Related to: 'Tranny'

Abby Norman

Abby Norman is a science writer and editor. Her work has been featured in The Rumpus, The Independent, Paste Magazine, Medium, Atlas Obscura, Seventeen, Quartz, Cosmopolitan, and Lady Science/The New Inquiry. As a patient advocate and speaker, she has been on conference faculty at The Endometriosis Foundation of America, Stanford University's Medicine X conference, and received health literacy training through The Dartmouth Institute. She is currently an associate science editor at Futurism and the host of Let Me Google That on Anchor.fm. She lives on the coast of Maine with her dog, Whimsy.

Alexis Willett

Dr Alexis Willett is a science communicator who spends much of her time turning cutting-edge research and health policy jargon into something meaningful for patients, doctors, policy makers and the public. She is often called upon to help influence decision makers, from governments to funding bodies, across the UK and Europe. She has a PhD in biomedical science from the University of Cambridge and, since her partner is a psychiatrist, is used to having her daily conversations dominated by brain-related facts.

Barbara Cardy

BARBARA CARDY originally trained in art, design and construction, before moving through a variety of careers. To date, she has edited twenty-seven anthologies of various kinds. She lives in Kent with her two boys.

Barney Hoskyns

Barney Hoskyns is the co-founder and editorial director of online rock-journalism library Rock's Backpages (www.rocksbackpages.com), and author of several books including Across the Great Divide: The Band & America (1993), Waiting for the Sun: Strange Days, Weird Scenes, & the Sound of Los Angeles (1996), Hotel California: Singer-Songwriters & Cocaine Cowboys in the LA Canyons (2005) and Lowside of the Road: A Life of Tom Waits (2009). A former US correspondent for MOJO, Hoskyns writes for Uncut and other UK publications, and has contributed to Vogue, Rolling Stone and GQ.

Ben Fergusson

Ben Fergusson's debut novel The Spring of Kasper Meier, was selected for Waterstones Book Club, WH Smith Fresh Talent and the BBC Radio 2 Book Club. It was longlisted for the Authors' Club Best First Novel Award 2015 and shortlisted for The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award 2015. It won the 2015 Betty Trask Prize for an outstanding debut novel by a writer under 35 and the HWA Debut Crown 2015 for the best historical fiction debut of the year.

Claire North

Claire North is a pseudonym for Catherine Webb, a Carnegie Medal-nominated author whose debut novel was written when she was just fourteen years old. She is fast establishing herself as one of the most powerful and imaginative voices in modern fiction. Her first book published under the Claire North pen name was The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, which became a word-of-mouth bestseller and was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. The follow-up Touch received widespread critical acclaim and was described by the Independent as 'little short of a masterpiece'. Her next novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope won the 2017 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, and her recent book The End of the Day has been shortlisted for the 2017 Sunday Times/PFD Young Writer of the Year Award. In addition to working on her next novel 84K, Claire is also one of three writers contributing to the upcoming Black Mirror book, which ties into Charlie Brooker's award-winning TV series. In between writing, Claire also works as a theatre lighting designer. She lives in London.

Clarence Clemons

Deceased.

David Ritz

CO-AUTHOR: David Ritz co-wrote Tavis Smiley's previous bestseller, Death of a King, and has collaborated with Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, B.B. King, and more.

Gengoroh Tagame

Gengoroh Tagame was born in 1964 and lives in Tokyo. After graduating from Tama University of Art, Tagame worked as an art director while writing manga and prose fiction, contributing illustrations for various magazines. In 1994 he co-founded the epochal G-Men Magazine and by 1996 he was working full-time as an openly gay artist. He is the author of dozens of graphic novels and stories which have been translated into English, French, Italian and Korean. His artwork has been exhibited in galleries across Europe and America. My Brother's Husband marks his first all-ages title, and earned him the Japan Media Arts Award for Outstanding Work of Manga from the Agency of Cultural Affairs.

Jean-Michel Guesdon

Jean-Michel Guesdon, a musician, composer, and sound engineer, who wrote with Philippe Margotin All the Songs: The Story Behind Every Beatles Release and Bob Dylan All the Songs: The Story Behind Every Track. He lives in Paris.

Jeffrey Cranor

Jeffrey Cranor co-writes the hit podcast, novel and touring live show Welcome to Night Vale. He has also written more than one hundred short plays with the New York Neo-Futurists, co-wrote and co-performed a two-man show about time travel with Joseph, and collaborated with choreographer (also wife) Jillian Sweeney to create three full-length dance pieces. Jeffrey lives in New York State.

Jenny Barnett

Dr Jenny Barnett is a neuroscientist and psychologist interested in the genetic and environmental causes of brain health and mental illness. Having trained at Oxford, Cambridge and Harvard universities, Jenny has authored more than 50 scientific publications on topics ranging from new treatments for schizophrenia to the economic impact of dementia. She now works at the intersection of academic and industrial research, designing new technologies to help detect, diagnose and treat brain disorders. Her first book, Growing Up Happy, with Alexia Barrable, was published by Robinson in 2016.

Joanna Moorhead

Joanna Moorhead writes for the Guardian. Born in Lancashire, she now lives in London. The Surreal Life of Leonora Carrington is her first book.

Joseph Fink

Joseph Fink created and co-writes the Welcome to Night Vale podcast, novel and touring live show. In his mid-twenties he started Commonplace Books, producing two collections of short works which he edited at his office job when his boss wasn't looking. He is from California but doesn't live there anymore.

Keren David

Keren David is a journalist and YA star who has been shortlisted for The Bookseller's YA Book Prize, the UKLA award and the Branford Boase Award, and nominated five times for the Carnegie Prize. Keren David started out in journalism as a teenage messenger, she trained as a reporter, and then later worked for many national papers before moving to Amsterdam with her family where she studied art history, learned to cycle and failed to learn Dutch. In 2007 she returned to London, and took a creative writing evening class at City University. Her first book, the award-winning When I Was Joe started out as a plot-planning exercise on the course. Keren is Features Editor for a national newspaper, and a Visiting Lecturer at City University. She is working on a musical adaptation of her book Lia's Guide to Winning the Lottery. Cuckoo is Keren's seventh book.

Maya Angelou

Dr Maya Angelou was one of the world's most important writers and activists. Born 4 April 1928, she lived and chronicled an extraordinary life: rising from poverty, violence and racism, she became a renowned author, poet, playwright, civil rights' activist - working with Malcolm X and Martin Luther King - and memoirist. She wrote and performed a poem, 'On the Pulse of Morning', for President Clinton on his inauguration; she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama and was honoured by more than seventy universities throughout the world.She first thrilled the world with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969). This was followed by six volumes of autobiography, the seventh and final volume, Mom & Me & Mom, published in 2013. She wrote three collections of essays; many volumes of poetry, including His Day is Done, a tribute to Nelson Mandela; and two cookbooks. She had a lifetime appointment as Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University of North Carolina. Dr Angelou died on 28 May 2014.

Mitch Albom

Mitch Albom is an internationally bestselling author, screenwriter, playwright, and award-winning journalist. He is the author of six consecutive number one New York Times bestsellers and has sold over thirty-five million copies of his books in forty-five languages worldwide, including Tuesdays with Morrie, which is the bestselling memoir of all time.Albom also works as a columnist and broadcaster and has founded eight charities in Detroit and Haiti, where he operates an orphanage. He lives with his wife, Janine, in Michigan.

Niviaq Korneliussen

Niviaq Korneliussen is the twenty-seven-year-old author of the stylish sensational debut novel, Crimson. Korneliussen wrote Crimson in 2014, after receiving a three-month grant from the Greenlandic government. She lives in Nuuk, Greendland.

Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved to New York when she was six, where she attended the Julia Richman High School and Barnard College. In her senior year she edited the college magazine, having decided at the age of sixteen to become a writer. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, was made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. The Talented Mr Ripley, published in 1955, introduced the fascinating anti-hero Tom Ripley, and was made into an Oscar-winning film in 1999 by Anthony Minghella. Graham Greene called Patricia Highsmith 'the poet of apprehension', saying that she 'created a world of her own - a world claustrophobic and irrational which we enter each time with a sense of personal danger' and The Times named her no.1 in their list of the greatest ever crime writers. Patricia Highsmith died in Locarno, Switzerland, in February 1995. Her last novel, Small g: A Summer Idyll, was published posthumously, the same year.

Paul Simpson

PAUL SIMPSON is the author and co-author of over two dozen non-fiction books including A Brief History of the Spy and The Mammoth Book of Prison Breaks.