Related to: 'The Hunter of the Dark'

Abacus

The Girl in the Fog

Donato Carrisi
Authors:
Donato Carrisi

Sunday Times Crime Book Club PickMail on Sunday Thriller of the Week'A coldly brilliant exposé of the depths of human nature' SUNDAY TIMES'Compelling, beautifully constructed and atmospheric' DAILY MAIL Sixty-two days after the disappearance . . .A man is arrested in the small town of Avechot. His shirt is covered in blood. Could this have anything to do with a missing girl called Anna Lou?What really happened to the girl? Detective Vogel will do anything to solve the mystery surrounding Anna Lou's disappearance. When a media storm hits the quiet town, Vogel is sure that the suspect will be flushed out. Yet the clues are confusing, perhaps false, and following them may be a far cry from discovering the truth at the heart of a dark town. FOR FANS OF DONNA LEON AND MICHELE GIUTTARI, GET READY FOR THE CRIME THRILLER OF THE YEAR. 'Carrisi is an expert at misdirection . . . this is a thoroughly disconcerting, addictive thriller guaranteed to freeze your soul' METRO

Abacus

The Vanished Ones

Donato Carrisi
Authors:
Donato Carrisi

We call them the sleepers . . .At the elite Missing Persons bureau of the Federal Police, Mila Vasquez is tasked with finding the hundreds of lost people who vanished from their former lives. The longer they are gone, the more they are forgotten by the world.Now they are returning.Appearing at random and wielding devastation, they enact a horrifying pattern of murders, leaving Mila scrabbling to discover where they have come from and what they want. Yet the deeper into the case she gets, Mila begins to realise that her colleagues are hiding something from her - something which will jeopardise everything . . .Set in the world of Carrisi's record-breaking debut, The Whisperer, The Vanished Ones is intelligent, thrilling and incredibly compelling.

Abacus

The Lost Girls of Rome

Donato Carrisi
Authors:
Donato Carrisi

A young girl has mysteriously disappeared in Rome. As rain lashes the ancient streets, two men, Clemente and Marcus, sit in a café near the Piazza Navona and pore over the details of the case. They are members of the ancient Penitenzeri - a unique Italian team, linked to the Vatican, and trained in the detection of true evil.But they are not alone. Sandra - a brilliant forensics expert with a tragic past - is also working on the case. When her path crosses theirs, not only do they make headway in the case of the missing girl, but they also uncover a terrible secret world, hidden in the dark recesses of Rome. A world that is as perfect as it is evil...A spellbinding literary thriller from the author of The Whisperer, this novel offers a window onto the hidden secrets of Rome. Beautifully capturing the atmosphere of the city, it blends a page-turning plot with fascinating historical fact.

Abacus

The Whisperer

Donato Carrisi
Authors:
Donato Carrisi

Andrea Carter

Andrea Carter graduated in Law from Trinity College, Dublin. She qualified as a solicitor and moved to the Inishowen peninsula where she lived and worked for a number of years. In 2005 she transferred to the Bar and moved to Dublin to practise as a barrister. She grew up in Ballyfin, Co Laois.

Angela Marsons

Angela Marsons was born and raised in the Black Country and still lives there, along with her long-term partner, as well as a bouncy Labrador and a potty-mouthed African Grey parrot. Although she has been writing since her early teens, Silent Scream was her first novel.

Anna Seghers

ANNA SEGHERS (1900-1983) was born Netty Reiling in Mainz, Germany, into a Jewish family. In 1924 she received a doctorate in Art History from the University of Heidelberg, and in the same year her first story, written under the name Antje Seghers, was published. During this time, she came into contact with many left-wing intellectuals, including her husband, a Hungarian economist, and began writing in earnest. By the end of 1928, Anna Seghers had joined the Communist Party, given birth to two children and was awarded the Kleist Prize for her first novel, The Revolt of the Fishermen of St Barbara.As Jew, a Communist and a revolutionary writer, she was blacklisted in Nazi Germany and left for France in 1933 with her family. After the Nazi invasion in 1940, she was forced to flee again and, with the aid of Varian Fry, she and her family sailed from Marseilles to Mexico on a ship that included Victor Serge, André Breton and Claude Lévi-Strauss among its passengers.Seghers gained international recognition with The Seventh Cross (1942), which became a bestseller. It was the basis for the 1944 MGM film starring Spencer Tracy and was one of the only depictions of Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War in either literature or film. It has been translated into more than thirty languages.After the war Seghers moved to East Berlin, where she became a prominent figure of East German letters, actively championing the work of younger writers from her position as president of the Writers Union. Among Seghers' internationally acclaimed works are The Seventh Cross; Transit (1944); Excursion of the Dead Girls (1945); The Dead Stay Young (1949); and the story collection Benito's Blue (1973).

B. E. Jones

B.E. Jones is a former journalist and police press officer, now a novelist and book obsessive. She was born in a small village in the South Wales valleys, north of Cardiff and started her journalism career with Trinity Mirror newspapers before becoming a broadcast journalist with BBC Wales Today.She has worked on all aspects of crime reporting (as well as community news and features) producing stories and content for newspapers and live TV. Most recently she worked as a press officer for South Wales Police, dealing with the media and participating in criminal investigations, security operations and emergency planning. Perhaps unsurprisingly she channels these experiences of 'true crime,' and her insight into the murkier side of human nature, into her dark, psychological thrillers set in and around South Wales.

Cath Weeks

Cath Weeks was born and raised in Somerset. Her debut novel, Blind, was published in 2017 and she was named as an Author to Watch by Elle magazine. Cath lives in Bath with her husband and two sons.

Charlaine Harris

Charlaine Harris is a New York Times bestselling author who has been writing for over thirty-five years. Born and raised in the Mississippi Delta, she is the author of the Aurora Teagarden mysteries, basis for the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Aurora Teagarden original movies; the Midnight, Texas series, now airing on NBC; the Sookie Stackhouse urban fantasy series, basis for the HBO show True Blood; the Lily Bard mysteries; the Harper Connelly mysteries; and the co-author of the graphic novel trilogy Cemetery Girl. Harris now lives in Texas with her husband and two rescue dogs.

Clare Mackintosh

With over 2 million copies of her books sold worldwide, number one bestseller Clare Mackintosh is multi-award-winning author of I Let You Go, which was a Sunday Times bestseller and the fastest-selling title by a new crime writer in 2015. It also won the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year in 2016. Both Clare's second and third novels, I See You and Let Me Lie, were number one Sunday Times bestsellers. All three of her books were selected for the Richard & Judy Book Club, and together have been translated into over thirty-five languages.Clare is patron of the Silver Star Society, a charity based at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford, which supports parents experiencing high-risk or difficult pregnancies. She lives in North Wales with her husband and their three children. For more information visit Clare's website www.claremackin­tosh.com or find her at www.facebook.com/ClareMackWrites or on Twitter @ClareMackint0sh #ILetYouGo #ISeeYou #LetMeLie

Craig Russell

Craig Russell's novels have been published in twenty-five languages, four have been made into major films in Germany, in one of which he has a cameo role as a detective. He has won the CWA Dagger in the Library and the McIlvanney Prize (for which he has been shortlisted another twice), and has previously been shortlisted for the CWA Golden Dagger, the Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, and the SNCF Prix Polar in France. A former police officer, Craig Russell is the only non-German to have been awarded the Polizeistern - the Hamburg Police's Police Star.When not writing, Craig Russell paints, cooks and reads, but not simultaneously.

E. S. Thomson

E. S. Thomson's work has been longlisted for the CWA Endeavour Historical Dagger, and shortlisted for the Saltire Prize, the Scottish Arts Council First Book Award and the William McIlvanney Crime Book of the Year Award. She has a PhD in the social history of medicine, and tries to fit as much medical history into her books as possible. She works as a university lecturer by day, and writes by night. Elaine lives in Edinburgh with her two sons.

Elizabeth Chadwick

Much of Elizabeth Chadwick's research is carried out as a member of Regia Anglorum, an early mediaeval re-enactment society with emphasis on accurately re-creating the past. She also tutors in the skill of writing historial and romantic fiction. She won a Betty Trask Award for The Wild Hunt and has been shortlisted for the RNA Awards four times.

Garry Douglas Kilworth

Garry Douglas Kilworth was raised in South Yemen, the son of an RAF sergeant. He served fifteen years in the RAF himself, and was with the British Army in Hong Kong, where he wrote for the South China Morning Post. He now spends his time between Suffolk and Spain, writing full time, and has won many awards.

Hania Allen

Hania Allen was born in Liverpool, but has lived in Scotland longer than anywhere else, having come to love the people and the country (despite nine months of rain and three months of bad weather). Of Polish descent, her father was stationed in St Andrews during the war, and spoke so fondly of the town that she applied to study at the University.She has worked as a researcher, a mathematics teacher, an IT officer and finally in senior management, a post she left to write full time. She is the author of the Von Valenti novels and now lives in a fishing village in Fife.

Harry Brett

Harry Brett is a pseudonym for Henry Sutton, who is the author of nine previous novels including My Criminal World and Get Me Out Of Here. He also co-authored the DS Jack Frost novel, First Frost, under the pseudonym James Henry. His work has been translated into many languages. His fifth novel, Kids' Stuff, received an Arts Council Writers' Award in 2002, and became a long-running stage play in Riga, Latvia.He has judged numerous literary prizes, including the John Lewellyn Rhys Prize and the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. He has been the Literary Editor of Esquire magazine and the Books Editor of the Daily Mirror. He teaches Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he is a Senior Lecturer and the director of the new Creative Writing MA Crime Fiction. He lives in Norwich with his family.

Heather Child

Heather Child's experience in digital marketing has brought her into close contact with the automation and personalisation technologies that herald the 'big data' age. She lives in Bristol. Find her on twitter at @Heatherika1.

J. R. Ward

After graduating from law school J.R. Ward began working in health care in Boston and spent many years as chief of staff for one of the premier academic medical centres in the US. She lives in Kentucky with her husband.

Jacob Ross

Jacob Ross was born in Grenada and now lives in Britain. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, he is the author of two acclaimed collections of short stories, A Way to Catch the Dust and Song for Simone and Tell No-One About This - nominated by The 2018 Bocas Literary Festival as one of the three best works of Caribbean fiction published in 2017. His first novel, Pynter Bender, was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Regional Prize, and his debut crime novel, The Bone Readers won the inaugural Jhalak Prize.