Related to: 'Melatu Uche Okorie'

Hachette Audio

When the Clouds Fell from the Sky

Robert Carmichael
Authors:
Robert Carmichael

'To keep you is no benefit, to destroy you is no loss.'During the Khmer Rouge's four-year rule of terror, two million people, or one in every four, Cambodians, died. In describing one family's decades-long quest to learn their husband's and father's fate and the war crimes trial of Comrade Duch (pronounced 'Doyk'), who ran the notorious S-21 prison in Phnom Penh, where thousands were tortured prior to their execution, When the Clouds Fell from the Sky illuminates not only the tragedy of a nation, but also the fundamental limitations of international justice. In February 2012, the international war crimes court in Cambodia handed down a life sentence to the man known by his revolutionary moniker Comrade Duch. The court found the Khmer Rouge's former security chief responsible for the deaths of more than 12,000 people at S-21 prison.Duch's conviction was historic. He was the first Khmer Rouge member to be jailed for crimes committed during Pol Pot's catastrophic 1975-9 rule when two million people died from execution, starvation, illness and overwork as Cambodia underwent the most radical social transformation ever attempted. When the Khmer Rouge took power in 1975, the entire population was driven from the towns and cities into rural gulags, where they were put to work planting rice and constructing vast irrigation schemes Designed to outdo even Mao's Great Leap Forward, it was an unparalleled disaster.At the same time as the Khmer Rouge sought to refashion the country, they closed its borders, barred all communication with the outside world and turned back the clock to Year Zero. They outlawed religion, markets, money, education and even the concept of family as they pursued a revolution that would outstrip all others. In Orwellian fashion, everything and everyone belonged to Angkar, the anonymous leaders, and all loyalty was owed to them. The individual had no value beyond their utility as a working unit that could easily be replaced.It was not long before the revolution began to implode, driven to destruction by the incompetence and paranoia of Angkar. Yet instead of recognising their own failings, the leaders believed unseen enemies were undermining the revolution. They sought them everywhere, both inside and outside the movement. In their pursuit of purity they destroyed a nation. This was the closed nation to which Ouk Ket returned in 1977. Like hundreds of other returnees, he was utterly unaware of the terrors being wrought in the revolution's name. Hundreds of thousands of other Cambodians perished in nearly 200 institutions like S-21 that formed an inescapable web across the country. Most of the rest died of starvation, overwork and illness in the rural gulags. Cambodia remains defined by this cataclysmic period, and its effects are apparent today. To illustrate this era and its consequences, Robert Carmichael has woven together the stories of five people whose lives intersected to traumatic effect. Duch is one of those five, and the book tackles this complex man and his life through the prism of his trial.The second person is a Frenchwoman called Neary. Her father - the returning diplomat Ouk Ket - was one of Duch's 12,000 proven victims. She was just two when he disappeared. When the Clouds Fell from the Sky is as much about Neary as it is about Duch: her efforts to find out more about the fate of her father, and her subsequent battle to accept it. Towards the end of the book, in one of its key scenes, Neary testifies against Duch at the international war crimes court in Phnom Penh.Intertwined is Duch's quest for redemption: his efforts during his nine-month trial to make those in the courtroom understand the twists and turns of his life and the decisions he took - some logical, others seemingly banal - that culminated in him running one of the twentieth century's most brutal institutions. The truths that emerge during Duch's trial help to illuminate this enigmatic man and how, in many ways, he is little different from most of us.The third and fourth characters are Ket and his wife Martine, who met in 1970 when they were studying at university in Paris. The fifth is Ket's cousin Sady, who never left Cambodia and is today a sixty-something teacher in Phnom Penh. Sady and Ket grew up together in 1960s' Phnom Penh, so Sady is able to tell us about Ket's early years, She also describes the reality of life under the Khmer Rouge: the forced eviction from Phnom Penh in 1975, the murder of her younger brother in 1977, the deaths of Ket's father and siblings, and her suffering in the rural labour camps. Sady's story is the experience of countless Cambodians.Through these five stories, through the author's own research, through interviews with leading academics, former Khmer Rouge and ordinary Cambodians, and by following Duch's trial, which Robert did for months, the book takes the experience of one forgotten man to tell the story of a nation. Since we cannot grasp the concept of millions of dead, he has used the murder of one to speak for the deaths of many. In so doing the book reaffirms the value of the individual, countering the Khmer Rouge's nihilistic maxim that: 'To keep you is no benefit, to destroy you is no loss.'

Virago

This Hostel Life

Melatu Uche Okorie
Authors:
Melatu Uche Okorie
Robinson

Angels in the Trenches

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie
Non-Duality Press

Boundless Awareness

Michael Rodriguez
Authors:
Michael Rodriguez
New Harbinger

Exposure Therapy for Treating Anxiety in Children and Adolescents

Veronica L. Raggi, Jessica G. Samson, Julia W. Felton, Heather R. Loffredo, Lisa H. Berghorst
Authors:
Veronica L. Raggi, Jessica G. Samson, Julia W. Felton, Heather R. Loffredo, Lisa H. Berghorst

Written by a team of clinicians specializing in the treatment of children and adolescents, this professional guide offers a comprehensive, practical resource for implementing exposure therapy when treating children and adolescents with anxiety. Each chapter is devoted to tailoring exposure work to a specific anxiety-related condition, such as separation anxiety, phobias, panic, social anxiety, and more, using a variety of creative exposure ideas and activities.In Exposure Therapy for Treating Anxiety in Children and Adolescents, you'll find detailed hierarchies and clinical suggestions for treating each specific childhood anxiety condition, including separation anxiety, school refusal, selective mutism, specific phobia, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, social anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and emotion tolerance. The book also offers an overview of exposure therapy and its implementation in children and adolescents, including a review of current research and empirical findings on this approach.With this book, you'll also find solid strategies for conducting detailed clinical assessments, so you can gain a greater understanding the specific anxiety triggers and factors that play a role in the development of and maintenance of the child's problem, and learn how this information can be used to guide you in your development of specific exposure exercises. Finally, you'll find tips on how to assess for family variables that may contribute to the maintenance of the child's condition, as well as ways to work with parents in becoming effective coaches for their children during exposure-based activities.Children are vastly different than adults in their treatment needs and in the process through which effective therapy is implemented. If you're looking for clear, practical guidelines for designing, adapting, and implementing specific exposure exercises for your young clients, this book provides everything you need in one place.

Piatkus

Little Soldiers

Lenora Chu
Authors:
Lenora Chu

'I couldn't put this book down. Whip smart, hilariously funny and shocking. A must-read'Amy Chua, Yale Law Professor and author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger MotherIn 2009, Lenora Chu, her husband Rob, and toddler Rainey, moved from LA to the Chinese megacity Shanghai. The US economy was spinning circles, while China seemed to be eating the planet's economic lunch. What's more, Shanghai teenagers were top in the world at maths, reading and science. China was not only muscling the rest of the world onto the sidelines, but it was also out-educating the West. So when Rainey was given the opportunity to enroll in Shanghai's most elite public kindergarten, Lenora and Rob grabbed it. Noticing her rambunctious son's rapid transformation - increasingly disciplined and obedient but more anxious and fearful - Lenora begins to question the system. What the teachers were accomplishing was indisputable, but what to make of their methods? Are Chinese children paying a price for their obedience and the promise of future academic prowess? How much discipline is too much? And is the Chinese education system really what the West should measure itself against? While Rainey was at school, Lenora embarked on a reporting mission to answer these questions in a larger context. Through a combination of the personal narratives and thoughts of teachers, parents, administrators and school children, Little Soldiers unpacks the story of education in China.

Piatkus

A Fearless Heart

Thupten Jinpa
Authors:
Thupten Jinpa

'[A] timely book on compassion and its cultivation' The Dalai Lama'The bravest, cleverest and most engaging book I know on why we need to cultivate compassion' Jon Kabat-Zinn'A practical toolkit for becoming a better human being' Daniel Goleman Self-compassion is the overlooked key to achieving our goals. It can lead to increased happiness, stress reduction, a stronger sense of purpose, better health and a longer life. Yet many of us resist compassion, worrying that if we are too compassionate with others we will be taken advantage of and if we are too compassionate with ourselves we won't achieve our goals in life. Using the latest science, psychology (from contemporary Western and classical Buddhist sources) as well as stories from others and his own extraordinary life, Jinpa shows us how to train our compassion muscle. His powerful programme, derived from his remarkable course in Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT), is the perfect guide to achieving a greater sense of wellbeing.

Robinson

Superstition and Science

Derek Wilson
Authors:
Derek Wilson

'A dazzling chronicle, a bracing challenge to modernity's smug assumptions' - Bryce Christensen, Booklist'O what a world of profit and delightOf power, of honour and omnipotenceIs promised to the studious artisan.'Christopher Marlowe, Dr FaustusBetween the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, Europe changed out of all recognition and particularly transformative were the ardent quest for knowledge and the astounding discoveries and inventions which resulted from it. The movement of blood round the body; the movement of the earth round the sun; the velocity of falling objects (and, indeed, why objects fall) - these and numerous other mysteries had been solved by scholars in earnest pursuit of scientia. Several keys were on offer to thinkers seeking to unlock the portal of the unknown:Folk religion had roots deep in the pagan past. Its devotees sought the aid of spirits. They had stores of ancient wisdom, particularly relating to herbal remedies. Theirs was the world of wise women, witches, necromancers, potions and incantations.Catholicism had its own magic and its own wisdom. Dogma was enshrined in the collective wisdom of the doctors of the church and the rigid scholastic system of teaching. Magic resided in the ranks of departed saints and the priestly miracle of the mass.Alchemy was at root a desire to understand and to exploit the material world. Practitioners studied the properties of natural substances. A whole system of knowledge was built on the theory of the four humours.Astrology was based on the belief that human affairs were controlled by the movement of heavenly bodies. Belief in the casting of horoscopes was almost universal.Natural Philosophy really began with Francis Bacon and his empirical method. It was the beginning of science 'proper' because it was based on observation and not on predetermined theory.Classical Studies. University teaching was based on the quadrivium - which consisted largely of rote learning the philosophy and science current in the classical world (Plato, Aristotle, Galen, Ptolemy, etc.). Renaissance scholars reappraised these sources of knowledge.Islamic and Jewish Traditions. The twelfth-century polymath, Averroes, has been called 'the father of secular thought' because of his landmark treatises on astronomy, physics and medicine. Jewish scholars and mystics introduced the esoteric disciplines of the Kabbalah.New Discoveries. Exploration connected Europeans with other peoples and cultures hitherto unknown, changed concepts about the nature of the planet, and led to the development of navigational skills.These 'sciences' were not entirely self-contained. For example physicians and theologians both believed in the casting of horoscopes. Despite popular myth (which developed 200 years later), there was no perceived hostility between faith and reason. Virtually all scientists and philosophers before the Enlightenment worked, or tried to work, within the traditional religious framework. Paracelsus, Descartes, Newton, Boyle and their compeers proceeded on the a príori notion that the universe was governed by rational laws, laid down by a rational God.. This certainly did not mean that there were no conflicts between the upholders of different types of knowledge. Dr Dee's neighbours destroyed his laboratory because they believed he was in league with the devil. Galileo famously had his run-in with the Curia.By the mid-seventeenth century 'science mania' had set in; the quest for knowledge had become a pursuit of cultured gentlemen. In 1663 The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge received its charter. Three years later the French Academy of Sciences was founded. Most other European capitals were not slow to follow suit. In 1725 we encounter the first use of the word 'science' meaning 'a branch of study concerned either with a connected body of demonstrated truths or with observed facts systematically classified'. Yet, it was only nine years since the last witch had been executed in Britain - a reminder that, although the relationship of people to their environment was changing profoundly, deep-rooted fears and attitudes remained strong.

Moon Travel

Moon Atlanta (Third Edition)

Tray Butler
Authors:
Tray Butler

Skilled writer and journalist Tray Butler offers up his best advice on enjoying Atlanta, from the bustling financial Downtown district to the fabulous flavors of Little Five Points and East Atlanta and beyond. Butler offers unique trip strategies for a variety of travellers, such as "The Two-Day Best of Atlanta" and "New South, Old Flavors." Including expert coverage of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, the Atlanta Botanical Garden, the World of Coca-Cola, and Zoo Atlanta, Moon Atlanta gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

Nation Books

Goliath

Max Blumenthal
Authors:
Max Blumenthal

2014 Lannan Foundation Cultural Freedom Notable Book AwardIn Goliath , New York Times bestselling author Max Blumenthal takes us on a journey through the badlands and high roads of Israel-Palestine, painting a startling portrait of Israeli society under the siege of increasingly authoritarian politics as the occupation of the Palestinians deepens.Beginning with the national elections carried out during Israel's war on Gaza in 2008-09, which brought into power the country's most right-wing government to date, Blumenthal tells the story of Israel in the wake of the collapse of the Oslo peace process.As Blumenthal reveals, Israel has become a country where right-wing leaders like Avigdor Lieberman and Bibi Netanyahu are sacrificing democracy on the altar of their power politics where the loyal opposition largely and passively stands aside and watches the organized assault on civil liberties where state-funded Orthodox rabbis publish books that provide instructions on how and when to kill Gentiles where half of Jewish youth declare their refusal to sit in a classroom with an Arab and where mob violence targets Palestinians and African asylum seekers scapegoated by leading government officials as "demographic threats."Immersing himself like few other journalists inside the world of hardline political leaders and movements, Blumenthal interviews the demagogues and divas in their homes, in the Knesset, and in the watering holes where their young acolytes hang out, and speaks with those political leaders behind the organized assault on civil liberties. As his journey deepens, he painstakingly reports on the occupied Palestinians challenging schemes of demographic separation through unarmed protest. He talks at length to the leaders and youth of Palestinian society inside Israel now targeted by security service dragnets and legislation suppressing their speech, and provides in-depth reporting on the small band of Jewish Israeli dissidents who have shaken off a conformist mindset that permeates the media, schools, and the military.Through his far-ranging travels, Blumenthal illuminates the present by uncovering the ghosts of the past,the histories of Palestinian neighbourhoods and villages now gone and forgotten how that history has set the stage for the current crisis of Israeli society and how the Holocaust has been turned into justification for occupation.A brave and unflinching account of the real facts on the ground, Goliath is an unprecedented and compelling work of journalism.

Basic Books

The Cure in the Code

Peter W. Huber
Authors:
Peter W. Huber

Never before have two revolutions with so much potential to save and prolong human life occurred simultaneously. The converging, synergistic power of the biochemical and digital revolutions now allows us to read every letter of life's code, create precisely targeted drugs to control it, and tailor their use to individual patients. Cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and countless other killers can be vanquished,if we make full use of the tools of modern drug design and allow doctors the use of modern data gathering and analytical tools when prescribing drugs to their patients.But Washington stands in the way, clinging to outdated drug-approval protocols developed decades ago during medicine's long battle with the infectious epidemics of the past. Peter Huber, an expert in science, technology, and public policy, demonstrates why Washington's one-size-fits-all drug policies can't deal with diseases rooted in the complex molecular diversity of human bodies. Washington is ill-equipped to handle the torrents of data that now propel the advance of molecular medicine and is reluctant to embrace the statistical methods of the digital age that can. Obsolete economic policies, often rationalized as cost-saving measures, stifle innovation and suppress investment in the medicine that can provide the best cures at the lowest cost.In the 1980s, an AIDS diagnosis was a death sentence, until the FDA loosened its throttling grip and began streamlining and accelerating approval of life-saving drugs. The Cure in the Code shows patients, doctors, investors, and policy makers what we must now do to capture the full life-saving and cost-saving potential of the revolution in molecular medicine. America has to choose. At stake for America is the power to lead the world in mastering the most free, fecund, competitive, dynamic, and intelligent natural resource on the planet,the molecular code that spawns human life and controls our health.

Piatkus

What Doesn't Kill Us

Stephen Joseph
Authors:
Stephen Joseph

Research has shown than anywhere from 30 to 90 per cent of people confronted by tragedy, horror and adversity emerge as wiser, more mature and more fulfilled people, sometimes despite great sadness. Relationships become stronger. Perspectives on life change. Inner strengths are found.For the past twenty years, Stephen Joseph has worked with survivors of trauma and sufferers of posttraumatic stress. In this groundbreaking book, he boldly challenges the notion that trauma and its aftermath devastate and destroy the lives. His studies have shown that a wide range of traumatic events - from illness, separation, assault and bereavement to accidents, natural disasters and terrorism - can act as catalysts for positive change, strengthening relationships, changing one's perspective and revealing inner strengths.In What Doesn't Kill Us, Stephen Joseph shares the six steps we can all use to manage our emotions and navigate adversity to find new meaning, purpose and direction in our lives.

PublicAffairs

Those Who Have Borne the Battle

James Wright
Authors:
James Wright

At the heart of the story of America's wars are our"citizen soldiers&rdquo- those hometown heroes who fought and sacrificed from Bunker Hill at Charlestown to Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, and beyond, without expectation of recognition or recompense. Americans like to think that the service of its citizen volunteers is, and always has been, of momentous importance in our politics and society. But though this has made for good storytelling, the reality of America's relationship to its veterans is far more complex. In Those Who Have Borne the Battle, historian and marine veteran James Wright tells the story of the long, often troubled relationship between America and those who have defended her- from the Revolutionary War to today- shedding new light both on our history and on the issues our country and its armed forces face today. From the beginning, American gratitude to its warriors was not a given. Prior to World War II, the prevailing view was that, as citizen soldiers, the service of its young men was the price of citizenship in a free society. Even Revolutionary War veterans were affectionately, but only temporarily, embraced, as the new nation and its citizens had much else to do. In time, the celebration of the nation's heroes became an important part of our culture, building to the response to World War II, where warriors were celebrated and new government programs provided support for veterans. The greater transformation came in the wars after World War II, as the way we mobilize for war, fight our wars, and honor those who serve has changed in drastic and troubling ways. Unclear and changing military objectives have made our actions harder for civilians to stand behind, a situation compounded by the fact that the armed forces have become less representative of American society as a whole. Few citizens join in the sacrifice that war demands. The support systems seem less and less capable of handling the increasing number of wounded warriors returning from our numerous and bewildering conflicts abroad. A masterful work of history, Those Who Have Borne the Battle expertly relates the burdens carried by veterans dating back to the Revolution, as well as those fighting today's wars. And it challenges Americans to do better for those who serve and sacrifice today.

Seal Press

Lessons from the Monk I Married

Katherine Jenkins
Authors:
Katherine Jenkins

Lessons from the Monk I Married offers up ten of the most powerful lessons about life, love, and spirituality that Katherine Jenkins has gathered during her marriage to former Buddhist monk Seong Yoon Lee. A seeker in the truest sense of the word, Jenkins went to Korea on a whim, hoping to find the answers to her deepest, most pressing questions about how to find peace and her purpose in life. During her first months there, she sought out a remote temple, where she unknowingly crossed paths with an unassuming Buddhist monk. Months later, they met again by chance,and fell in love. Though their courtship was long, mostly secretive, and fraught with logistical and spiritual considerations, Jenkins and Lee were ultimately married in Korea in 2003. Through their relationship, Jenkins discovered the most important lesson of all: No one holds the keys to peace and happiness,you have walk your own path and find your own wisdom through your own experiences. More than the improbable story of a girl from Seattle who found peace of mind (and love) with a Buddhist monk, Lessons from the Monk I Married is an approachable guide to the most elemental spiritual questions of our day.

PublicAffairs

Ship of Fools

Fintan O'Toole
Authors:
Fintan O'Toole

The death of the Celtic tiger is not an extinction event to trouble naturalists. There was, in fact nothing natural about this tiger, if it ever really existed. The"Irish Economic miracle&rdquo was built on good old-fashioned subsidies (from the European Union) and the simple fact that until the 1980s Ireland was by the standards of the developed world so economically backward that the only way was up. And as it began to catch up to European and American averages, the Irish economy could boast some seemingly remarkable statistics. These lured in investors, the Irish deregulated and all but abandoned financial oversight, and a great Irish financial ceilidh began. It would last for a decade. When the global financial crash of 2008 arrived it struck Ireland harder than anywhere-even Iceland looked like a model of rectitude compared to the fiasco that stretched from Cork to Dublin. There was an avalanche of statistics as toxic as the property-based assets that lay beneath many of them: type="disc" The International Monetary Fund was predicting that Ireland's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) would shrink by 13.5 per cent in 2009 and 2010-the worst performance among all the advanced economies and one of the worst ever recorded in peacetime in the developed world. type="disc" Government debt almost doubled in a year. type="disc" In May 2008, &euro13.5 million was paid for a 450-acre farm in Warrenstown, County Meath-one of the highest prices ever paid for agricultural land anywhere in the world. By 2009 the level of debt among Irish households and companies was the highest in the European Union. type="disc" The country's gross indebtedness was larger than Japan's, which has thirty times the population. type="disc" Between 1994 and 2006, the average second-hand house price in Dublin increased from &euro82,772 to &euro512,461-a rise of 519 per cent. By 2009 Irish house prices had fallen more rapidly than any others in Europe. type="disc" With a fifth of its office spaces empty, Dublin had the highest vacancy rate of any European capital and was rated as having the worst development and investment potential of twenty-seven European cities. type="disc" The Irish stock exchange fell by 68 per cent in 2008 type="disc" The average Irish family had lost almost half its financial assets type="disc" Unemployment rose faster than in any other Western European country, increasing by 85 per cent in a year. type="disc" Ireland's bad bank, the National Assets Management Agency (Nama), which had to take over &euro90 billion in loans to developers from banks that would otherwise be insolvent holds more assets [sic] than any publicly quoted property company in the world, dwarfing giants such as GE Capital Real Estate and Morgan Stanley Real Estate, which own assets of &euro60 billion and &euro48 billion respectively.And under all this rubble lay the corpse of the Celtic Tiger. How Ireland managed to achieve such a spectacular implosion is a stunning story of corruption, carelessness and venality, told with passion and fury by one of Ireland's most respected journalists and commentators.

How To Books

How To Run A Great Hotel

Enda M Larkin
Authors:
Enda M Larkin

This book is based on the premise that being good is just not good enough in today's competitive environment. For hotel owners and managers who want to achieve lasting business success through a root and branch review of key processes, How To Run a Great Hotel is a 'must read'. It will serve as a personal business consultant for the hotel professional, probing and testing their thinking across four critical themes which are proven to drive excellence. The content focuses less on day-to-day operations and more on big picture concerns such as strategy development, enhancing leadership skills, engaging employees and attaining customer focus, all of which are central to building a great hotel. Without clear direction in these important areas to guide activities, ongoing daily effort can be counterproductive. It's easy for hoteliers to lose sight of their goals when, engulfed by operational demands, they are often forced to just do rather than to think about what they are doing. This book provides the reader with an opportunity to step back and take a fresh look at their hotel, no matter where it currently lies in its life cycle. The purpose of the book is to get them to question what it is they are doing, why they are doing it and to offer guidance on how they can make it even better. The book is easy to read, practical, and action oriented. It will help the reader to define clear plans with measurable goals for improved personal and business performance.Contents: Acknowledgements; Foreword; Preface; Introduction; Theme 1 - Define Direction; Chapter 1. What is a strategic map and how can it help you to achieve excellence?; Chapter 2. How can you create a strategic map for your hotel?; Chapter 3. How can you measure the impact of your strategic map over time?; Theme 2 - Lead to Suceed; Chapter 4. What does leading people actually involve?; Chapter 5. How can you improve leadership effectiveness at your hotel?; Chapter 6. How can you measure leadership effectiveness over time?; Theme 3 - Engage Your Employees; Chapter 7. What does engaging your employees actually involve?; Chapter 8. What can you do to more fully engage your employees?; 9. How can you measure employee engagement levels over time?; Theme 4 - Captivate your customers; Chapter 10. What is SERVICEPLUSONE and why is it important?; Chapter 11. How can you attain SERVICEPLUSONE at your hotel?; Chapter 12. How can you measure the impact of SERVICEPLUSONE over time?; Make it Happen; Theme 1 - Define Direction; Theme 2 - Lead to Suceed; Theme 3 - Engage Your Employees; Theme 4 - Captivate Your Customers; Looking ahead; Tools and Resources; Index.

How To Books

How To Run A Great Hotel

Enda M Larkin
Authors:
Enda M Larkin
Chapter One

The Uncommon Appeal of Clouds

Read the first chapter of the latest book in Alexander McCall Smith's Sunday Philosophy Club series. The victim of an important art theft appeals to Isabel Dalhousie, Edinburgh philosopher and sleuth, for help.

by Nora Roberts

The Witness: Chapter 1

Chapter One of Nora Roberts' thrilling romance, The Witness.

Award winning author of historical fiction

Interview with Elizabeth Chadwick

Elizabeth Chadwick is the award-winning historical fiction writer. Voted one of the Top Ten landmark historical novelists of the decade by the Historical Novel Society, Chadwick is acclaimed for her beguiling characters, faultless research, and her ability to bring history vividly to life. Perfect for fans of Bernard Cornwell and Philippa Gregory, her latest novel, Lady of the English (published in September 2012), is a dazzling tale of two very different women battling it out over the English crown. In this interview Chadwick talks about the inspirations behind her novels, what she is working on at the moment and much more.