Related to: 'The Retreat of Western Liberalism'

Little, Brown

Edge of Chaos

Dambisa Moyo
Authors:
Dambisa Moyo
Hachette Books

Hacks

Donna Brazile
Authors:
Donna Brazile

In the fallout of the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee, DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz was made to step down. To right the ship, the DNC turned to a legendary democratic hand: Donna Brazile. As chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee during the 2016 campaign, Brazile had a front-row seat to the wildest, craziest, and most disturbing presidential race in American history. She was called to take over a party riven by scandal and allegations of corruption, and then thrust into the international spotlight after the DNC email system was hacked by the Russians, a brazen and wholly unprecedented attempt by a foreign power to influence a presidential election. Seeking to balance the interest of a bitterly divided party while waging war against the Trump Republicans, Brazile was often a lonely warrior. Equal parts campaign thriller, political memoir, and vision for the future of the Democratic Party, Brazile's book will be the first to take readers inside the inner workings 2016 election from someone who saw calamity befall her party - and the nation - first hand. Among the book's many revelations:· THE REPLACEMENT. After Hillary Clinton shocking fainting episode at the 9/11 commemoration and her subsequent effort to downplay serious health issues, Brazile came up with a plan to replace her with a "dream team" ticket.· BERNIE PARANOIA WAS RIGHT. Bernie and his team were correct in their longstanding criticism of the DNC under Debbie Wasserman Schultz: the Clinton team had stacked the deck against them by staffing the DNC with Clinton loyalists.· DRAMA OBAMA. Brazile was constantly stunned by the President's and his team's unwillingness to go all-in for HRC. · CNN'S POLITICS-AS-ENTERTAINMENT WORLDVIEW. Inside the real story of Brazile's departure from CNN and Jeff Zucker's attempt to get her to lie in order to keep her job. INSIDE THE CAMPAIGN DEBACLE: Clinton had the votes, but not the strategy to win. Brazile will explain how we had a candidate with a ghost haunting her that could not be shaken: her history as a presidential loser.

Corsair

The Locals

Jonathan Dee
Authors:
Jonathan Dee

A rural, working class New England town elects as its mayor a New York hedge fund millionaire in this urgent and inspired novel for our times. Mark Firth is a home builder in Howland, Massachusetts who, after being swindled by a financial advisor, feels opportunity passing him and his family by. What future can he promise to his wife Karen and their young daughter Haley? When a wealthy money manager, Philip Hadi, moves to Howland to escape post-9/11 New York, he hires Mark to turn his his house into a secure location. The collision of these two men's very different worlds -- rural vs urban, middle class vs rich -- propels Jonathan Dee's powerful new novel. After the town's first selectman passes away suddenly, Hadi runs for office and begins subtly transforming the town in his image with unexpected results for Mark and his extended family. THE LOCALS is that rare work of fiction capable of capturing a fraught American moment in real time. It is also a novel that is timeless in its depiction of American small town life.

Little, Brown

Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy

Tim Harford
Authors:
Tim Harford
Little, Brown

Post-Truth

Evan Davis
Authors:
Evan Davis

Low-level dishonesty is rife everywhere, in the form of exaggeration, selective use of facts, economy with the truth, careful drafting - from Trump and the Brexit debate to companies that tell us 'your call is important to us'. How did we get to a place where bullshit is not just rife but apparently so effective that it's become the communications strategy of our times? This brilliantly insightful book steps inside the panoply of deception employed in all walks of life and assesses how it has come to this. It sets out the surprising logic which explains why bullshit is both pervasive and persistent. Why are company annual reports often nonsense? Why should you not trust estate agents? And above all, why has political campaigning become the art of stretching the truth? Drawing on behavioural science, economics, psychology and of course his knowledge of the media, Evan ends by providing readers with a tool-kit to handle the kinds of deceptions we encounter every day, and charts a route through the muddy waters of the post-truth age.

Basic Books

The Cause of All Nations

Don H. Doyle
Authors:
Don H. Doyle

When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in 1863, he had broader aims than simply rallying a war-weary nation. Lincoln realized that the Civil War had taken on a wider significance,that all of Europe and Latin America was watching to see whether the United States, a beleaguered model of democracy, would indeed perish from the earth."In The Cause of All Nations , distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explains that the Civil War was viewed abroad as part of a much larger struggle for democracy that spanned the Atlantic Ocean, and had begun with the American and French Revolutions. While battles raged at Bull Run, Antietam, and Gettysburg, a parallel contest took place abroad, both in the marbled courts of power and in the public square. Foreign observers held widely divergent views on the war,from radicals such as Karl Marx and Giuseppe Garibaldi who called on the North to fight for liberty and equality, to aristocratic monarchists, who hoped that the collapse of the Union would strike a death blow against democratic movements on both sides of the Atlantic. Nowhere were these monarchist dreams more ominous than in Mexico, where Napoleon III sought to implement his Grand Design for a Latin Catholic empire that would thwart the spread of Anglo-Saxon democracy and use the Confederacy as a buffer state.Hoping to capitalize on public sympathies abroad, both the Union and the Confederacy sent diplomats and special agents overseas: the South to seek recognition and support, and the North to keep European powers from interfering. Confederate agents appealed to those conservative elements who wanted the South to serve as a bulwark against radical egalitarianism. Lincoln and his Union agents overseas learned to appeal to many foreigners by embracing emancipation and casting the Union as the embattled defender of universal republican ideals, the last best hope of earth."A bold account of the international dimensions of America's defining conflict, The Cause of All Nations frames the Civil War as a pivotal moment in a global struggle that would decide the survival of democracy.

Abacus

The End of Alchemy

Mervyn King
Authors:
Mervyn King
Basic Books

The Limousine Liberal

Steve Fraser
Authors:
Steve Fraser

One of New York Times Book Review's 100 Notable Books of 2016No political image in recent American history has enjoyed the impact of the "limousine liberal." It has managed to mobilize an enduring politics of resentment directed against everything from civil rights to women's liberation, from the war on poverty to environmental regulation. Coined in 1969 by New York City mayoralty candidate Mario Procaccino, the term took aim at what he and his largely white lower middle class and blue collar following considered the repellent hypocrisy of well-heeled types who championed the cause of the poor, especially the black poor, but who had no intention of bearing the costs of their plight. The metaphor zeroed in on liberal elites who preferred to upset rather than defend the status quo not only in race relations, but in the sexual, moral, and religious order and had little interest in looking after the needs of working people.In The Limousine Liberal , the acclaimed historian Steve Fraser argues that it is impossible to understand American politics without coming to grips with this image, where it originated, why it persists, and where it may be taking us. He reveals that the limousine liberal had existed in all but name long before Procaccino gave it one. From Henry Ford decrying an improbable alliance of Jews, bankers, and Bolsheviks in the 1920s to the Tea Party's vehement hatred of Hillary Clinton, the fear of the limousine liberal has stoked right-wing populism for nearly a century. Today it fuses together disparate elements of the conservative movement. Sunbelt entrepreneurs on the rise, blue collar ethnics and middle classes in decline, heartland evangelicals, and billionaire business dynasts have found common cause, despite their real differences, in shared opposition to liberal elites. The Limousine Liberal tells an extraordinary story of why the most privileged and powerful elements of American society were indicted as subversives and reveals the reality that undergirds that myth. It goes to the heart of the great political transformation of the postwar era: the rise of the conservative right and the unmaking of the liberal consensus.

PublicAffairs

A Chinaman's Chance

Eric Liu
Authors:
Eric Liu

From Tony Hsieh to Amy Chua to Jeremy Lin, Chinese Americans are now arriving at the highest levels of American business, civic life, and culture. But what makes this story of immigrant ascent unique is that Chinese Americans are emerging at just the same moment when China has emerged - and indeed may displace America - at the centre of the global scene. What does it mean to be Chinese American in this moment? And how does exploring that question alter our notions of just what an American is and will be?In many ways, Chinese Americans today are exemplars of the American Dream: during a crowded century and a half, this community has gone from indentured servitude, second-class status and outright exclusion to economic and social integration and achievement. But this narrative obscures too much: the Chinese Americans still left behind, the erosion of the American Dream in general, the emergence- perhaps- of a Chinese Dream, and how other Americans will look at their countrymen of Chinese descent if China and America ever become adversaries. As Chinese Americans reconcile competing beliefs about what constitutes success, virtue, power, and purpose, they hold a mirror up to their country in a time of deep flux.In searching, often personal essays that range from the meaning of Confucius to the role of Chinese Americans in shaping how we read the Constitution to why he hates the hyphen in "Chinese-American," Eric Liu pieces together a sense of the Chinese American identity in these auspicious years for both countries. He considers his own public career in American media and government his daughter's efforts to hold and release aspects of her Chinese inheritance and the still-recent history that made anyone Chinese in America seem foreign and disloyal until proven otherwise. Provocative, often playful but always thoughtful, Liu breaks down his vast subject into bite-sized chunks, along the way providing insights into universal matters: identity, nationalism, family, and more.

PublicAffairs

935 Lies

Charles Lewis
Authors:
Charles Lewis

Facts are and must be the coin of the realm in a democracy, for government "of the people, by the people and for the people," requires and assumes to some extent an informed citizenry. Unfortunately, for citizens in the United States and throughout the world, distinguishing between fact and fiction has always been a formidable challenge, often with real life and death consequences. But now it is more difficult and confusing than ever. The Internet Age makes comment indistinguishable from fact, and erodes authority. It is liberating but annihilating at the same time. For those wielding power, whether in the private or the public sector, the increasingly sophisticated control of information is regarded as utterly essential to achieving success. Internal information is severely limited, including calendars, memoranda, phone logs and emails. History is sculpted by its absence.Often those in power strictly control the flow of information, corroding and corrupting its content, of course, using newspapers, radio, television and other mass means of communication to carefully consolidate their authority and cover their crimes in a thick veneer of fervent racialism or nationalism. And always with the specter of some kind of imminent public threat, what Hannah Arendt called'objective enemies.'"An epiphanic, public comment about the Bush "war on terror" years was made by an unidentified White House official revealing how information is managed and how the news media and the public itself are regarded by those in power: "[You journalists live] "in what we call the reality-based community. [But] that's not the way the world really works anymore. We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality . . . we're history's actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do." And yet, as aggressive as the Republican Bush administration was in attempting to define reality, the subsequent, Democratic Obama administration may be more so. Into the battle for truth steps Charles Lewis, a pioneer of journalistic objectivity. His book looks at the various ways in which truth can be manipulated and distorted by governments, corporations, even lone individuals. He shows how truth is often distorted or diminished by delay: truth in time can save terrible erroneous choices. In part a history of communication in America, a cri de coeur for the principles and practice of objective reporting, and a journey into several notably labyrinths of deception, 935 Lies is a valorous search for honesty in an age of casual, sometimes malevolent distortion of the facts.

Abacus

Time To Start Thinking

Edward Luce
Authors:
Edward Luce
Abacus

Time To Start Thinking

Edward Luce
Authors:
Edward Luce

On its present course, the US faces a world of rising new countries that will compete with it ever more fiecely as its own power is declining. In order to slow and improve this steady leakage of power, the US must change course internationally, economically and domestically. It must also restructure to remain the world's most competitive economy. And it must address quality of life issues and fairness at home. But American politics is broken -- competing forces and interests have led to stasis. With change so tough, where now for a country where the middle classes are suffering as they have never suffered before, the pensions crisis is growing, the deficit out of sight, and radicalism waiting in the wings?

Nation Books

After Empire

Dilip Hiro
Authors:
Dilip Hiro

The United States' victory in the Cold War in 1991 led to triumphalist claims that humanity had reached the end of history," and that Washington would enjoy everlasting supremacy. Some years later, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright called America the indispensable nation." And a senior aide to President George W. Bush crowed: We are an empire now." But by invading Iraq, Bush irreparably undermined U.S. credibility worldwide. And by curtailing Americans' civil liberties in the name of waging an endless war on terror," and resorting to torture in the prisons of occupied Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantánamo Bay, his administration,as well as America,lost its claim to a moral high ground. Moreover, the 2008-2009 global fiscal meltdown, triggered by the sub-prime mortgage crisis on Wall Street, exposed a stark fact: The heavily indebted America had ceased to be the financial behemoth it had been since World War II. After Empire sketches the contours of a complex world system emerging during the late imperial phase of the U.S. It examines, critically, the events that prepared the ground for the world to move from the tutelage of the sole superpower, America, to a multipolar, post-imperial global order. Refreshingly, it does so from a distinctly non-Western perspective. Unlike other scholars, Dilip Hiro,one of the world's leading experts on the geopolitics of hydrocarbons as well as the Middle East and South and Central Asia,does not offer a comforting thesis that the U.S. is quite capable of accommodating the rising world powers like China, Russia, India, and the European Union while retaining its dominant position at the table. Neither does he frame global politics in a Manichean way,America versus China the West against Asia. The world, he suggests, is set to revisit the pre-World War I Europe, where rulers frequently changed allies and adversaries to achieve the shared aim of keeping the continent free of an overarching power,to date, a privilege enjoyed globally by America. With more than two trillion dollars in its foreign reserves, China's state-owned corporations are busily buying up companies worldwide. By surpassing Saudi Arabia in its oil output, Russia, the number one producer of natural gas, is now the world's foremost producer of hydrocarbons. Its nuclear arsenal is on par with America's. Elsewhere the hydrocarbon-rich nations of Venezuela and Iran are challenging the Washington-dominated status quo respectively in South America and the Middle East. Already, the 27-nation European Union of nearly 500 million has surpassed America as the globe's largest trading entity, and the euro has emerged as a strong rival to the U.S. dollar as a dominant reserve currency. After Empire is realistic and nuanced in its assessment of global politics. Shorn of an ideological bias or a soft corner for America, it abounds in unsettling and stimulating insights on politics, history, hard and soft power, political economy and democracy.

Abacus

In Spite Of The Gods

Edward Luce
Authors:
Edward Luce

India is poised to become one of the world's three largest economies in the next generation and to overtake China as the world's most populous country by 2032. Well before then India's incipient nuclear deterrent will have acquired intercontinental range and air, sea and land capabilities. India's volatile relationship with its nuclear-armed neighbour, Pakistan, may prove to be the source of the world's next major conflict. And if you call anyone- from your bank to rail enquiries- your query may well be dealt with by a graduate in Gujarat. Any way one looks at it, India's fate matters. Edward Luce, one of the most incisive and talented journalists of his generation, assesses the forces that are forging the new nation. Cutting through the miasma that still clouds thinking about India, this extraordinarily accomplished book takes the measure of a society that is struggling to come to grips with modernity. Drawing on historical research, existing literature and his own unparalleled access as the New Delhi-based, South Asia correspondent of the FT, this is a book that will enthral as well as educate and will remain the definitive book on the country for many years.

Little, Brown US

Takeover

Charlie Savage
Authors:
Charlie Savage
Basic Books

Economic Strategy And National Security

Patrick DeSouza
Authors:
Patrick DeSouza

1998 was filled with economic events that illustrated the changing and complex agenda for American foreign policy in entering the new millenium. In this volume, former senior members of the Clinton and Bush Administrations and a next generation" of private sector voices set forth and analyze the new intersections between economic strategy and national security. Emerging markets are considered, as well as, new threats and new opportunities that are changing our conception of American security.This book arises from a two-year project by the Council on Foreign Relations, one of the world's premier foreign policy think tanks, to articulate a Next Generation" approach to American foreign policy. The volume is intended for those interested in foreign policy and as a supplement to university-level courses on international relations and business.The financial, trade, technology and regional and sectoral topics covered by this book are especially timely. World financial markets have showed themselves to be increasingly integrated and volatile with the introduction of new information technologies. Global markets for goods have showed themselves to be more fragmented and more difficult to free because of populist concerns over labour and environmental protections. Meanwhile, electronic commerce will change international economic relations. Regionally, Asia and Russia - our post-Cold War focus - are in collapse. Latin America, our fastest growing market and prospective 21st century focus, is teetering due to the lack of foreign reserves.In addition to these changing dynamics, new economic threats such as corruption and information terrorism counter-balance new opportunities to influence the world through American know-how in technology and venture capital.As evidenced most clearly by the October 1998 vote on Fast Track trade authority for the President, domestic audiences seem to be fueled more by negative messages brought by economic nationalists" than those who seek a more internationalist" approach. This communications reality is dangerous and requires attention by the new generation of American leaders who will begin their run for the presidency by the time the book reaches the shelves.This book begins to outline new concepts - political, economic and philosophical - for American foreign policy in the 21st century. In addition, it seeks to drive home the need for the American people to better understand our likely engagement in the new world upon which we are embarking.

Edward Luce

Edward Luce is a graduate from Oxford University in Politics, Philosophy and Economics. He worked as a speech writer for the treasury secretary in the Clinton administration, worked as the South Asia bureau chief for the Financial Times and is based in Washington DC as the Financial Times Washington columnist and commentator.

Evan Davis

Evan Davis was born in 1962 in Surrey. He is the highly respected presenter of the BBC Radio 4 Today programme, as well as presenting BBC Two business reality show Dragons' Den.

Stephen Leeb

Stephen Leeb is the President of Leeb Capital Management. An academic prodigy and Ph.D. with degrees in Economics, Mathematics and Psychology from the Wharton School of Business and the University of Illinois, he has authored four previous books. His wife and longtime collaborator, Donna Leeb, has a diversified background in business and journalism.

Tim Harford

Tim Harford is a senior columnist for the Financial Times and the presenter of Radio 4's More or Less. He was the winner of the Bastiat Prize for economic journalism in 2006, and More or Less was commended for excellence in journalism by the Royal Statistical Society in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Harford lives in Oxford with his wife and three children, and is a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. His other books include The Undercover Economist, The Logic of Life and Adapt.