Related to: 'Cleve Jones'

Constable

Lucky Man

Greg Lake
Authors:
Greg Lake

Greg Lake first won acclaim as lead vocalist, bass guitarist and producer when, together with Robert Fripp, he formed King Crimson. Their first album, the landmark In the Court of the Crimson King, co-produced by Greg, featured the iconic song '21st Century Schizoid Man'. King Crimson pioneered progressive rock and paved the way for many famous bands that followed, from Yes and Genesis to the Red Hot Chilli Peppers.In 1970 Greg met fellow legend Keith Emerson during a North American tour; the two shared common bonds: European musical influences and a desire to reinterpret classical works while creating a new musical genre. After being introduced to drummer Carl Palmer, they formed the first progressive rock supergroup Emerson, Lake and Palmer.To date ELP has sold over 50 million records. Lake produced Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Tarkus, Pictures at an Exhibition, Trilogy, Brain Salad Surgery, Works Vol. 1 and 2, and two different live albums. All went platinum and featured a series of hit singles, most written and all sung by Lake. The three created a unique live theatrical performance which featured Emerson attacking his keyboards with knives, Palmer playing a 2.5 ton stainless steel kit and Lake performing on a £6,000 Persian rug which had its own roadie. One of their very first performances was at the historic Isle of Wight Festival in 1970 and they went on to headline California Jam, one of the biggest concerts of the 1970s, attended by 350,000 people.Probably the voice of his generation, Greg fronted the greatest rock supergroup of the 1970s but never held with the 'progressive' tag that attached itself to both the music and the excess. Lucky Man not only charts the highs and lows of a career in rock music but also reflects on the death of Keith Emerson last year, living with terminal cancer and the end of life. Greg can best be summed up by his now-famous line: 'Material wealth is a very fleeting pleasure ... when you can buy anything you want and do anything you want, you soon discover that you actually don't want any of it.'

Fleet

Prairie Fires

Caroline Fraser
Authors:
Caroline Fraser

Millions of readers of Little House on the Prairie believe they know Laura Ingalls - the pioneer girl who survived blizzards and near-starvation on the Great Plains where 'as far as a man could go to the north in a day, or a week, or a whole month, there was nothing but woods. There were no houses'. Her books are beloved around the world.But the true story of her life has never been fully told. The Little House books were not only fictionalized but brilliantly edited, a profound act of myth-making and self-transformation. Now, drawing on unpublished manuscripts, letters, diaries, and land and financial records, Caroline Fraser, the editor of the Library of America edition of the Little House series, masterfully fills in the gaps in Wilder's biography, setting the record straight regarding charges of ghostwriting that have swirled around the books and uncovering the grown-up story behind the most influential childhood epic of pioneer life.Set against nearly a century of epochal change, from the Homestead Act and the Indian Wars to the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, Wilder's dramatic life provides a unique perspective on American history and our national mythology of self-reliance. Settling on the frontier amidst land-rush speculation, Wilder's family encountered Biblical tribulations of locusts and drought, fire and ruin. Deep in debt after a series of personal tragedies, including the loss of a child and her husband's stroke, Wilder uprooted herself again, crisscrossing the country and turning to menial work to support her family. In middle age, she began writing a farm advice column, prodded by her self-taught journalist daughter. And at the age of sixty, after losing nearly everything in the Depression, she turned to children's books, recasting her hardscrabble childhood as a triumphal vision of homesteading - and achieving fame and fortune in the process, in one of the most astonishing rags-to-riches stories in American letters.Offering fresh insight and new discoveries about Wilder's life and times, Prairie Fires reveals the complex woman who defined the American pioneer character, and whose artful blend of fact and fiction grips us to this day.

Basic Books

Designing Reality

Neil Gershenfeld, Alan Gershenfeld, Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld
Authors:
Neil Gershenfeld, Alan Gershenfeld, Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld
Constable

When We Rise

Cleve Jones
Authors:
Cleve Jones

The partial inspiration for the acclaimed mini-series from Academy Award-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance BlackBorn in 1954, Cleve Jones was among the last generation of gay Americans who grew up wondering if there were others out there like himself. There were. Like thousands of other young people, Jones, nearly penniless, was drawn in the early 1970s to San Francisco, a city electrified by progressive politics and sexual freedom. Jones found community - in the hotel rooms and ramshackle apartments shared by other young adventurers, in the city's bathhouses and gay bars like The Stud, and in the burgeoning gay district, the Castro, where a New York transplant named Harvey Milk set up a camera shop, began shouting through his bullhorn, and soon became the nation's most outspoken gay elected official. With Milk's encouragement, Jones dove into politics and found his calling in 'the movement.' When Milk was killed by an assassin's bullet in 1978, Jones took up his mentor's progressive mantle - only to see the arrival of AIDS transform his life once again. By turns tender and uproarious - and written entirely in his own words - When We Rise is Jones' account of his remarkable life. He chronicles the heartbreak of losing countless friends to AIDS, which very nearly killed him, too; his co-founding of the San Francisco AIDS Foundation during the terrifying early years of the epidemic; his conception of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, the largest community art project in history; the bewitching story of 1970s San Francisco and the magnetic spell it cast for thousands of young gay people and other misfits; and the harrowing, sexy, and sometimes hilarious stories of Cleve's passionate relationships with friends and lovers during an era defined by both unprecedented freedom and possibility, and prejudice and violence alike. When We Rise is not only the story of a hero to the LQBTQ community, but the vibrantly voice memoir of a full and transformative American life - an activist whose work continues today.

Hachette Books

When We Rise

Cleve Jones
Authors:
Cleve Jones

Born in 1954, Cleve Jones was part of the last generation of gay people who grew up not knowing if there was anyone else on the entire planet who felt the same way he did. It wasn't until Jones was fourteen, flipping through the pages of Life magazine, when he saw the headline "Homosexuals in Revolt!" followed by several pages of text and photographs of the new gay rights movement, including photos of men marching with fists in the air through the streets of Greenwich Village, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, that he understood that he was part of a larger community. To say Cleve was thrilled to discover this movement is an understatement; it saved his life. In the early 1970s Cleve moved to San Francisco, a city whose beautiful streets, progressive politics, and sexually charged nightlife were drawing in thousands of young gay men every year from towns across America. After some time in Europe, Jones took an internship in Harvey Milk's City Hall office, and Milk would become Cleve's mentor, an experience that would bring Cleve the forefront of the gay rights movement (and make him a witness to Milk's 1978 assassination). With the onset of the AIDS crisis in the early 1980s Jones emerged as one the gay community's most outspoken activists - a role that continues to today. In 1983, Cleve co-founded the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and in 1987 founded The NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, the world's largest community arts project. In 2009 he led the National March for Equality in Washington, D.C. From one of the most iconic living LGBTQ activists,WHEN WE RISE is a beautifully written memoir that brings to life the drama and heartbreak of the AIDS crisis - and the lost San Francisco and lost generation of men who came before it.

Robinson

No Milk Today

Andrew Ward
Authors:
Andrew Ward

Traditionally, in British society, the milkman has been a family friend, a sex symbol and a cheerful chappie. He has been the eyes and ears of the community, and his genetic legacy has supposedly passed into the lineage of housewives.This collection of folk tales about milkmen covers the history of the job and the milkman's everyday experience. The book is structured by the milkman's working day. It starts with the alarm-clock and ends with the milkman returning home in search of sustenance and tender loving care. The book is less about changes in the dairy industry and more about the work experiences of the people who have delivered milk. Many milkmen are featured: Chris Frankland delivered over eight million pints before he retired at seventy-four; Alistair Maclean drove two million miles across the north coast of Scotland in fifty years; and Tony Fowler, an award-winning Leicestershire milkman, helped to put over fifty people in prison.For more than thirty years the author has collected milkman stories through oral testimony, newspaper archives, anecdotes, diaries, books and more formal interviews.Praise for the author:Barnsley: A Study in Football, 1953-59 (with Ian Alister, Crowberry 1981)'A rare example of folk history . . . a work thankfully free of sick parrots, bulging nets and exclusive revelations.' (The Yorkshire Post)'riveting, dreamy, passionate, valuable and stuff of a past era which must not be forgotten . . . I read it in an all-night session.' (Frank Keating, Guardian)Cricket's Strangest Matches (Robson 1990)'Ward has an eye for the unusual and nicely dry style.' (Sunday Correspondent)Three Sides of the Mersey (with Rogan Taylor and John Williams, Robson, 1993)'. . . a labour of love. Built from copious interviews with players, club staff, and fans going back to the Twenties, it provides a permanent record of a 32-part series broadcast on Radio City last season. It's a compendious portrait of Liverpool's passion for football, and an endearing social history along the way.' (Independent)Armed with a Football (Crowberry 1994)'A riveting read for the maverick fan' (Independent)Kicking and Screaming (with Rogan Taylor, Robson, 1995)'Borrowing the straightforward oral history technique favoured by Studs Terkel and Lynn MacDonald, the authors assemble the memories of players, managers and fans into a mosaic from which an affectionate portrait of the English game emerges, with all its faults and virtues.' (Guardian)The Day of the Hillsborough Disaster (with Rogan Taylor and Tim Newburn, Liverpool University Press, 1995)'In many ways Taylor, Ward and Newburn have produced one of the best oral histories ever produced.' (Oral History)'It is the most dignified and respectful of memorials to the dead, dedicated to those who must still struggle with the consequences of the disaster, and it never succombs to the morbid or maudlin.' (Observer)'It is the most extraordinary account of what happened . . . Their book is gripping and extremely moving. After such tragedy, this book is cathartic.' (FourFourTwo)I'm on Me Mobile (with Anton Rippon, 2000)'One of the best came at Gloucester magistrates court in January 1994, when the defendant's phone rang. 'Can't talk now,' he said. 'I'm in the dock.' (Guardian)'One of the things that was in it was a woman saying "hang on a minute, I'll just get out my handbook and look under womb".' (Amazon)Football Nation (with John Williams, Bloomsbury, 2009)'Based on a dazzling array of largely oral evidence and written with a deeply attractive mixture of authority and humanity, it offers a bewitching, kaleidoscopic, alternative history of our national game since the war . . . Football is so often its own worst enemy, but Ward and Williams will remind many jaundiced readers why they fell in love with it.' (History Today)The Birth Father's Tale (BAAF, 2012)'Very personal account of Ward's search for his son, more than thirty years after the machinery of adoption removed him from Ward's life.' (Therapy Today)

PublicAffairs

Raising the Floor

Andy Stern, Lee Kravitz
Authors:
Andy Stern, Lee Kravitz

Advances in technology are creating the next economy and enabling us to make things o things/connect with others in smarter, cheaper, faster, more effective ways. But the price of this progress has been a decoupling of the engine of prosperity from jobs that have been the means by which people have ascended to (and stayed in) the middle class.Andy Stern, the former president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) spent four years traveling the country and asking economists, futurists, labour leaders, CEOs, investment bankers, entrepreneurs, and political leaders to help picture the U.S. economy 25 to 30 years from now. He vividly reports on people who are analyzing and creating this new economy,such as investment banker Steve Berkenfeld David Cote, the CEO of Honeywell International Andy Grove of Intel Carl Camden, the CEO of Kelly Services and Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children's Zone. Through these stories, we come to a stark and deeper understanding of the toll technological progress will continue to take on jobs and income and its inevitable effect on tens of millions of people.But there is hope for our economy and future. The foundation of economic prosperity for all Americans, Stern believes, is a universal basic income. The idea of a universal basic income for all Americans is controversial but American attitudes are shifting. Stern has been a game changer throughout his career, and his next goal is to create a movement that will force the political establishment to take action against something that many on both the right and the left believe is inevitable. Stern's plan is bold, idealistic, and challenging,and its time has come.

Da Capo Press

Suck and Blow

Dean Budnick, John Popper
Authors:
Dean Budnick, John Popper
Basic Books

Stand by Me

Jim Downs
Authors:
Jim Downs

Despite the tremendous gains of the LGBT movement in recent years, the history of gay life in this country remains poorly understood. According to conventional wisdom, gay liberation started with the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village in 1969. The 1970s represented a moment of triumph- both political and sexual- before the AIDS crisis in the subsequent decade, which, in the view of many, exposed the problems inherent in the so-called gay lifestyle".In Stand by Me , the acclaimed historian Jim Downs rewrites the history of gay life in the 1970s, arguing that the decade was about much more than sex and marching in the streets. Drawing on a vast trove of untapped records at LGBT community centres in Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia, Downs tells moving, revelatory stories of gay people who stood together- as friends, fellow believers, and colleagues- to create a sense of community among people who felt alienated from mainstream American life.As Downs shows, gay people found one another in the Metropolitan Community Church, a nationwide gay religious group in the pages of the Body Politic , a newspaper that encouraged its readers to think of their sexuality as a political identity at the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookstore, the hub of gay literary life in New York City and at theatres putting on Gay American History," a play that brought to the surface the enduring problem of gay oppression.These and many other achievements would be largely forgotten after the arrival in the early 1980s of HIV/AIDS, which allowed critics to claim that sex was the defining feature of gay liberation. This reductive narrative set back the cause of gay rights and has shaped the identities of gay people for decades.An essential act of historical recovery, Stand by Me shines a bright light on a triumphant moment, and will transform how we think about gay life in America from the 1970s into the present day.

Basic Books

One Nation Under God

Kevin M. Kruse
Authors:
Kevin M. Kruse

We're often told that the United States is, was, and always has been a Christian nation. But in One Nation Under God , historian Kevin M. Kruse reveals that the idea of Christian America" is an invention,and a relatively recent one at that.As Kruse argues, the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation originated in the 1930s when businessmen enlisted religious activists in their fight against FDR's New Deal. Corporations from General Motors to Hilton Hotels bankrolled conservative clergymen, encouraging them to attack the New Deal as a program of pagan statism" that perverted the central principle of Christianity: the sanctity and salvation of the individual. Their campaign for freedom under God" culminated in the election of their close ally Dwight Eisenhower in 1952.But this apparent triumph had an ironic twist. In Eisenhower's hands, a religious movement born in opposition to the government was transformed into one that fused faith and the federal government as never before. During the 1950s, Eisenhower revolutionized the role of religion in American political culture, inventing new traditions from inaugural prayers to the National Prayer Breakfast. Meanwhile, Congress added the phrase under God" to the Pledge of Allegiance and made In God We Trust" the country's first official motto. With private groups joining in, church membership soared to an all-time high of 69%. For the first time, Americans began to think of their country as an officially Christian nation.During this moment, virtually all Americans,across the religious and political spectrum,believed that their country was one nation under God." But as Americans moved from broad generalities to the details of issues such as school prayer, cracks began to appear. Religious leaders rejected this lowest common denomination" public religion, leaving conservative political activists to champion it alone. In Richard Nixon's hands, a politics that conflated piety and patriotism became sole property of the right.Provocative and authoritative, One Nation Under God reveals how the unholy alliance of money, religion, and politics created a false origin story that continues to define and divide American politics to this day.

Da Capo Press

Crucible of Command

William C. Davis
Authors:
William C. Davis

They met in person only four times, yet these two men- Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee- determined the outcome of America's most divisive war and cast larger-than-life shadows over their reunited nation. They came from vastly different backgrounds: Lee from a distinguished family of waning fortunes Grant, a young man on the make in a new America. Differing circumstances coloured their outlooks on life: Lee, the melancholy realist Grant, the incurable optimist.Then came the Civil War that made them both commanders of armies, leaders of men, and heroes to the multitudes of Americans then and since who rightfully place them in the pantheon of our greatest soldiers. Forged in battle as generals, these two otherwise very different men became almost indistinguishable in their instincts, attributes, attitudes, and skills in command.Each the subject of innumerable biographies, Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee have never before been paired as they are here. Exploring their personalities, their characters, their ethical and moral compasses, and their political and military worlds, William C. Davis, one of America's preeminent historians, uses substantial, newly discovered evidence on both men to find surprising similarities between them, as well as new insights and unique interpretations on how their lives prepared them for the war they fought and influenced how they fought it. Crucible of Command is both a gripping narrative of the final year of the war and a fresh, revealing portrait of these two great commanders as they took each other's measure across the battlefield with the aid of millions of men.

Basic Books

The Eve of Destruction

James T. Patterson
Authors:
James T. Patterson

At the beginning of 1965, the U.S. seemed on the cusp of a golden age. Although Americans had been shocked by the assassination in 1963 of President Kennedy, they exuded a sense of consensus and optimism that showed no signs of abating. Indeed, political liberalism and interracial civil rights activism made it appear as if 1965 would find America more progressive and unified than it had ever been before. In January 1965, President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed that the country had no irreconcilable conflicts."Johnson, who was an extraordinarily skillful manager of Congress, succeeded in securing an avalanche of Great Society legislation in 1965, including Medicare, immigration reform, and a powerful Voting Rights Act. But as esteemed historian James T. Patterson reveals in The Eve of Destruction , that sense of harmony dissipated over the course of the year. As Patterson shows, 1965 marked the birth of the tumultuous era we now know as The Sixties," when American society and culture underwent a major transformation. Turmoil erupted in the American South early in the year, when police attacked civil rights demonstrators in Selma, Alabama. Many black leaders, outraged, began to lose faith in nonviolent and interracial strategies of protest. Meanwhile, the U.S. rushed into a deadly war in Vietnam, inciting rebelliousness at home. On August 11th, five days after Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, racial violence exploded in the Watts area of Los Angeles. The six days of looting and arson that followed shocked many Americans and cooled their enthusiasm for the president's remaining initiatives. As the national mood darkened, the country became deeply divided. By the end of 1965, a conservative resurgence was beginning to redefine the political scene even as developments in popular music were enlivening the Left.In The Eve of Destruction , Patterson traces the events of this transformative year, showing how they dramatically reshaped the nation and reset the course of American life.

Moon Travel

Moon Pittsburgh (3rd ed)

Dan Eldridge
Authors:
Dan Eldridge

Long-time Pennsylvania resident Dan Eldridge provides a quirky look at Pittsburgh, from riding up the Duquesne Incline to grabbing a beer at a hipster bar in South Side to visiting the Andy Warhol Museum. Dan includes unique trip ideas like Out with the Parents, Fun and Cheap, and Go Where the Locals Go. Packed with information on dining, transportation, and accommodations, this guide provides options for a range of travel budgets. Complete with details on the best insider spots and how to make the most of two days in the city, Moon Pittsburgh gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

PublicAffairs

So Much to Do

Richard Ravitch
Authors:
Richard Ravitch
Basic Books

A Dreadful Deceit

Jacqueline Jones
Authors:
Jacqueline Jones

In 1656, a Maryland planter tortured and killed an enslaved man named Antonio, an Angolan who refused to work in the fields. Three hundred years later, Simon P. Owens battled soul-deadening technologies as well as the fiction of race" that divided him from his co-workers in a Detroit auto-assembly plant. Separated by time and space, Antonio and Owens nevertheless shared a distinct kind of political vulnerability they lacked rights and opportunities in societies that accorded marked privileges to people labeled white." An American creation myth posits that these two black men were the victims of racial" discrimination, a primal prejudice that the United States has haltingly but gradually repudiated over the course of many generations. In A Dreadful Deceit , award-winning historian Jacqueline Jones traces the lives of Antonio, Owens, and four other African Americans to illustrate the strange history of race" in America. In truth, Jones shows, race does not exist, and the very factors that we think of as determining it, a person's heritage or skin colour,are mere pretexts for the brutalization of powerless people by the powerful. Jones shows that for decades, southern planters did not even bother to justify slavery by invoking the concept of race only in the late eighteenth century did whites begin to rationalize the exploitation and marginalization of blacks through notions of racial" difference. Indeed, race amounted to a political strategy calculated to defend overt forms of discrimination, as revealed in the stories of Boston King, a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina Elleanor Eldridge, a savvy but ill-starred businesswoman in antebellum Providence, Rhode Island Richard W. White, a Union veteran and Republican politician in post-Civil War Savannah and William Holtzclaw, founder of an industrial school for blacks in Mississippi, where many whites opposed black schooling of any kind. These stories expose the fluid, contingent, and contradictory idea of race, and the disastrous effects it has had, both in the past and in our own supposedly post-racial society.Expansive, visionary, and provocative, A Dreadful Deceit explodes the pernicious fiction that has shaped four centuries of American history.

Nation Books

Dollarocracy

Robert W McChesney, Bernie Sanders, John Nichols
Authors:
Robert W McChesney, Bernie Sanders, John Nichols

Fresh from the first 10 billion election campaign, two award-winning authors show how unbridled campaign spending defines our politics and, failing a dramatic intervention, signals the end of our democracy.Blending vivid reporting from the 2012 campaign trail and deep perspective from decades covering American and international media and politics, political journalist John Nichols and media critic Robert W. McChesney explain how US elections are becoming controlled, predictable enterprises that are managed by a new class of consultants who wield millions of dollars and define our politics as never before. As the money gets bigger,especially after the Citizens United ruling,and journalism, a core check and balance on the government, declines, American citizens are in danger of becoming less informed and more open to manipulation. With ground-breaking behind-the-scenes reporting and staggering new research on the money power," Dollarocracy shows that this new power does not just endanger electoral politics it is a challenge to the DNA of American democracy itself.

Nation Books

Rebuild the Dream

Van Jones
Authors:
Van Jones
Robinson

Mammoth Books presents Missing Persons and Mysterious Deaths

Jon E. Lewis
Authors:
Jon E. Lewis

Alexander LitvinenkoMr Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian living in London, was poisoned by Polonium-210, traced by alpha detectors to a British Airways flight from Moscow to Heathrow. A Champions League match between Arsenal and CKSA Moscow had brought thousands of Russian fans to London. Was one of them responsible for Litvinenko's death?American MIA in VietnamIs it possible that prisoners of war still remain left behind in Vietnam?ChemtrailsPolluted contrails that rain death and disease. Who would commit such a ruthless act?Christopher MarloweMarlowe was a rake and a radical, a homosexual and an atheist, but what really happened to this notorious free-thinking Elizabethan in 1593?Diana, Princess of WalesMohamed Al-Fayed, Harrod's owner and the man who might have become Diana's father-in-law, points the finger at Prince Phillip, the Queen's husband, an accusation which sparked a multi-million pound investigation.Dr David KellyThe UK scientist and weapons expert found dead just days after being identified as the source who cast doubt on the claim that Saddam Hussein could have fired a weapon of mass destruction at 45 minutes notice. Was it suicide, or murder?Elvis PresleyElvis is supposedly alive and well, and has been spotted countless times since his death in 1977. But Elvis fans inadvertently add to the hysteria by dressing like him - has anyone actually seen the real Elvis Presley?Gemstone FileThis 1,000 page document claims that a great deal of suppressed information has played a role in shaping world events since the 1950's. Do the mafia and other corrupt politicians have anything to do with the Kennedy assassinations and other major historical events?Hilda MurrellDid campaigner Hilda Murrell suffer a state-sponsored death because she knew too much? Or was this really just an unfortunate end to a botched burglary?HIV and AidsWas Human Immunodeficiency Virus deliberately engineered as part of a racist plot to reduce the world's population?John F. KennedyWho was with Lee Harvey Oswald when he supposedly killed the US President?Jimmy HoffaThe ex-president of the US Teamsters Union ate a meal at Machus Red Fox restaurant in Detroit, paid for his meal and walked straight out straight into an American mythology. What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?John LennonIt seems clear that John Lennon's assassinator, Mark David Chapman, was simply a deranged fan, or is there some truth to the theory that he was actually a Manchurian Candidate, brainwashed and pre-programmed to kill on command?Karen SilkwoodLabour union activist Karen Silkwood was allegedly murdered to prevent her blowing the whistle on the Kerr-McGee nuclear company.Malcolm XHayer, Butler and Johnson were convicted of first-degree murder, but with all the evidence gathered, is it possible that the FBI set up Malcolm X for assassination by black radicals?Marilyn MonroeHer death may well have been assumed to have been a suicide if not for her long string of high-profile boyfriends. But if one of them killed her, which one was it?Martin BormannHitler's right hand man and head of the Nazi party Chancellery death has continued to cause controversy despite his supposed death in 1945. Bormann is said to have lived on after the war and stayed hidden from view, yet forensic identification documents state otherwise, so why do the conspiracy theories on Bormann persist?Martin Luther KingTo this day millions believe James Earl Ray did not have the capability to execute Martin Luther King alone, but is it true that Ray was merely a patsy?Montauk PointSupposedly a centre for research into exotic psychological welfare techniques, the Montauk project actually calls into question our whole experience of reality, truth and the universe.Norman KirkThe radical leader of the New Zealand Labour Party had begun a series of attacks on trilateralists, two years later he was found dead, quickly replaced by Wallace Rowling. Are those who think his sudden death from a heart attack just a bit too convenient right to suspect foul play?PROMISWas conspiracy researcher Danny Casolaro silenced to stop his investigation into the theft of PROMIS software?Robert F KennedyPalestinian immigrant Sirhan Sirhan, the man arrested for the assassination of Robert Kennedy, cannot have committed the crime alone. His gun held a mere eight bullets, yet Kennedy was shot eleven times.Robert MaxwellThe corpse of British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell was found floating close to his yacht off the Canary Islands on the 5th of November 1991. Many people believe Maxwell's death is dubious, why then, was his family so happy to accept his accidental death?Rudolf HessIn 1941 Hitler's Deputy Fuhrer flew a stolen Me110 German fighter plane to Britain on what Hitler affirmed was a mad private 'peace mission', did Hitler approve of Hess's star-crossed plan? Or perhaps he was lured to Britain?Tupac ShakurDid Notorious BIG, fellow rap superstar contract the hit on rival Tupac Shakur, or is he alive and well living in Witness Protection?Wolfgang Amadeus MozartMozart was supposedly killed by his rival composer Antonio Salieri, but not necessarily by cold-blooded physical murder. Some believed Salieri ordered Mozart to work himself to death by anonymously commissioning a requiem mass against an impossible deadline. But why then would his wife allow Salieri to teach their son music?

Civitas Books

Some of Us Did Not Die

June Jordan
Authors:
June Jordan

"She remains a thinker and activist who'insists upon complexity.' "Reamy Jansen, San Francisco Chronicle * Some of Us Did Not Die brings together a rich sampling of the late poet June Jordan's prose writings. The essays in this collection, which include her last writings and span the length of her extraordinary career, reveal Jordan as an incisive analyst of the personal and public costs of remaining committed to the ideal and practice of democracy. Willing to venture into the most painful contradictions of American culture and politics, Jordan comes back with lyrical honesty, wit, and wide-ranging intelligence in these accounts of her reckoning with life as a teacher, poet, activist, and citizen.

Abacus

Like People In History

Felice Picano
Authors:
Felice Picano