, they are largely sequestered into inferior and often profit-driven institutions, from which many emerge without degrees,and shouldering crushing levels of debt. In Degrees of Inequality , acclaimed political scientist Suzanne Mettler explains why the system has gone so horribly wrong and why the American Dream is increasingly out of reach for so many. In her eye-opening account, she illuminates how political partisanship has overshadowed America's commitment to equal access to higher education. As politicians capitulate to corporate interests, owners of for-profit colleges benefit, but for far too many students, higher education leaves them with little besides crippling student loan debt. Meanwhile, the nation's public universities have shifted the burden of rising costs onto students. In an era when a college degree is more linked than ever before to individual,and societal,well-being, these pressures conspire to make it increasingly difficult for students to stay in school long enough to graduate. By abandoning their commitment to students, politicians are imperiling our highest ideals as a nation. Degrees of Inequality offers an impassioned call to reform a higher education system that has come to exacerbate, rather than mitigate, socioeconomic inequality in America.

Grand Central Publishing

101 Things I Learned in Law School

Vibeke Norgaard Martin, Matthew Frederick
Authors:
Vibeke Norgaard Martin, Matthew Frederick
Hachette Books

Fighting for Common Ground

Olympia Snowe
Authors:
Olympia Snowe

An outspoken centrist, Senator Snowe stunned Washington in February 2012 when she announced she would not seek a fourth term and offered a sharp rebuke to the Senate, citing the dispiriting gridlock and polarization. After serving in the legislative branch at the state and federal levels for 40 years, including 18 years in the U.S. Senate, she explained that Washington wasn't solving the big problems anymore.In this timely call to action, she explores the roots of her belief in principled policy-making and bipartisan compromise. A leading moderate with a reputation for crossing the aisle, Senator Snowe will propose solutions for bridging the partisan divide in Washington, most notably through a citizens' movement to hold elected officials accountable. Senator Snowe recounts how the tragedies and triumphs of her personal story helped shape her political approach. Born in Augusta, Maine, Senator Snowe was orphaned at nine, and raised by an aunt and uncle. When she was twenty-six, her husband, a Maine state representative, was killed in an auto accident. Already dedicated to public service, she ran for and won her husband's seat.The book will include anecdotes from throughout her career, and address her working relationships with Presidents Reagan through Obama, Senator Ted Kennedy, Majority Leader Bob Dole, and many others. As a senior member of the powerful Senate Finance Committee, the high-profile Commerce and Intelligence Committees, and the Senate Small Business Committee, Senator Snowe has been directly involved with the most talked-about legislative challenges of recent decades: the country's response to 9/11 the 2008 financial crisis the Affordable Healthcare Act the debt ceiling debacle, and much more.Her new book will draw on the lessons she's learned as a policymaker, and the frustration she shares with the American people about the government's dwindling productivity. Senator Snowe passionately argues that the government has now lost its way, shows how this happened, and proposes ways for the world's greatest deliberative body to, once again, fulfill its mission.

PublicAffairs

The Child Catchers

Kathryn Joyce
Authors:
Kathryn Joyce

When Jessie Hawkins' adopted daughter told her she had another mom back in Ethiopia, Jessie didn't, at first, know what to think. She'd wanted her adoption to be great story about a child who needed a home and got one, and a family led by God to adopt. Instead, she felt like she'd done something wrong.Adoption has long been enmeshed in the politics of reproductive rights, pitched as a"win-win&rdquo compromise in the never-ending abortion debate. But as Kathryn Joyce makes clear in The Child Catchers , adoption has lately become even more entangled in the conservative Christian agenda.To tens of millions of evangelicals, adoption is a new front in the culture wars: a test of"pro-life&rdquo bona fides, a way for born again Christians to reinvent compassionate conservatism on the global stage, and a means to fulfill the"Great Commission&rdquo mandate to evangelize the nations. Influential leaders fervently promote a new"orphan theology,&rdquo urging followers to adopt en masse, with little thought for the families these"orphans&rdquo may already have.Conservative evangelicals control much of that industry through an infrastructure of adoption agencies, ministries, political lobbying groups, and publicly-supported"crisis pregnancy centres,&rdquo which convince women not just to"choose life,&rdquo but to choose adoption. Overseas, conservative Christians preside over a spiraling boom-bust adoption market in countries where people are poor and regulations weak, and where hefty adoption fees provide lots of incentive to increase the"supply&rdquo of adoptable children, recruiting"orphans&rdquo from intact but vulnerable families. The Child Catchers is a shocking exposé of what the adoption industry has become and how it got there, told through deep investigative reporting and the heartbreaking stories of individuals who became collateral damage in a market driven by profit and, now, pulpit command.Anyone who seeks to adopt- of whatever faith or no faith, and however well-meaning- is affected by the evangelical adoption movement, whether they know it or not. The movement has shaped the way we think about adoption, the language we use to discuss it, the places we seek to adopt from, and the policies and laws that govern the process. In The Child Catchers , Kathryn Joyce reveals with great sensitivity and empathy why, if we truly care for children, we need to see more clearly.

Rick Steves

The Practical Nomad

Edward Hasbrouck
Authors:
Edward Hasbrouck

The Practical Nomad provides a global perspective that's necessary whether you're a first-time trekker or an experienced explorer. Now more than ever it is important to understand other cultures, and Edward Hasbrouck's guide makes the ever-changing world more accessible. The fully updated fifth edition of The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World includes:Information on new airport security procedures, travel documents, entry requirements, and border crossings Tips on airline tickets and how to find the best deals without getting ripped off Advice on choosing destinations, routes, and traveling companionsHow to get the time and money for extended travel

Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful true crime and popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.

John Pfaff

John F. Pfaff is a Professor of Law at Fordham Law School. His work on mass incarceration, prosecutors, and criminal justice reform has been covered in The Economist, The New Yorker, the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, National Review, Slate, and Vox, among many others. He has a JD and a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.