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Every Colour of You

By Amelia Mandeville
Authors:
Amelia Mandeville
Heart-breaking, heart-healing and a story you won't want to end, Amelia Mandeville's unforgettable debut is a love story with a difference, for fans of Me Before You, The Summer of Impossible Things and Giovanna FletcherWe had a story - short, but not a simple one. I couldn't stay here and explain it all to you. If you really want to know, you'll have to take time out of your day. You'll have to read it...Zoe's life is full of colour. A fan of impromptu yoga, inspirational quotes and experimenting with hair dye, she's on a mission to make the most of each and every day - even if she is currently spending most of her time behind a checkout till.Then she meets Tristan. The rumour is that since his dad died, Tristan's life has fallen apart. No one has seen him for months. But now he's reappeared, does that mean he's back to 'normal'?Zoe soon realises Tristan is struggling with a sadness that she can't possibly understand and becomes determined to bring a world of colour back into his life. But the harder she tries, the more she realises it's something she can't fix - and in trying to put him back together, a part of her is beginning to fall apart. . .'A beautiful coming of age story filled with colourful characters' Emma Cooper, author of The Songs of Us~~~~Real readers love Every Colour of You . . .'Beautifully written and full of emotion' NetGalley reviewer'A touching, heart-warming, feel-good novel' Goodreads reviewer'An utterly heart wrenching tale of friendship, love, happiness, sadness, fun and pure joy' NetGalley reviewer'I'm not over the ending yet . . . Simply stunning' Goodreads reviewer'A story that is both heartbreaking and heartwarming all at once (yes it is possible)' Goodreads reviewer
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Trust Her

By Jessica Vallance
Authors:
Jessica Vallance
A twisty, gripping story of lies, obsession and revenge that will have you wondering who to believe until the last page. It wasn't just that I didn't like her. I didn't trust her. Charlotte is a people pleaser - she can't help but go the extra mile. So when she stumbles upon an unconscious man one night, it's only natural that she wants to help.Brought into the arms of the victim's loving family, she sees at once how much they need her. But while his parents happily welcome her into the fold, his sister is another story. It's not just that Rebecca doesn't like Charlotte, she clearly doesn't trust her either.But the more time Charlotte spends in Rebecca's company, the more she suspects she's the one with something to hide. And if Charlotte is to protect this family - and herself - she'll need to do whatever she can to find out what that is . . . What readers are saying about TRUST HER:'Becomes more complex with every chapter' 'Fast paced and intriguing''The characters felt very real and believable' 'Twists and turns that will keep you guessing until the very end''Excellent . . . I would highly recommend this book to anyone!'
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A Wedding on Christmas Street

By Ivy Pembroke
Authors:
Ivy Pembroke
'Heartwarmingly festive - if only all streets were like Christmas Street!' Ali McNamaraSam is about to propose to his girlfriend Libby, and his neighbours in Christmas Street all think they know the right way to do it. With their help - and sometimes hinderance - Sam gains a fiancée and the wedding planning begins. Meanwhile, Sam's nine-year-old son Teddy and his friend Pari - with their constant companion Jack the street dog - are fascinated by the arrival of a mysterious new neighbour on the street who has rented the empty, run-down house. Their attempts to spy on her are thwarted by her staying indoors with the curtains drawn most of the time. But soon Christmas Street begins to work its magic and Millie is reluctantly drawn into street activities.As Millie starts to relax into thinking she can have a different life, maybe even with Jasper, the local carpenter, someone turns up from her past to threaten that. But with all of the street looking out for her, Millie's Christmas will be filled with hope and promise.

Planet of the Apes

By Maurice, Greg Keyes
Authors:
Maurice, Greg Keyes

Live the Let-Go Life

By Joseph Prince
Authors:
Joseph Prince
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The Little Prince Notecards

By Running Press
Authors:
Running Press
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's The Little Prince has captured the imaginations of readers both young and old since its initial publication in 1943. The story's themes of humanity, concern for the environment, the specialness of childhood, love, and friendship have resonated across generations.Now you can share personalized messages of joy, thanks, or just hello with these unique notecards inspired by one of the most cherished and thought-provoking books of all time. The set comes with:20 cards, each featuring a quote and full-color artwork from The Little Prince, with space for your own message. The set comes with four each of five different designs. 20 blank envelopes

Winner Takes All (New edition)

By Christina Binkley
Authors:
Christina Binkley
The Strip. Home to some of the world's grandest, flashiest, and most lucrative casino resorts, Las Vegas, with its multitude of attractions, draws millions of tourists from around the world every year. But Sin City hasn't always been booming: modern Vegas exists largely thanks to the extraordinary vision, and remarkable hubris, of three competing business moguls: Kirk Kerkorian, Dr. Gary Loveman, and Steve Wynn. Having had personal access to all three tycoons, Binkley explains how their audacious efforts to reach the top-and to top one another-shaped the city as it stands. She takes us inside their grandest schemes, their riskiest deals, and the personalities that drove them to their greatest successes, and their most painful defeats. In this updated edition, she reveals the inside story of how Steve Wynn, the winner who took all, ultimately lost everything-twice. Sharp, insightful, and revealing, Winner Takes All is the gripping story of how billions of dollars and the unparalleled drive for power turned dreams into larger-than-life reality.

Moon USA National Parks (First Edition)

By Becky Lomax
Authors:
Becky Lomax
They've been dubbed America's best idea for a reason: get inspired and get outdoors with Moon USA National Parks. Inside you'll find:Coverage of all 59 national parks, from the misty mountains of the east and the redwoods of the west, to the glaciers of Alaska and volcanoes of Hawaii Strategic itineraries organized by region and by activity: Find the best parks for your timeline and interests, with lists of the top parks for hiking, winter activities, wildlife, solitude, scenic drives, and moreComprehensive planning resources: With detailed maps and transportation tips, you'll have the tools to explore each park or region individually, or visit multiple for an epic parks tripHow to take a national parks road trip, with advice on how to link the parks together and interesting stops between themThe top outdoor adventures for hikers, bikers, climbers, kayakers, whitewater rafters, and moreExpert advice from former park guide Becky Lomax on how to beat the crowds, the best times of year to visit, and nearby attractions and state parksWhere to stay in and around each park, whether you're pitching the tent, parking the RV, or bedding down at a hotelPractical tips and background information on weather, terrain, wildlife, history, and health and safety precautions Know before you go: Up-to-date information on fees, passes, and reservations, including how to obtain and use a National Parks PassGorgeous, full-color photos throughout, plus a handy keepsake section for your national parks stamps and a foldout poster mapExpert insight and honest advice on visiting every national park: with Moon's help, make it a trip to remember.

The Forgotten

By Ben Bradlee, Jr.
Authors:
Ben Bradlee, Jr.
An up-close look at the voters of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania who decisively swung the state for Donald J. Trump, examining the role of the President's base as the midterm elections loomLuzerne County Pennsylvania, as Ben Bradlee describes it, is a microcosm of the nation. While it boasts its own police, firemen, schools and municipal services, Luzerne has few urban centers and is fundamentally rural in character. And like so many of the 3,000 other counties that resemble it across America, Donald J. Trump won Luzerne County in 2016. But President Obama had carried Luzerne in both elections. What changed? And what does this mean for America? The Forgotten tells this story, revealing how Trump voters came to feel like strangers in their own land, marginalized by flat or falling wages, rapid demographic change, and a liberal culture that mocks their faith and patriotism. As they explain it, residents of Luzerne felt like others were 'cutting in line' and that the federal government was taking too much money from the employed and giving it to the idle. They felt a loss of breadwinner status, and more importantly, a loss of dignity. Drawing an unforgettable portrait of Americans caught in a fraught political moment that doesn't seem to end, The Forgotten not only expresses the growing divide between the two political parties, but also the immense forces that powered the election of Donald Trump. America is changing, and the men and women of The Forgotten are the ones who are changing it.

The League

By John Eisenberg
Authors:
John Eisenberg
Today, the NFL is the world's most popular sports league, a towering, distinctly American colossus spewing out $10 billion in annual revenues. Given its current dominance, most fans could never imagine professional football's dismal early years, or how five men of varied backgrounds and talents managed to keep the sport alive. The rise of the NFL is one of the most improbable tales in sports, and in The League, John Eisenberg gives us this story in all of its drama and color. Rooney, Halas, Mara, Marshall, and Bell-their names are enshrined in Canton and in the minds of fans across the country. When they started out, however, they were gamblers, bookies, and prodigal sons. And when they came together in the 1920s to create a new league, they faced the kind of long odds only a horseplayer could love. At the time, America's sports fans cared more about baseball, college football, horse racing, and boxing. Pro football was widely ignored, even mocked as only slightly more serious than the circus. The Great Depression and rival leagues almost put the fledgling enterprise out of business. Through it all, Rooney and company expanded, devising new ways of bringing fans to the sport as well as new tactics on the field. Finally, in the 1950s, with the advent of TV and the creation of the wildly entertaining spread attack, the game truly arrived.Taking us from the smoke-filled rooms where the founders plotted their rise to the dirt fields on which their game first flourished, Eisenberg shows that the league survived only because each man brought to it a particular skill. Marshall had a nose for business, Halas the innovative football mind, Rooney the gambler's eye for the main chance, Mara the chutzpah, and Bell the managerial talent. Together they did it all-finding the stadiums and the crowds to fill them, coaching the teams (and even taking the field in a pinch), marketing their product, even while squabbling among themselves, over matters of profit and prestige. At once a history of a sport and a great American success story, The League is an absolute must-read for any fan of the true national pastime.

1619

By James Horn
Authors:
James Horn
1619 offers a new interpretation of the significance of Jamestown in the long trajectory of American history. Jamestown, the cradle of American democracy, also saw the birth of our nation's greatest challenge: the corrosive legacy of slavery and racism that have deepened and entrenched stark inequalities in our society. After running Jamestown under martial law from 1610-1616, the Virginia Company turned toward representative government in an effort to provide settlers with more control over their own affairs and more incentive to invest further in the colony. Governor Edwin Sandys dreamed of creating a real commonwealth, to provide for the interests of settlers and Indians alike. Thus, in late July 1619, the newly-formed General Assembly gathered to introduce "just Laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people." It was the first legislature in America, and history has cast it as the foundation of American freedom and democracy. From that moment on, propertied white colonists became accustomed to freedoms that would have been unthinkable in England with its layers of customs and hierarchy of courts and regulations, and these expanding political and economic freedoms attracted countless British immigrants and other Europeans to Virginia and the American colonies. But those very freedoms also permitted the wholesale and largely unchecked exploitation of poor white laborers and non-European peoples. More than nine-tenths of all those arriving in Virginia at this time were brought in some form of servitude or labor contract. In a cruel irony, 1619 also saw the arrival of the first African slaves in Virginia. The establishment of the General Assembly did nothing to ameliorate these disparities, but rather put ever more power in the hands of local grandees. Sandys's dream of creating a commonwealth in the interests of settlers and Indians proved short-lived. But the twin pillars of democracy-the rule of law and representative government based on the consent of the people-survived and flourished. It was his greatest legacy to America. What was lost was his steadfast conviction that serving the common good served all. This is a pattern we recognize all too well in modern American society-opportunities are not shared, inequality is rampant, racism is systemic. We would like to think these are problems that can be solved by expanding representative democracy; Jamestown teaches us, instead, that these are problems have long been created and encouraged by American democracy. Casting a skeptical eye on deeply-cherished myths, 1619 will be essential reading for anyone struggling to understand the paradox of American freedom.

At Home in Joshua Tree

By Rich Combs, Sara Combs
Authors:
Rich Combs, Sara Combs
Reset, reflect, create. That's the motto at the Joshua Tree House -- an irresistibly bohemian bed-and-breakfast in the storied hi-desert of southern California. Guided by nature and the cycles of the sun, the Joshua Tree House offers an intentional, mindful way of living that combines the very best of the wellness movement and modern design to celebrate the singular beauty of the desert. At Home in Joshua Tree offers a peak inside this world, with Joshua Tree House founders Sara and Rich Combs bringing readers into their warm, inviting world through mindful practices that enhance the everyday. They begin by introducing life in the hi-desert, as well as their design principles, before moving through a day in the desert (sunrise, morning, mid-day, dusk, nightfall, etc.), with each chapter highlighting designs, recipes, wellness practices, and entertaining rituals that elevate and honor the ordinary moments associated with that time. Interviews with other designers, artists, and makers who are inspired by the desert, including those whose designs are featured throughout the Joshua Tree House, are featured throughout, alongside gorgeous full-bleed photographs and a complete sourcing guide.

The Rise of Andrew Jackson

By David S. Heidler, Jeanne T. Heidler
Authors:
David S. Heidler, Jeanne T. Heidler
The Rise of Andrew Jackson recounts our seventh president's unlikely ascent to the highest office in the land. Born poor in what became the border region between North and South Carolina, Jackson's sole claim on the public's affections derived from his victory in a thirty-minute battle in early 1815 on the banks of the Mississippi River. A disputatious, often cruel man, he did not seem cut out for any public office, let alone the highest in the land. Yet he acquired acolytes-operatives, handlers, editors, politicians-who for more than a decade labored to make him the President of the United States, and who finally succeeded in 1828.The acclaimed historians David and Jeanne Heidler are the first to examine Jackson's rise by looking primarily at the men (and they were all men) who made it possible, among them future president Martin van Buren, the Karl Rove of his day; Sam Houston, later a leader of the Texas Revolution; and John Overton, Jackson's onetime roommate and romantic rival. They and other of Jackson's supporters published quaint stories of kindness, such as the rescue of the Indian baby Lyncoya. They made him the friend of debtors (he privately dismissed them as deadbeats) and the advocate for low tariffs or high tariffs (he had no opinion on the matter). They styled him the ideological heir of Thomas Jefferson, though he had openly opposed President Jefferson, and the Sage of Monticello himself had been openly dismayed by Jackson's popularity.The Heidlers have pored over the sources from the era-newspaper accounts, private correspondence, memoirs, and more-to tell a story of rude encampments on frontier campaigns and of countless torch lit gatherings where boisterous men munched barbecue, swigged whiskey, and squinted at speakers standing on tree stumps. Theirs is a tale of ink-stained editors in cluttered newspaper offices churning out partisan copy and of men pondering deals and pledges in the smoke-filled rooms of hotels and meeting halls. The Rise of Andrew Jackson is, in sum, an eye-opening account of the first instance of deliberate image-building and myth-making in American history-of nothing less than the birth of modern politics.Eventually, Jackson's supporters would be called Jacksonian Democrats and their movement would be labeled Jacksonian Democracy, giving the impression that it arose from an ethos espoused by the man himself. Yet as the Heidlers indelibly show, that was just another trick of the men trying to harness the movement, who saw in Jackson an opportunity not so much for helping the little man but for their own personal revenge against the genteel politicos of their day.