Related to: 'Jack Tar'

Abacus

Gibraltar

Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins
Authors:
Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins

For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence. Located between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, on the very edge of Europe, Gibraltar was a place of varied nationalities, languages, religions and social classes. During the siege, thousands of soldiers, civilians and their families withstood terrifying bombardments, starvation and diseases. Very ordinary people lived through extraordinary events, from shipwrecks and naval battles to an attempted invasion of England and a daring sortie out of Gibraltar into Spain. Deadly innovations included red-hot shot, shrapnel shells and a barrage from immense floating batteries.This is military and social history at its best, a story of soldiers, sailors and civilians, with royalty and rank-and-file, workmen and engineers, priests, prisoners-of-war, spies and surgeons, all caught up in a struggle for a fortress located on little more than two square miles of awe-inspiring rock. Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History is an epic page-turner, rich in dramatic human detail - a tale of courage, endurance, intrigue, desperation, greed and humanity. The everyday experiences of all those involved are brought vividly to life with eyewitness accounts and expert research.

Abacus

Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England

Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins
Authors:
Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins

Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England explores the real England of Jane Austen's lifetime. It was a troubled period, with disturbing changes in industry and agriculture and a constant dread of invasion and revolution. The comfortable, tranquil country of her fiction is a complete contrast to the England in which she actually lived. From forced marriages and the sale of wives in marketplaces to boys and girls working down mines or as chimney sweeps, this enthralling social history reveals how our ancestors worked, played and struggled to survive. Taking in the horror of ghosts and witches, bull baiting, highwaymen and the stench of corpses swinging on roadside gibbets, this book is a must-read for anyone wanting to discover the genuine story of Jane Austen's England and the background to her novels.

Constable

The Handbook of British Archaeology

Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins, Victoria Leitch
Authors:
Lesley Adkins, Roy Adkins, Victoria Leitch

For over 25 years The Handbook of British Archaeology has been the foremost guide to archaeological methods, artefacts and monuments, providing clear explanations of all specialist terms used by archaeologists. This completely revised and updated edition is packed with the latest information and now includes the most recent developments in archaeological science. Meticulously researched, every section has been extensively updated by a team of experts. There are chapters devoted to each of the archaeological periods found in Britain, as well as two chapters on techniques and the nature of archaeological remains. All the common artefacts, types of sites and current theories and methods are covered. The growing interest in post-medieval and industrial archaeology is fully explored in a brand new section dealing with these crucial periods. Hundreds of new illustrations enable instant comparison and identification of objects and monuments - from Palaeolithic handaxes to post-medieval gravestones. Several maps pinpoint the key sites, and other features include an extensive bibliography and a detailed index. The Handbook of British Archaeology is the most comprehensive resource book available and is essential for anyone with an interest in the subject - from field archaeologists and academics to students, heritage professionals, Time Team followers and amateur enthusiasts.

Abacus

The War For All The Oceans

Roy Adkins, Lesley Adkins
Authors:
Roy Adkins, Lesley Adkins

As France emerged from revolution, a young general named Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt, hoping next to march overland to India. It would not happen. Britain swung her forces into action to battle for control of the world's sea-lanes and thus all international trade. The Battle of the Nile and then at Acre were the first sallies in what would be fifteen years of bitter fighting. It was a war won at sea, and by the time of Waterloo Britain had gained control and possessed the foundations of her vast empire.Brought vividly to life through the words and stories of the ordinary people caught up in the conflict, this is a sweeping history of the years of naval warfare that set the balance of power in Europe for the following century. Taking in gallant duels, bloody battles between huge fleets, amphibious assaults, daring coastal raids, and the subtleties of espionage and naval intelligence, this global conflict truly was THE WAR FOR ALL THE OCEANS.

Abacus

Trafalgar

Roy Adkins
Authors:
Roy Adkins

This is the true story of the Battle of Trafalgar, Britain's most significant sea battle, as seen through the smoke-hazed gunports of the fighting ships. In an atmosphere of choking fumes from cannon and musket fire, amid noise so intense it was almost tangible, the crews of the British, French and Spanish ships did their best to carry out their allotted tasks. For over five hours they were in constant danger from a terrifying array of iron and lead missiles fired from enemy guns, as well as the deadly wooden splinters smashed from the ships' hulls by the cannon-balls. While the men manoeuvred the ships and kept the cannons firing, the women helped the surgeons tend the sick or helped the boys - the 'powder monkeys' - in the hazardous job of carrying gunpowder cartridges from the central magazine to the gun decks. Trafalgar set the seal on British naval supremacy, which became the mainspring for the growth of the British Empire, and in the short term not only prevented Napoleon from invading Britain, but also enabled Britain and its Continental allies to mount the campaign that would eventually defeat the French Emperor: without Trafalgar there would be no Waterloo.

Asne Seierstad

Åsne Seierstad was born in 1970 and studied Russian, Spanish and the History of Philosophy at Oslo University. An internationally bestselling author, she has also received numerous awards for her journalism. She has worked as a war correspondent across the world, including Russia, China, Iraq and Afghanistan. Her second book, The Bookseller of Kabul, has sold over two million copies and the paperback was in the Sunday Times top ten for over a year. Her other critically acclaimed works include A Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal and The Angel of Grozny. Following the atrocities in Oslo and Utoya in July 2011, she attended the trial of Anders Breivik and then began work on One of Us, which became a European bestseller. All of Åsne Seierstad's books are published by Virago.

Brian Wallace

Brian Wallace served as a Massachusetts state representative from 2003 to 2011. He grew up in South Boston and as a child met Steve Ross when Ross was assigned to his school as a youth worker. He credits Ross with inspiring him to stay in school and pursue his dream of becoming a politician.

David Lammy

David Lammy was born in London to Guianese parents and has served as the MP for Tottenham since 2000. He was the first black Briton to study at Harvard Law School and before entering politics practised as a barrister. He served as a minister under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown and his first book, Out of the Ashes: Britain after the Riots, was published to widespread acclaim in 2011.

Desmond Seward

Desmond Seward was born in Paris and educated at St Catherine's College, Cambridge. He is the author of numerous studies and biographies.

Duncan White

Duncan White is a journalist and academic who combines his position as Lecturer in History and Literature at Harvard University with his role as a lead book reviewerand feature writer for the Telegraph. He is the author of Vladimir Nabokov: Late Modernism, the Cold War and the Literary Marketplace, editor of a collection ofessays on the life and work of Nabokov, and has established himself as a scholarly authority on mid-century American and Russian literature, with a particular focus on the Cold War. He moved to the United States in 2012 to join Wellesley College as a Newhouse Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer. At Wellesley he organised a lecture series on Cold War culture, featuring Pulitzer-winners Louis Menand and Anne Applebaum as guest speakers. Duncan is British and lives in Boston, Massachusetts.)

Glenn Frank

Glenn Frank is a Boston-based real-estate attorney and the author of Abe Gilman's Ending.

James Le Fanu

James Le Fanu has combined a career as a General Practitioner in South London with writing about medicine and science for the Sunday and Daily Telegraph. He has also contributed articles and reviews to The Times, Spectator, New Statesman, Literary Review, British Medical Journal and Journal of The Royal Society of Medicine. His much acclaimed 'The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine' won the Los Angeles Times book prize in 2001. His most recent book, 'Why Us?', was published jointly by HarperCollins in the UK and Random House in the US in 2009. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in 2014.

Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch's first novel, White Oleander, a #1 bestseller and Oprah's Book Club selection, has been translated into 24 languages and was made into a feature film. Her most recent novel, Paint It Black, hit bestseller lists across the country and has also been made into a film. She lives in Los Angeles.

Jason Webster

Jason Webster is a writer and columnist for the Spanish El Asombrario newspaper. He is the highly acclaimed author of a dozen books of fiction and non-fiction about Spain, which have been translated into over fifteen languages, including the international bestseller Duende, and Guerra. He is married to the Spanish flamenco dancer Salud.

Lesley Adkins

Roy and Lesley Adkins are husband-and-wife historians and authors of widely acclaimed books on naval and social history, including Jack Tar, Trafalgar, The War for All the Oceans and Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England, which have been translated into seventeen languages. They are Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London and the Royal Historical Society, as well as Members of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. They live in Devon. See www.adkinshistory.com

Mark Pendergrast

Mark Pendergrast was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and is the author of eleven books, including Uncommon Grounds and For God, Country and Coca-Cola. He lives in Vermont.

Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful true crime and popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.

Peter Phelps

Peter Phelps is one of Australia's best-loved actors, regularly appearing in film, television and theatre productions. He is an AFI and Logie award winner and has directed episodes of All Saints and Home and Away. In 1994 he wrote the bestselling book Sex without Madonna: True confessions of a hired gun in Tinseltown (a wry look at his years in Hollywood). His second book, The Bulldog Track, is a very personal account of his grandfather's incredible survival in New Guinea during WWII, and his escape by the 'other Kokoda trail'.

Robert Carmichael

ROBERT CARMICHAEL worked for a decade as a foreign correspondent in Cambodia, leaving in 2017. His first stint was from 2001-3 when he was the managing editor of the Phnom Penh Post, Cambodia's oldest English-language newspaper. His role not only required him to run the news-gathering and editorial side of the newspaper, but also to write extensively about pressing national issues. Among those was the 2003 deal between the United Nations and the Cambodian government that resulted in the formation of the Khmer Rouge tribunal. He returned in early 2009 to cover Duch's trial, the first of four cases the tribunal was tackling. During that time, he worked as the country correspondent for the German wire service dpa, as well as for Radio Australia, Voice of America radio, BBC radio and Deutsche Welle, among others. He wrote numerous wire, radio and print articles about the tribunal and Duch's trial in particular, as well as news and features on other topics including the economy, social issues, politics, human rights and the environment. His writing appeared regularly through these outlets and others in Europe, Australasia and the Americas.Through his work Robert developed excellent relationships with some of the leading lights at the tribunal as well as experts in related fields including academics David Chandler, Stephen Heder and Craig Etcheson, as well as Youk Chhang who runs the genocide research organization DC-Cam. He travelled widely around Cambodia interviewing people about the Khmer Rouge period, the impact of the tribunal and the thorny issue of reconciliation, which as a South African, was of particular personal interest.In 2012, he wrote the 21,000-word text for the iPad app Quest for Land, whose 700 images shot over a decade by Magnum photographer John Vink cover the topic of land in Cambodia. In his New York Times review, veteran correspondent Seth Mydans praised the 'intelligent and thorough written text by the Phnom Penh-based journalist Robert Carmichael that enhances the images with context and analysis . . . [and] places the issue of land and land-grabbing firmly within the history and soul of a country that continues to feel the wounds of mass killings by the Khmer Rouge.' For two years, Robert was the president of the Overseas Press Club of Cambodia, and in that capacity established strong links with leading journalists in the region. Robert's website www.robertcarmichael.net contains many of his articles.

Roxane Gay

Roxane Gay is the author of An Untamed State, Bad Feminist and the story collection Ayiti. Her work has also appeared in Glamour, Best American Short Stories, and the New York Times Book Review. She is the co-editor of PANK.