Related to: 'Nigel Cawthorne'

Robinson

The Curious Cures Of Old England

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Did you know that a child can be cured of the whooping cough by passing it under the belly of a donkey?The history of medicine in Britain is filled with the most bizarre and gruesome cures for many common ailments. Although enthusiastically supported by doctors of the time, many of these cures were often useless and often resulted in the death of the patient.But strange and alarming though many of the cures may seem, some of them did in fact work and provide the basis of much of the medicine we take for granted nowadays. The use of herbs by medieval monks was remarkably effective - and still is today.This highly entertaining and informative book will fascinate anyone who has ever wondered whether doctors really know what they are talking about - just don't try any of the cures mentioned at home!Or that weak eyes can be cured by the application of chicken dung - or alternatively be large draughts of beer taken in the morning?Or that the juice extracted from a bucketful of snails covered in brown sugar and hung over a basin overnight was once used to cure a sore throat?

Robinson

The Ludicrous Laws of Old London

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

London abounds with all manner of ludicrous laws, and not all of these curious statutes have been relegated to the past. Despite the efforts of the Law Commission there are medieval laws that are still in force, and the City of London and its livery companies have their own legal oddities. Laws are made in the capital because parliament is here; so are the Old Bailey, the Law Courts, the House of Lords and, now, the Supreme Court. The privy council, which sometimes has to decide cases, also sits in London, and there were other courts that used to sit in London, from prize courts concerning war booty to ecclesiastical courts. Having maintained its 'ancient rights and freedoms' under Magna Carta, the City felt free to enact its own laws, many of which seem to have had to do with what people could wear. Until quite recently, for example, a man could be arrested for walking down the street wearing a wig, a robe and silk stockings - unless he was a judge. And all human folly has been paraded through the law courts of London, to the extent that it is difficult to know where the serious business of administering justice ends and where farce begins. As law is made in the courtroom as well as in parliament and elsewhere, judges like to keep a firm hand, but sometimes so-called jibbing juries will simply not do what they are told. All sorts of oddities get swept up into the law. Legislators particularly love to pass Acts about sex. If sexual services are being offered in a London massage parlour, for example, a police officer must then search the premises for school children. According to The Children and Young Persons Act of 1933 it is against the law for children and 'yowling persons' between the age of four and sixteen to frequent a brothel. A writ was introduced under both Edward III and Henry IV to ban lawyers from parliament as there were too many of them, the reason being that it was easier for a lawyer to spend his time in London attending parliament that it was for a knight of the shires. But because parliament was already packed with lawyers it was difficult to make any such rule stick. Then an effective way of excluding them was found. They were denied the wages paid to members in those days. Sadly, these days, parliament and the government are packed with lawyers once again. And they are being paid.A law passed in 1540 - and still in force today - makes it illegal for barbers in the City of London to practise surgery; with impeccable impartiality, the Act also forbids surgeons to cut hair. Finally, never forget that under the Vagrancy Act of 1824, you can be convicted of being 'an idle and disorderly person, or a rogue, vagabond, or incorrigible rogue'. The same act also outlaws people 'professing to tell fortunes', including 'palmistry'. Under the Act, it is an offence merely to be suspected.

Piatkus

The Strange Laws Of Old England

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne
Robinson

A Brief Guide To Agatha Christie

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Agatha Christie's 80 novels and short-story collections have sold over 2 billion copies in more than 45 languages, more than any other author. When Christie finally killed off her Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot, the year before she herself died, that 'detestable, bombastic, tiresome, ego-centric little creep' in Christie's words, received a full-page obituary in the New York Times, the only fictional character ever to have done so. From her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, a Poirot mystery, to her last, Sleeping Murder, featuring Miss Marple, Crawford explores Christie's life and fiction. Cawthorne examines recurring characters, such as Captain Arthur Hastings, Poirot's Dr Watson; Chief Inspector Japp, his Lestrade, as well as other flat-footed policemen that Poirot outsmarts on his travels; his efficient secretary, Miss Felicity Lemon; another employee, George; and Ariadne Oliver, a humorous caricature of Christie herself. He looks at the writer's own fascinating: her work as a nurse during the First World War; her strange disappearance after her first husband asked for a divorce; and her exotic expeditions with her second husband, the archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan. He examines the author's working life - her inspirations, methods and oeuvre - and provides biographies of her key characters, their attire, habits and methods, including Poirot's relationships with women, particularly Countess Vera Rossakoff and Miss Amy Carnaby. In doing so, he sheds light on the genteel world of the country house and the Grand Tour between the wars. He takes a look at the numerous adaptations of Christie's stories for stage and screen, especially Poirot's new life in the eponymous long-running and very successful TV series.

Moon Travel

Moon Living Abroad in South Korea (2nd ed)

Jonathan Hopfner
Authors:
Jonathan Hopfner
Moon Travel

Moon Living Abroad in Brazil

Michael Sommers
Authors:
Michael Sommers

Michael Sommers is an expert on Brazilian life,he's lived there for 13 years. In Moon Living Abroad in Brazil , he provides firsthand tips on everything from climate to culture, all in an easy-to-understand manner. Moon Living Abroad in Brazil is packed with essential information and must-have details on setting up daily life, including obtaining visas, arranging finances, gaining employment, choosing schools, and finding health care,plus practical suggestions for how to rent or buy a home for a variety of needs and budgets, whether you're moving to a metropolis or a more rural location. With colour and black and white photos, illustrations, and maps to help you find your way, Moon Living Abroad in Brazil will help you tackle the big move with confidence.

Robinson

A Brief Guide to Jeeves and Wooster

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

A comprehensive guide to P. G. Wodehouse's two best-loved comic characters, Bertram Wilbeforce Wooster and his valet ('Reggie') Jeeves, Bertie's friends and relatives and their world of sunshine, country houses and champagne. Although the stories may seem quintessentially English, they were for the most part written in the United States by a man who spent more than half his adult life there, eventually becoming a citizen in 1955. The first stories involving the two characters are even set in New York, while those that aren't are set in an England that has never existed, contrived to appeal to an American audience. Cawthorne offers fascinating insights into Wodehouse's world, his life - on Long Island and elsewhere - the wonderful short stories and novels and the many adaptations for stage and screen.

Robinson

A Brief Guide to J. R. R. Tolkien

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

A very readable overview of Tolkien and his work, incorporating a brief biography, an examination of the books and a look at the process of filming his work, including The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings saga. It explores how Tolkien's background as a medievalist and linguist informed the languages of Middle-earth, the influence of his Catholicism and Tolkien's legacy in fantasy.A timely book to coincide with the first of Peter Jackson's two keenly awaited Hobbit films.

Robinson

A Brief Guide to James Bond

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne
Robinson

Football Hooligans

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

First-hand accounts of football violence, from infamous Millwall to Man U. Once dubbed 'the English disease', British match-day thuggery has spread right across Europe and beyond. Here is the inside story of that phenomenon from those that were there, taking part in the mayhem. 'Yob Laureate' Dougie Brimson and his brother Eddy offer a compelling description of match-day madness; Colin Ward goes steaming in, while other pieces detail the irresistible aggro of the local Derby, the tragedy inside Heysel Stadium and the violence surrounding England's 1998 World Cup match against Tunisia. Finally, Dougie Brimson asks if the police are not just another 'firm', simply participants in the violence.

Robinson

The Mammoth Book of Sex Scandals

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Sex scandals, some historical but many contemporary, involving political figures, celebrities, movie stars, sports stars, musicians and artists, from Julius Caesar's affair with Cleopatra, which scandalized Rome and may have contributed to his murder, to what exactly IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn did or didn't get up to in that New York hotel room. England's Edward II was put to death by having a red-hot poker shoved up 'those parts in which he had been wont to make his vicious pleasures' and James Dean was known as 'the human ashtray' for the pleasure he took in having cigarettes stubbed out on his body, but from Silvio Berlusconi to Tiger Woods, many have been more focused on pleasure than pain. Even Barack Obama gets a look in - did he have an affair with Vera Baker?

Robinson

The Mammoth Book of New CSI

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne
Robinson

The Mammoth Book of Inside the Elite Forces

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

The most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to American and British special forces, covering all aspects of their equipment, training and deployment in the Iraq age of warfare. It takes a special kind of person to join the Special Forces and those to pass the stringent entrance requirements are subjected to the most rigorous training. They're trained to be super-fit, taught to survive in the most adverse conditions, and turned into killing machines. This book reveals what makes these men tick, and everything you need to know to become one of them. It covers all the types of training required - for fitness, combat, survival, navigation, communication, infiltration, interrogation, extraction and evasion. And it details the full array of weapons used, from small arms and knives to explosives and air back-up. Also included are full listings of all the units - including the SAS, Green Berets, SBS, Navy SEALs, Delta Force, Army Rangers - and their deployment in present-day conflicts such as Desert Storm, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq and anti-terrorist operations.

Piatkus

The Beastly Battles Of Old England

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Throughout history the English have been a warlike lot. Often we fight among ourselves - there have been a good few civil wars - and when we were not slaughtering each other, we practiced on our neighbours, the Scots, the Irish, the French... When that got too easy, we set off around the world to find other people to fight. This was usually done with a hubris that invited some ludicrous pratfall. In The Beastly Battles of Old England, Nigel Cawthorne takes us on a darkly humorous journey through some of our ill-advised military actions. From the war over a severed ear to a general seeking out his rival's mistresses to even the score, it is a miscellany of insufferable arrogance, reckless gallantry, stunning stupidity, massive misjudgements and general beastliness.

C & R Crime

The Mammoth Book of Killers at Large

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Reason to be afraid - over 50 unsolved cases of serial murder Fact: murderers and serial killers do not always get caught. Behind every headline of a newsworthy conviction lie other cases of vicious murderers who got away, and who remain somewhere among us. Here in one giant volume are more than 50 of the most serious serial killings and other murder cases that continue to remain unsolved. The cases covered in this alarming book include: " Argentina's crazed highway killer, responsible for mutilating and killing at least five people since 1997, and dumping their bodies along remote highways " The Green River Killer, believed to be a middle-aged white man, who has claimed at least 49 lives to date in the Seattle-Tacoma area " South Africa's 'Phoenix Strangler', suspected of killing 20 women in the province of KwaZulu Natal. " The Twin Cities Killer - either one or several people responsible for a series of over 30 murders on the streets of Minneapolis and St. Paul, where the victims were mostly prostitutes " Costa Rica's elusive 'El Psicópata' (The Psychopath), thought to have murdered at least 19 people in this small quiet Central American country " 'The Monster of Florence', responsible for a series of 15 sexual slayings just outside Florence In each case it is not just the crimes that are horrifying and fascinating, but the response of local police and authorities to the lack of a conviction. Local authorities may fear to admit the continued existence of a serial killer at large; whilst police bodies face the temptation to 'tidy up' loose unsolved murders under the aegis of other admitted crimes.

Robinson

A Brief History of Sherlock Holmes

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, Sherlock Holmes appears in four novels and fifty-six short stories. Although Holmes was not the first literary detective, he continues to have a perennial allure as the ultimate sleuth. As Holmes is being re-introduced to a new audience through TV and film, Cawthorne introduces the general reader to Holmes and his creator Arthur Conan Doyle. He gives a full biography of author as well as his creation, including his resurrection following his unlikely death at the hands of arch enemy, Moriarty. Cawthorne also surveys the world of Holmes, looking at Victorian crime, the real characters behind Dr Watson and Inspector Lestrade, as well as the world on the doorstep of 22b Baker Street.

Robinson

A Brief History of Robin Hood

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne
Constable

Jack the Ripper's Secret Confession

David Monaghan, Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
David Monaghan, Nigel Cawthorne

While Jack the Ripper spread fear throughout the East End of London in 1888, another man stalked the streets hunting flesh. He called himself "Walter". He was a rapist, voyeur, and fetishist obsessed with prostitutes. Walter was not only a wealthy man, but a literary one. In the same year as the Ripper killings, Walter first printed up his vast memoir of sex and perversion under the title My Secret Life. Fewer than 20 sets were struck off on a secret Amsterdam press between 1888 and 1894. Long banned for obscenity, only censored excerpts of Walter's masterwork were seen for a century. One of the few complete sets not destroyed by the authorities was locked away in the British Library's closed cupboard. This is the story of the volumes in that locked room and the horrific clue they contain - a clue that unlocks the diary as the final confession of Jack the Ripper. Jack the Ripper's Secret Confession shows how this notorious work of Victorian pornography reveals that its author had the means, the motive and the opportunity to be Jack the Ripper. As importantly, it delves into dark psychiatric motives within the text, to show Walter possessed the unique psycho-sexual fingerprint of a knife killer.

Piatkus

The Sex Secrets Of Old England

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne

Once again, Nigel Cawthorne takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the strange, hidden sexual history of England. The history of sex in Britain has been largely glossed over by 'proper' historians: Nigel Cawthorne has burrowed deep into the archives to reveal exactly what our ancestors got up to in bed (and out of it). There are chapters on the ancient arts of seduction, adultery, brothels, 'the English vice', contraception, defloration, and many more - from the torrid Tudors to the supposedly strait-laced Victorians.

Robinson

The Mammoth Book of the Mafia

Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne