Related to: 'Michael Paterson'

Constable

Backing into the Spotlight

Michael Whitehall
Authors:
Michael Whitehall

'Backing into the Spotlight is a hilarious and an unashamedly non-PC memoir . . . Now in his eighth decade, Whitehall is a fine raconteur, gloriously unreconstructed and still deeply suspicious of modernity' Daily MailStanding in front of a full-length mirror in my dressing room at ITV studios, waiting to go on to the set of Backchat, I had a brief conversation with my reflection.'Michael, what the f*** do you think you're doing?'Theatrical agent Michael Whitehall spent a career pushing others into the spotlight. He had been involved behind the scenes with the careers of many prominent actors, including Colin Firth, Richard Griffiths, Daniel Day-Lewis, Tom Courtenay, Ian Ogilvy, Judi Dench, Edward Fox, Michael Fassbender, Angela Thorne and Nigel Havers.But then, much to his surprise, his son Jack becomes a successful comedian and actor and decides that his new comedy partner should be his father. Whitehall Snr. finds himself reluctantly appearing on stage and then television, cast as the archetypal grumpy old man and thrust, in his early seventies, into a whole new career in front of the camera. Minor fame comes at a sedate pace: one of the highlights being a record £300,000 win for charity with Jack on Channel 4's The Million Pound Drop.In this enchanting memoir Whitehall looks back on his life, from growing up in suburban London in the 1940s and '50s with his saintly father and social climbing-mother, who coined the phrase 'à la carte' to describe people who were posher than she was and whose company she craved, to falling into a career as a successful theatrical agent and producer. As he says, 'Actors can be egotistical, greedy and vain, but they're not half as bad as agents and producers.'Charming, gossipy and above all very funny, Backing Into The Spotlight is no ordinary show business memoir.

Robinson

50 Years of MAC

Mark Bryant, Stanley McMurtry
Contributors:
Mark Bryant, Stanley McMurtry
Robinson

Dogs

Mark Bryant
Authors:
Mark Bryant

A wonderful selection of writing on dogs, from Plato to Virginia Woolf, and from ancient Egypt to twentieth-century New YorkFrom beautiful lyrics to madcap waggery, from Elizabeth Barrett Browning's adored lap-dog Flush to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's terrifying Hound of the Baskervilles, and encompassing odes, fables, stories, songs, nursery rhymes and more, Mark Bryant has compiled a wonderfully evocative collection of writing on all kinds of dogs by all kinds of authors. Included are poems by Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Rudyard Kipling, Lord Byron, William Wordsworth, Robert Burns and more; humorous pieces by Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, Ambrose Bierce and Jerome K. Jerome; and other delights from writers as varied as Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Christina Rossetti, Anton Chekhov, Mark Twain, the Brothers Grimm, Edith Wharton, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Louisa M. Alcott, Gertrude Stein, Katherine Mansfield, Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot and Jack London, amongst others. Covering every genre, from humour and fantasy to romance and horror, and drawn from every part of the world, these stories, poems and excerpts from essays, letters, diaries and journals provide a collection to delight any dog-lover.

Robinson

A Brief History of Florence Nightingale

Hugh Small
Authors:
Hugh Small
Robinson

Nicholas II, The Last Tsar

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson
Robinson

Her Majesty the Queen, as Seen by MAC

Mark Bryant, Stanley McMurtry
Contributors:
Mark Bryant, Stanley McMurtry
Constable

The New Book of Snobs

D.J. Taylor
Authors:
D.J. Taylor

'Hugely enjoyable' AN Wilson, Sunday Times'Thoughtful, entertaining and enjoyable' Michael Gove, Book of the Week, The TimesInspired by William Makepeace Thackeray, the first great analyst of snobbery, and his trail-blazing The Book of Snobs (1848), D. J. Taylor brings us a field guide to the modern snob. Short of calling someone a racist or a paedophile, one of the worst charges you can lay at anybody's door in the early twenty-first century is to suggest that they happen to be a snob. But what constitutes snobbishness? Who are the snobs and where are they to be found? Are you a snob? Am I? What are the distinguishing marks? Snobbery is, in fact, one of the keys to contemporary British life, as vital to the backstreet family on benefits as the proprietor of the grandest stately home, and an essential element of their view of who of they are and what the world might be thought to owe them.The New Book of Snobs will take a marked interest in language, the vocabulary of snobbery - as exemplified in the 'U' and 'Non U' controversy of the 1950s - being a particular field in which the phenomenon consistently makes its presence felt, and alternate social analysis with sketches of groups and individuals on the Thackerayan principle. Prepare to meet the Political Snob, the City Snob, the Technology Snob, the Property Snob, the Rural Snob, the Literary Snob, the Working-class Snob, the Sporting Snob, the Popular Cultural Snob and the Food Snob.

Robinson

Cats

Mark Bryant
Authors:
Mark Bryant

From beautiful lyrics to madcap waggery, from the prime suspect in a partridge killing in ancient Greece to the medieval monk's cat Pangur Bán and encompassing odes, fables, stories, limericks, songs, nursery rhymes and more, Mark Bryant has compiled a wonderfully evocative collection of writing of all kinds on cats by those who love them. There are poems from Chaucer, Baudelaire, Emily Dickinson, Thomas Hardy, Christina Rossetti, Shelley and Wordsworth; humorous pieces by Lewis Carroll, Ambrose Bierce, Edward Lear and Jerome K. Jerome; and other delights from writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Saki and Mark Twain. From ancient Egypt to the recent past, covering every genre, from humour and fantasy to romance and horror, and drawn from every part of the world, these stories, poems and excerpts from essays, letters, diaries and journals provide a collection to delight any cat-lover.

Robinson

The Impossible Zoo

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie

Robinson

A Brief Guide to Celtic Myths and Legends

Martyn Whittock
Authors:
Martyn Whittock

Robinson

A Brief History of the House of Windsor

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson
Robinson

Private Life in Britain's Stately Homes

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson

The Victorian and Edwardian eras in the run-up to 1914 marked the golden age of the English country house, when opulence and formality attained a level that would never be matched again. The ease of these perfect settings for flirtation and relaxation was maintained by a large and well-trained staff of servants. Although those 'in service' worked very long hours and had little personal freedom, many were proud of their positions and grateful for the relative security these gave. Indeed, the strictly hierarchical world below stairs could be more snobbish than that of a house's owners. Michael Paterson skilfully and entertainingly explores the myths and realities of this vanished world, both upstairs and down.

Robinson

A Brief History of the Private Life of Elizabeth II

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson
Constable

At the Chime of a City Clock

D.J. Taylor
Authors:
D.J. Taylor

Summer 1931 in seedy Bayswater and James Ross is on his uppers. An aspiring writer whose stories nobody will buy ('It's the slump'), with a landlady harassing him for unpaid rent and occasional sleepless nights spent in the waiting room at King's Cross Station, he is reduced to selling carpet-cleaning lotion door-to-door. His prospects brighten when he meets the glamorous Suzi ('the red hair and the tight jumper weren't a false card: she really was a looker and no mistake'), but their relationship turns out to be a source of increasing bafflement. Who is her boss, the mysterious Mr Rasmussen - whose face bears a startling resemblance to one of the portraits in Police News - and why he so interested in the abandoned premises above the Cornhill jeweller's shop?Worse, mysterious Mr Haversham from West End Central is starting to take an interest in his affairs. With a brief to keep an eye on Schmiegelow, James finds himself staying incognito at a grand Society weekend at a country house in Sussex, where the truth - about Suzi and her devious employer - comes as an unexpected shock. Set against a backdrop of the 1931 financial crisis and the abandonment of the Gold Standard, acted out in shabby bed-sitters and Lyons tea-shops, At the Chime of a City Clock is an authentic slice of Thirties comedy-noir.Praise for Kept: A Victorian Mystery:'Very entertaining and well done, with a sharp appreciation for the details' The Times'An ingenious tale of madness, murder and deception.' The Guardian'A stylish page-turner ... all done with humour and cunning.' Sunday Telegraph

Robinson

A Brief History of Life in Victorian Britain

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson
Robinson

Mary Seacole

Jane Robinson
Authors:
Jane Robinson

The 'Greatest Black Briton in History' triumphed over the Crimea and Victorian England. "The Times" called her a heroine, Florence Nightingale called her a brothel-keeping quack, and Queen Victoria's nephew called her, simply, 'Mammy' - Mary Seacole was one of the most eccentric and charismatic women of her era. Born at her mother's hotel in Jamaica in 1805, she became an independent 'doctress' combining the herbal remedies of her African ancestry with sound surgical techniques. On the outbreak of the Crimean War, she arrived in London desperate to join Florence Nightingale at the Front, but the authorities refused to see her. Being black, nearly 50, rather stout, and gloriously loud in every way, she was obviously unsuitable. Undaunted, Mary travelled to Balaklava under her own steam to build the 'British Hotel', just behind the lines. It was an outrageous venture, and a huge success - she became known and loved by everyone from the rank and file to the royal family. For more than a century after her death this remarkable woman was all but forgotten. This, the first full-length biography of a Victorian celebrity recently voted the greatest black Briton in history, brings Mary Seacole centre stage at last.

Robinson

A Brief History of the Cold War

John Hughes-Wilson
Authors:
John Hughes-Wilson

The Cold War was an undeclared war, fought silently and carefully between ideological opponents armed with the most fearsome weapons mankind has ever seen. Hughes-Wilson takes a cool look at this war, from the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the dissolution of the USSR thereafter. He examines the suspicion and paranoia -- on both sides -- of the greatest stand-off in history. Written by one of Britain's leading, popular, military historians, this book makes accessible for the first time one of the key periods to shape our world.

Founded in 1795

Constable

Constable and Co was founded in 1795 when Archibald Constable, an Edinburgh bookseller, opened a shop and began to publish a few original works under his own name. Thus was one of the first independent UK publishing houses started, and over the decades it became known as a house of excellence, publishing such names as Sir Walter Scott, Henry James, George Bernard Shaw and Bram Stoker.

Hugh Small

Hugh Small is a social historian and political economist with a long previous career in industry after graduating from Durham University with honours in physics and psychology. From 1976 to 1981 Hugh Small was the principal network architect for the world's first commercial internet, the SITA multi-airline reservations network. From 1983 to 1998 he was a partner in two US strategic management consulting firms, Arthur D. Little and A.T. Kearney. In 1998 he changed career and began to research social reform in Victorian Britain. His historical publications include Florence Nightingale, Avenging Angel (Constable, 1998) and The Crimean War (Tempus Publishing, 2007). His final revised biography of Florence Nightingale will be published in the summer of 2017 by Robinson, an imprint of Little, Brown Book Group. It reveals new evidence that Nightingale implemented the sanitation revolution which academics now agree was the cause of the astonishing increase in national life expectancy which began in the 1870s. This activity had nothing to do with the hospital nursing reforms with which Nightingale has been traditionally associated.Hugh Small is a widower with two daughters and five grandchildren. His website is www.hugh-small.co.uk

Monday 3 February 2014

Little, Brown Book Group Acquires Constable & Robinson

Ursula Mackenzie CEO of Little, Brown and Nova Jayne Robinson, Chairman of Constable & Robinson are delighted to announce that, with immediate effect, Constable & Robinson will join Little, Brown Book Group.